Wednesday, August 27, 2008

URIAH HEEP LEGACY



One of the most legendary bands which still don’t rest on their laurels, band members who have such big smiles on stage as if they have only just started, that band is Uriah Heep. The band that have performed in 47 different countries, a band that have built up a network of fans around the world, a band that are faithfully invited by the fan club to Holland each and every year. A technically brilliant heavy rock band who were not very successful on the commercial radio market, they may be most noted for staying in existence, despite over 40 personnel changes and two deaths along the way. (Source: classicband.com)
Uriah Heep began searching for that elusive blend of power and brashness way back in March 1970.



SPICE Line Up:
Mick Box, David Byron, Barry Green, Paul Newton, Nigel Pegrum, Alex Napier (Colin Wood)
Image by heepfiles.com




A band called Spice was recording an album when a new organist, a friend of the bassist, was asked to join. Hensley remembers, "It was collectively agreed that the group changed substantially and should therefore be launched as a totally new thing." A different name was taken from a character in Charles Dickens' David Copperfield, and studio sessions were arranged in order to start working on the album almost from scratch. "Actually, some of the songs that Spice had recorded later formed the nucleus of that first Uriah Heep album, Very 'Eavy...Very 'Umble."
The five musicians in the first incarnation of Heep were no rosy-cheeked amateurs. They had all done time in an interesting series of musical ventures.
Uriah Heep's by-the-books progressive heavy metal made the British band one of the most popular hard rock groups of the early '70s. Formed by vocalist David Byron and guitarist Mick Box in the late '60s, the group went through an astonishing number of members over the next two decades -- nearly 30 different musicians passed through the band over the years. Byron and Box were members of the mid-'60s rock band called the Stalkers; once that band broke up, the duo formed another group called Spice. Spice would eventually turn into Uriah Heep in the late '60s, once Ken Hensley (guitar, keyboards, vocals) and bassist Paul Newton joined the pair. Former Spice drummer Alex Napier was the band's drummer for a brief time; he was quickly replaced by Nigel Olsson.
(Source: emusic.com)



Line-Up:
Mick Box, Ken Hensley, David Byron, Paul Newton, Alex Napier
Image by heepfiles.com





Finding the right drummer and bassist has presented a major problem. The Uriah Heep rhythm section, so important to their overall sound, has consisted of quite a few people: Nigel Olsson, Keith Baker, and Ian Clarke all did a stretch in the drummer's throne before Lee Kerslake (an old friend of Ken's from The Gods and Toe Fat) dropped out of a struggling group known as the National Head Band to accept an offer to join Heep in December, 1971.



Line-Up:
Mick Box, KenHensley, David Byron, Paul Newton, Ian Clarke
Image by heepfiles.com



Ken Hensley, Iain Clarke, Mick Box, Paul Newton, David Byron
Image from Uriah Heep Holland Pic's



Line Up:
Mick Box, Ken Hensley, David Byron, Gary Thain, Lee Kerslake
Image by heepfiles.com





The line of bassists is only a little less imposing: Mark Clarke replaced Paul Newton, and stayed for the next two albums, Salisbury and Look At Yourself before he was dismissed in favor of Gary Thain whose job with the Keef Hartley band conveniently ended at the same time. After his arrival in January of 1972, the group recorded five albums, including a killer double collection, Uriah Heep Live, before Gary's departure this past winter.
John Lawton was finally confirmed as the new vocalist. De! Roll the bands Tour Manager and Lighting Engineer for many years had passed on a tape of John Lawton singing, to Lee and Mick. John had also been recommended by Roger Glover of Deep Purple with whom Lawton had worked the year before on the Butterfly Bail project. Lawton was formerly the vocalist for German band, Lucifers Friend. While the other members of Lucifers Friend supplemented their income playing with The James Last Orchestra, Lawton had kept his bank balance healthy by singing with The Les Humphries Singers. Tagged as a Eurovision Song Contest - singalong type group, some of the press had a field day in bringing to the fore this non-rock aspect of Lawton's career and predicted some pleasant singalong type numbers for future Uriah Heep releases.


John Lawton
Copyright 2008 Microsoft




However, Lawton was a powerful vocalist and was to prove himself a worthy addition to the band. Indeed the introduction of Bolder and Lawton in 1976 was to revive enthusiasm in Uriah Heep, the Byron years had ended with the band at a low ebb but this second phase of their history was, in many ways, to be just as successful. Stability reigned for a while with this line up which recorded three albums and was destined to almost last the decade out.



John Lawton
Image from Uriah Heep Holland Pic's




Lawton's voice proved that a more than adequate replacement for Byron had been found, although to some fans he could not match Byron's stage charisma. Despite alt the positive signs on the release of Firefly, it was the first Uriah Heep album that failed to chart in the UK for 5 years. The much publicised new direction was not that evident on the album, the sound was polished and some of the songs told stories with a hint of fantasy, a hallmark of Uriah Heep's great past. The melodic, heavy rock of Uriah Heep seemed to still be alive and keen with the band to keep the interest of the fans and the media, Uriah Heep returned to the studio to record an new album for release that same year.
The reason for all these changes has to do with the close feelings between the original three members. As Hensley describes it, "There developed a sort of relationship between David, Mick and myself. It never really gelled with the other members that came along. Lee was the first one who really fit in with our way of thinking, musically." The next person to really fit, according to Ken, is John Wetton who "thinks like us in many ways."
In the meantime, many of the dedicated fans from Uriah Heep's glory years drifted away from the band, disillusioned with the new pop sound, they were never to return to the fold. Other fans stayed loyal hoping for a return to albums full of the power and passion that they knew was still within the capabilities of the band. This was displayed on innocent Victim in songs like Free n Easy which could have come from any of the early Uriah Heep releases, it captured their ability to rock perfectly, and Choices, although penned by Jack Williams, a friend of Hensley's, it encased traditional Uriah Heep values. Other than these few tracks, there was little for the old fan, devoted to the classic Uriah Heep sound to get excited about. The monster, as it was called had dealt the band a double hand.
Perhaps with this in mind, Heep could have felt torn between two camps. On the one hand, they may have wanted to stay true to their old values, although they clearly stated in radio interviews at the time that they were all 100% behind the new direction, but, they must have also felt the pull of the prospect of more hit singles along the lines of free Me. There was no doubt of the influence the Bronze Organisation had in this new direction. (Source: Robert Corich, from "Time of Revelation" booklet)

The band has sold millions of records and have charted five albums in the U.S. Top 40.




MusicSRC.com-Music Videos

Uriah Heep - Firefly lyrics

My love lives at the end of a rainbow
One day I'm gonna fly there on a firefly
High above white angry water
With a love song in my heart

Someday, somehow I know I'm gonna get there
I've been patient for so long
All my daydreams seem so much nearer now
And I beg you hear my song

Firefly on your glowing wings I'll ride
Till I sit beside this dream of mine
Firefly, high on a risin' tide
Only wanna touch the things I've seen

Steppin' lightly from star to star
Cross a wilderness of blue
Wonderin' how much in love with me you are
'Cause I'm so much in love with you

Firefly, can you take me
I ain't had no lovin' lately
Firefly bring me love
To my new horizon
The one that I've still got my eyes on
my my firefly, Firefly, firefly, firefly

In my dreams you come to me
The answer to my prayer
As I begin to feel you warm my heart
I awake and you're not there

Now and then I see your eye
As the stars begin to shine
No rain to cool my passion
No! Not now!
No, now you're mine!


Uriah Heep Lyrics and Guitar Tabs:
Between Two Worlds
Bird Of Prey
Blind Eye
Come Back To Me
Circle Of Hands
Crime Of Passion
Easy Livin'
Echoes In The Dark
Fallen Angel
Feels Like
Fools
Footprints In The Snow
Free Me
Gypsy
Heartless Land
I Hear Voices
I'll Keep On Trying
It Ain't Easy
July Morning
Lady In Black
Look At Yourself
Love Machine
Love Or Nothing
Mistress Of All Time
Paradise/The Spell
Question NEW!
Rainbow Demon
Shelter From The Rain
Simon The Bullet Freak
Something Or Nothing
Stealin'
Sunrise
Sympathy
Sweet Lorraine
The Dance
The Magician's Birthday
The Park
The Shadows And The Wind
The Wizard
Time Of Revelation
Time To Live
Traveller In Time
Universal Wheels
We Got We
What Can I Do
Who Needs Me
Wise Man
(Source created by Per Rannug, Norway)

Uriah Heep Albums:


Easy Livin' The Ultimate Collection
Track List
[video] Return to Fantasy[video] Come Away Melinda[video] Bird of Prey[video] Lady in Black[video] Look at Yourself[video] July Morning[video] The Wizard[video] Easy Livin'[video] Sunrise[video] Too Scared to Run[video] Sweet Lorraine[video] Stealin'[video] Sweet Freedom[video] Wonderworld[video] Something or Nothing[video] That's The Way It Is[video] Gypsy[video] Magician's Birthday[video] Prima Donna[video] One Way or Another[video] Wise Man[video] Free Me[video] Free 'n' Easy[video] Come Back to Me[video] Fallen Angel[video] Feelings[video] Think It Over[video] On the Rebound[video] Stay on Top[video] The Other Side of Midnight[video] Hold Your Head Up[video] Blood Red Roses[video] Blood on Stone[video] Different World




Demons and Wizards
Release Date: January 23, 1989
Track List
[video] The Wizard[video] Traveller in Time[video] Easy Livin'[video] Poet's Justice[video] Circle of Hands[video] Rainbow Demon[video] All My Life[video] Paradise / The Spell




Salisbury
Release Date: September 18, 2001
Track List
[video] Bird of Prey[video] The Park[video] Time to Live[video] Lady in Black[video] High Priestess[video] Salisbury




Look at Yourself
Release Date: May 23, 2006
Track List
[video] Look at Yourself[video] I Wanna Be Free[video] July Morning[video] Tears in My Eyes[video] Shadows of Grief[video] What Should Be Done[video] Love Machine




The Magician's Birthday
Release Date: January 23, 1989
Track List
[video] Sunrise[video] Spider Woman[video] Blind Eye[video] Echoes in the Dark[video] Rain[video] Sweet Lorraine[video] Tales[video] The Magician's Birthday




Wake The Sleeper
Release Date: August 26, 2008
window.google_render_ad();
Track List
[video] Wake The Sleeper[video] Overload[video] Tears Of The World[video] Light Of A Thousand Stars[video] Heaven's Rain[video] Book Of Lies[video] What Kind Of God[video] Ghost Of The Ocean[video] Angels Walk With You[video] Shadow[video] War Child




Wonderworld
Release Date: January 02, 2006
Track List
[video] Wonderworld[video] Suicidal Man[video] The Shadows and the Wind[video] So Tired[video] The Easy Road[video] Something or Nothing[video] I Won't Mind[video] We Got We[video] Dreams[video] What Can I Do




The Best of Uriah Heep
Release Date: July 25, 1989
Track List
[video] Look at Yourself[video] Sunrise[video] Seven Stars[video] The Wizard[video] Gypsy[video] Why (single b-side)[video] Easy Livin'[video] Bird of Prey[video] Come Away Melinda[video] Traveller in Time[video] Sunshine (single b-side)[video] July Morning




Electrically Driven
Release Date: November 30, 2000
Track List
[video] Return to Fantasy[video] Universal Wheels[video] Bird of Prey[video] Stealin'[video] Between Two Worlds[video] I Hear Voices[video] Come Away Melinda[video] Circus[video] Blind Eye[video] Sunrise[video] Gypsy[video] July Morning[video] Easy Livin'




...Very 'Eavy ...Very 'Umble
Release Date: November 30, 1995
Track List
[video] Gypsy[video] Walking in Your Shadow[video] Come Away Melinda[video] Lucy Blues[video] Dreammare[video] Real Turned On[video] I'll Keep on Trying[video] Wake Up (Set Your Sights)[video] Gypsy (single version)[video] Come Away Melinda (alternate version)[video] Born in a Trunk (alternate version)




Sweet Freedom
Release Date: June 15, 2004
Track List
[video] Stealin'




Live January 1973
Release Date: July 25, 1989
Track List
[video] Introduction (live)[video] Sunrise (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] Sweet Lorraine (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] Traveller In Time (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] Easy Livin' (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] July Morning (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] Tears In My Eyes (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] Gypsy (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] Circle Of Hands (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] Look At Yourself (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] The Magician's Birthday (Live (1973/Birmingham, England))[video] Love Machine (Live (1973/Birmingham, England)




Firefly
Release Date: September 25, 2001
Track List
[video] Been Away Too Long[video] Sympathy[video] Who Needs Me[video] Wise Man[video] The Hanging Tree[video] Rollin'On[video] Do You Know[video] Firefly




Equator
Release Date: January 01, 1991
Track List
[video] Rockarama[video] Bad Blood[video] Lost One Love[video] Angel[video] Holding On[video] Party Time[video] Poor Little Rich Girl[video] Skools Burning[video] Heartache City[video] Night of the Wolf




Magic Night
Release Date: December 31, 2003
Track List
[video] Easy Livin'[video] Shadows of Grief[video] Cry Freedom[video] Pilgrim[video] Bad Bad Man[video] Devil's Daughter[video] Wise Man[video] Firefly[video] Heartless Land[video] Free Me[video] The Wizard[video] Love in Silence[video] Been Away Too Long[video] Stealin'[video] Too Scared to Run[video] The Other Side of Midnight




Return to Fantasy
Release Date: July 06, 2004
Track List
[video] Return to Fantasy[video] Shady Lady[video] Devil's Daughter[video] Beautiful Dream[video] Prima Donna[video] Your Turn to Remember[video] Showdown[video] Why Did You Go[video] A Year or A Day[video] Shout It Out (single b-side)[video] The Time Will Come (single b-side)[video] Prima Donna (demo version)[video] Why Did You Go (demo version)[video] Showdown (demo version)[video] Beautiful Dream (demo version)[video] Return to Fantasy (extended version)




The Ballads
Release Date: November 30, 1993
Track List
[video] Lady in Black[video] Free Me[video] What Should Be Done[video] Come Back to Me[video] Why Did You Go[video] Come Away Melinda[video] July Morning[video] The Wizard[video] Wonderworld[video] If I Had the Time[video] Circle of Hands[video] The Park[video] Wise Man[video] From Time to Time[video] A King Without a Throne[video] Rain[video] The Last Time




Innocent Victim
Release Date: June 30, 1992
Track List
[video] Keep on Ridin'[video] Flyin' High[video] Roller[video] Free 'n' Easy[video] Illusion[video] Free Me[video] Cheat 'n' Lie[video] The Dance[video] Choices[video] Illusion (full unedited version) / Masquerade (single b-side)[video] The River (out-take)[video] Put Your Music Where Your Mouth Is (out-take)[video] Cheat 'n' Lie (live version)[video] Free Me (live version)[video] Free 'n' Easy (live version)




Abominog
Release Date: April 19, 2005
Track List
[video] On the Rebound




Rock History: The Best of Uriah Heep (disc 1)
Release Date: November 30, 1994
Track List
[video] Stealin'[video] Gypsy[video] Easy Livin'[video] Spider Woman[video] Sweet Lorraine[video] Firefly[video] Love Machine[video] Running All Night (with the Lion)[video] Return to Fantasy[video] Love or Nothing[video] Echoes in the Dark[video] Look at Yourself[video] Shadows of Grief[video] Shady Lady[video] Dreamer




High and Mighty
Release Date: September 11, 2001
Track List
[video] One Way or Another[video] Weep in Silence[video] Misty Eyes[video] Midnight[video] Can't Keep a Good Band Down[video] Woman of the World[video] Footprints in the Snow[video] Cant Stop Singing[video] Make a Little Love[video] Confession[video] Name of the Game (out-take)[video] Sundown (out-take)




Sonic Origami
Release Date: July 06, 1999
Track List
[video] Between Two Worlds[video] I Hear Voices[video] Perfect Little Heart[video] Heartless Land[video] Only the Young[video] In the Moment[video] Question[video] Change[video] Shelter from the Rain[video] Everything in Life[video] Across the Miles[video] Feels Like[video] The Golden Palace[video] Sweet Pretender



Members of Uriah Heep:

1969-2007 1969-1970
David Byron vocals
Mick Box guitar
Ken Hensley keyboards
Paul Newton bass guitar
Alex Napier drums

1970
David Byron vocals
Mick Box guitar
Ken Hensley keyboards
Paul Newton bass guitar
Nigel Olsson drums

1970
David Byron vocals
Mick Box guitar
Ken Hensley keyboards
Paul Newton bass guitar
Keith Baker drums

1970-1971
David Byron vocals
Mick Box guitar
Ken Hensley keyboards
Paul Newton bass guitar
Iain Clarke drums

1971-1972
David Byron vocals
Mick Box guitar
Ken Hensley keyboards
Mark Clarke bass guitar
Lee Kerslake drums

1972-1975
David Byron vocals
Mick Box guitar
Ken Hensley keyboards
Gary Thain bass guitar
Lee Kerslake drums

1975-1976
David Byron vocals
Mick Box guitar
Ken Hensley keyboards
John Wetton bass guitar
Lee Kerslake drums

1976-1979
John Lawton vocals
Mick Box guitar
Ken Hensley keyboards
Trevor Bolder bass guitar
Lee Kerslake drums



Line-Up:
Mick Box, Ken Hensley, John Sloman, Trevor Bolder, Chris Slade
Image by heepfiles.com




1979-1980
John Sloman vocals
Mick Box guitar
Ken Hensley keyboards
Trevor Bolder bass guitar
Chris Slade drums

1980-1981
John Sloman vocals
Mick Box guitar
Gregg Dechert keyboards
Trevor Bolder bass guitar
Chris Slade drums

1981-1982 Disbanded 1982-1983
Peter Goalby vocals
Mick Box guitar
John Sinclair keyboards
Bob Daisley bass guitar
Lee Kerslake drums

1983-1985
Peter Goalby vocals
Mick Box guitar
John Sinclair keyboards
Trevor Bolder bass guitar
Lee Kerslake drums



Line-Up:
Mick Box, John Sinclair, Peter Goalby, Bob Daisley, Lee Kerslake
Image by heepfiles.com




1986
Steff Fontaine vocals
Mick Box guitar
Phil Lanzon keyboards
Trevor Bolder bass guitar
Lee Kerslake drums

1986-2007
Bernie Shaw vocals
Mick Box guitar
Phil Lanzon keyboards
Trevor Bolder bass guitar
Lee Kerslake drums

2007
Bernie Shaw vocals
Mick Box guitar
Phil Lanzon keyboards
Trevor Bolder bass guitar
Russell Gilbrook drums

Current Members:
Mick Box : Lead guitar/vocals 1969-present
Lee Kerslake : Drums/vocals 1972-1979 and 1982-present
Bernie Shaw : Lead vocals 1986-present
Trevor Bolder : Bass guitar/vocals 1976-1981 and 1983-present
Phil Lanzon : Keyboards/vocals 1986-present



Keith "MuzikMan" Hannaleck wrote: 'Mick Box is always smiling and the core leader as he always has been. I think if it were not for his steadfast influence and attitude this band would have never survived all the lineup changes over the years. The man has good reason to smile, after all these years his is still able to do what he loves, be paid, and absorb the adulation of his fans.



Mick Box
Image by heepfiles.com





Mike Box
Picture made by Bill Parsons 1975





Mike Box
Image made by Bill Parsons 1975



The key to this band’s success besides their longevity is the fact that all the members sing and play, that is a huge asset and one that makes them as diverse and strong as a unit. That kind of continuity is difficult to find with equally talented people in the same group, and to maintain it is another challenge. His was a magic night and now one immortalized forever for us all to enjoy repeatedly. Ain’t life grand? It is in my world because I can still enjoy listening to one the best bands in the world and one of my all time favorites, and I don’t have to feel middle aged doing it, now that’s one of the sweet things of life to treasure”. And Blackie Lawless of W.A.S.P wrote, “Ken Hensley wrote the rulebook for heavy metal keyboards....”



Ken Hensley
1973 Japan Tour Program
Image by heepfiles.com





Ken Hensley
Image by Charlie Gibb Picturebook 1974





Ken Hensley
Image by Charlie Gibb Picturebook 1974





Ken Hensley 1975
Image by heepfiles.com





Most feel that if were not the writing of Ken Hensley, nobody would have noiced Uriah Heep initially, but the opposite side of the coin must be flipped here. The voice in our ears and the messenger of the words were David Byron's.



David Byron
1973 Japan Tour Program
Image from heepfiles.com





David Byron
Image from Charlie Gibb's Picturebook 1974





David Byron
Image by Bill Parsons 1975





David Byron
Image from heepfiles.com





He could bring a tear to your eyes with Sweet Freedom, make you laugh with comments in between tracks on Live '73 or just mystify you with his voice in Paradise. Few peers exist in the history of rock with his stage presence, his attitude, his charisma. (© 2005-2008 McWitherman Productions)
And Uriah Heep is still touring and playing music. The only original member left is Mick Box, and he assembled a merry band of musicians who do the Uriah Heep legacy proud.

Thursday, August 21, 2008

TINTED GLASSES

Every faculty in one man is the measure by which he judges of the like faculty in another. I judge your sight by my sight, of your ear by my ear, of your reason by my reason, of your resentment by my resentment, of your love by my love. I neither have, any other way of judging about them.
It's as if we all are wearing tinted glasses, the particular tint of your glasses being a function of your upbringing and cultural background. People from different culture have glasses that are tinted different colors from ours. Consequently their view of reality will be different. The catch is this. No one can take off their glasses and see reality as it really is in itself. No one can view truth or reality, except through the distorting lenses of their own cultural biases. Some claim that those who believe in moral absolutes are simply blind to the cultural influences that have shaped their ethical opinions. Others think that they can view reality as it is in itself, when in fact they can only see a prejudicial and subjective view of reality. Since we are incapable of freeing ourselves from the cultural influences that have shaped our ethical views, what kind of judgments should we form about other culture . We should stop pretending that our ethical judgments and opinions reflect anything more than the contingent historical forces that have shaped our lives.
Though his books on Pyrrhonism, Aenesidemus promote the suspension of judgment (epoche) by contrasting:
'Gunpowder in water does not act the same gunpowder next a flame. A fact known does not operate the same as a fact unperceived. When it is known, it comes into contact with the flame of desire and the cold bath of antipathy. For how could one say, with regard to touch, (for example) that animals are similarly affected whether their surfaces consist shell, flesh, needles, feathers or scales? And as regards hearing, how could one say that ‘perceptions are alike’ in animals with a very narrow auditory canal and in those with a very wide one, or in those with hairy ears and in those with ears that are hairless… Perfume seems very pleasant to human beings but intolerable to dung beetles and bees, and the application of olive oil a beneficial to human beings but kills wasps and bees. Pictures seem to the sense of sight to have concavities and convexities, for example, but not to the touch, and let us imagine someone who from birth has…lacked hearing and sight. He will start out believing the existence of nothing visible or audible, but only of the three kinds of quality he can register. It is therefore a possibility that we too, having only five senses, only register from the qualities belonging to the apple those which we are capable of registering. But it may be that there objectively exist other qualities. Lamplight appears dim in sunlight but bright in the dark. The same oar appears bent in water but straight when out of it. The same sound appears one way when accompanied by a rarefied atmosphere, another way when accompanied by a dense atmosphere. The individual fillings of a piece of silver appear black, but when united with the whole they affect us as white. Since all things are relative, we will suspend judgment about what things exist absolutely and in nature. The sun is certainly a much more marvelous thing than a comet. But since we see the sun all the time but the comet only infrequently, we marvel at the comet so much as even to suppose it a divine portent but we do nothing like that for the sun. If, however, we thought of the sun as appearing infrequently and setting infrequently, and illuminating everything all at once and suddenly are eclipsed, we should find much to marvel at in the matter.'
Things sweet in anticipation are bitter in actual taste; things we now turn from in aversion are welcome at in another moment in our career. Independently of deep changes in character, such as from mercifulness to callousness, from fretfulness to cheerfulness, there are unavoidable changes in the waxing and waning of activity. What a man foresees and fails to foresee, what he appraises highly and at a lower rate, what he deems important and trivial, what he dwells upon and what he slurs over, what he easily recalls and what he naturally forgets … all of these things depend upon his character. Everybody lives within his or her own world. Of course ‘my world’ has much in common with your world but even those common things appear a little bit different for me and for you. The reason is that everything becomes content of our mind, but not for everybody in the same way. In practice, our dealing with our daily experiences is strictly personal. It is dependent on our inborn disposition and the quality of our abilities. The result is unique for every individual. And most important is that the circumstances in which we live are more or less different, even if two so-called identical twins grow up in the same family and at the same moment.
Man’s loyalty to his own ideology or ideas makes him a slave of his own thinking about reality. This slavery makes it impossible to run his life in a free and inventive way. His principles urge him constantly to act in accordance with the criteria of his idealistic blueprint. Regularly you meet people of principle with high ideals. They seem to live with high human standards but in practice it appears to be nothing but unfeeling theory. Almost everyone has some intolerance and an obstinate attitude towards other ideas and opinions. They are blinkered so that they cannot see that there are many ways to live to a good life. Such behavior again is a proof of the negative effects of valuing ideas and making ideals and ideologies of them. Perceptions, which seem to reveal the true nature of the world, are opposed by invoking perceptions, which seem to demonstrate the limits of perception.
There are however vices of reflection as well as of impulse. We may not look far enough ahead because we are hurried into action by stress of impulse: but we may also become over interested in the delights of reflection: We become afraid of assuming the responsibilities of decisive choice and action, and in general be sicklied over by a pale cast of thought. We may become so curious about remote and abstract matters that we give only a begrudged, impatient attention to the things right about us. We may fancy we are glorifying the love of truth for its own sake when we are only indulging a pet occupation and slighting demands of the immediate situation. Our forecast of consequences is always subject, to the bias of impulse and habit. We see what we want to see, we obscure what is unfavorable to a cherished, probably avowed, wish.

Acknowledgment:
Leo Groarke, 'Ancient Skepticism', 1997
Jan Vis, 'The significant of things', Philosophical Reflections.
James R. Bebes, Department of Philosophy, 'Ethical Relativism', 2003

Monday, August 18, 2008

THE GOLDEN BEAR

For over four decades Jack Nicklaus has been one of the greatest players to ever pick up a club. The man known as the Golden Bear is one of only five golfers to ever win all four major tournaments. But more than that, Nicklaus remained dominant in the sport for nearly three decades, with twenty-five years separating his first and last Masters win. He consistently returned to top form and won an incredible 20 major victories in his career. By the time he left the professional tour, Nicklaus amassed an amazing 71 PGA tour wins, with 58 second place and 36 third place finishes. He has ... been voted PGA Tour Player of the year five times (1967, 1972-73, 1975-76). Jack William Nicklaus began playing golf at the age of 10 and before becoming a professional in late 1961 was considered by many the greatest amateur golfer since Bobby Jones. In his first year as a professional in 1962 he defeated Arnold Palmer in the U.S. Open and won the first World Series of Golf.
Born Jan. 21, 1940, Columbus, Ohio, U.S. he is one of the greatest in the game's history. He won the U.S. Amateur Championship twice (1959, 1961) while attending Ohio State University. After turning professional in 1962, he won the U.S. Open four times (1962, 1967, 1972, 1980), the Masters Tournament six times (1963, 1965, 1966, 1972, 1975, 1986), the PGA Championship five times (1963, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1980), and the British Open three times (1966, 1970, 1978). He was a member of the winning U.S. World Cup team six times and was a record three-time individual World Cup winner (1963, 1964, 1971). By 1986 “the Golden Bear” had played in 100 major championships, finishing in the top three 45 times. He combined skill and power with remarkable concentration and composure under pressure.

Nineteen-year old Jack Nicklaus won his first major championship
– the 1959 U.S. Amateur at Broadmoor Golf Club in Colorado Springs Colorado
– and received the admiration and congratulations
from his opponent and defending champion Charlie Coe.
(Photo signed by Jack Nicklaus, Charlie Coe and the artist Greg Rudd)

As he walked up the 18th green with a two-shot lead,tears began to fill his eyes,
the emotions of another British Open winat the Old Course swirling in his head.
That's when his caddie, Jimmy Dickinson,jabbed Nicklaus in the ribs
and said simply, "There's still some golf left"
Text: Mike McAllister/SI.comPhoto: John Iacono/SI

Jack Nicklaus was quoted as saying: "I never went into a tournament or round of golf thinking I had to beat a certain player. I had to beat the golf course. If I prepared myself for a major, went in focused, and then beat the golf course, the rest took care of itself. Jones is the greatest golfer who ever lived and probably ever will live. That's my goal. Bobby Jones. It's the only goal. I guess it could be said my legacy might be that I changed an era. I came along during an era where the game of golf was more of a stylish game, and I added power to the game. I was probably the first player that played with real power and was successful. And I was able to play with finesse as well. If you look at today's player, they all play with power. So I think I took the game in a different direction. I'm a firm believer that in the theory that people only do their best at things they truly enjoy. It is difficult to excel at something you don't enjoy. The Masters and Augusta National are and always have been very special to me. From the first time I drove up Magnolia Lane at age 19, I had a special feeling about Augusta. Even today, I get chills driving up Magnolia Lane. Learn the fundamentals of the game and stick to them. Band-Aid remedies never last. My ability to concentrate and work toward that goal has been my greatest asset. The older you get the stronger the wind gets - and it's always in your face."
Great players were quoted as saying about Jack Nicklaus: Arnold Palmer, in 1962, after losing the U.S. Open to 22-year-old Nicklaus in a playoff: "Now that the big guy's out of the cage, everybody better run for cover." Bobby Jones after watching Nicklaus win the 1965 Masters: "Nicklaus played a game with which I am not familiar." Author Rick Reilly: "He was not homespun like Sam Snead, funny like Lee Trevino. His pants didn't need hitching like Palmer's. Instead, he won over America with pure, unbleached excellence." Chi Chi Rodriguez: "Jack Nicklaus is a legend in his spare time." Gene Sarazen: "I never thought anyone would ever put Hogan in the shadows, but he did." Tom Weiskopf: "Jack knew he was going to beat you. You knew Jack was going to beat you. And Jack knew that you knew that he was going to beat you.
Jack Nicklaus won 73 times on the PGA tour, but there are wins and then there are wins. Of all those victories, which are the greatest of Nicklaus' career? It's narrowed it down to the Top 5. Greatest Jack Nicklaus Top 6 Victories are:

1. 1986 Masters
This win wasn't as important to Nicklaus' career as the 1962 U.S. Open (below), but nobody who watched the 1986 Masters will ever forget it. For emotional power, this might be the greatest win any golfer has ever had. At age 46, Nicklaus hadn't won a major in nearly six years when he put together a stunning back-nine 30 for a final-round of 65 and his sixth Green Jacket. It was the final win of Nicklaus' PGA Tour career.

If you watched this historic moment in 1986 on TV or in person, you will never forget the roar of the crowdas Jack Nicklaus made this putt to winat the ''old'' age of 46. Bring this memory home,immortalized in this awe inspiring photographby Frank Christian.


The Associated Press photo (above) captures Nicklaus on the lip of his definingmoment,his tongue jutting out in Air Jordan form his gloved hand prematurelylifting his sword,and his ball about to make like a field mousedisappearing into a void.The man was 46 that day,and he made everyone watching feel half their age ( Ian O'Connor)


At 46, Nicklaus was well past his prime,having given way to Watson, Ballesteros and the rest.At least that's the way it seemed. But at the 1986 Masters, the magic returned.Nicklaus put on a show for the ages,winning his 18th and final professional major.Text: Mike McAllister/SI.comPhoto: John Iacono/SI

Bernhard Langer presents Jack Nicklauswith his 6th Green Jacket for his win in the 1986 Masters.

2. 1962 U.S. Open
It wasn't just his first major, it was Nicklaus' first professional victory of any kind. And it wasn't just that he did it, but how he did it: beating the King, Arnold Palmer, in an 18-hole playoff on Palmer's home turf (Oakmont in Pennsylvania). Said Palmer: "Now that the big guy's out of the cage, everybody better run for cover." Nicklaus also had to beat Arnie's Army, some of whose members taunted Jack with catcalls of "fatso" throughout the tournament.

3. 1965 Masters
Golf's Big 3 - Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Gary Player - finished 1-t2-t2 this year, but it wasn't even close: Nicklaus won by a then-record 9 strokes with a then-record 271 total. Nicklaus overpowered Augusta National, leading Bobby Jones to utter his famous remark about Jack's power: "He plays a game with which I am not familiar."

Taken in their heyday –golf’s “Big Three” harkens back to the rivalrythat define golf in the 1960s and 70s.

Nicklaus, Palmer, and Player at Firestone Country Club in September 6, 1962.

Arnold Palmer is shown giving Jack Nicklaus his second Masters jacket on April 11, 1965 .Nicklaus established a new tournament scoring record.

Jack Nicklaus (in his Green Jacket) gets congratulations from Arnold Palmer,Gary Player (tied for 2nd), Downing Gray, Clifford Roberts, and Bobby Jonesfor his win at the 1965 Masters.

Jack Nicklaus is the first to present the Green Jacket to himself,as consecutive winner for 1965 and 1966 Masters tournaments.

4. 1975 Masters
Many people consider the 1975 Masters the greatest in that tournament's history. It featured three great players at the top of the leaderboard and at the top of their games: Nicklaus, Johnny Miller and Tom Weiskopf. Miller and Weiskopf were in the final group, Nicklaus one group ahead. And when Nicklaus snaked in a seemingly impossible 40-foot birdie putt on No. 16 - as Miller and Weiskopf watched from the tee - it carried Nicklaus to his fifth Green Jacket.

Jack Nicklaus egging on a putt during the Masters - 1975.

Jack Nicklaus celebrating at the 1975 Masters.

Jack Nicklaus poses during the U. S. Open at the Riviera - 1975.

5. (tie) 1967 and 1980 U.S. Opens
At the 1967 U.S. Open, Nicklaus shot 65 in the final round to post a record-breaking 275 total. He beat Arnold Palmer by four shots, with Billy Casper and Lee Trevino also left in his wake. In 1980, Nicklaus - who hadn't won in nearly two years - roared out of the gate with a 63 and set a new record (which still stands, since tied by two others) with a 272 total. "Jack is Back" went up on the scoreboard.

6. Honorable Mention: 1978 Jackie Gleason Inverarry Classic
Take your pick from among Nicklaus' 11 other major championships. But we'll throw out just one of Nicklaus' non-major victories: the 1978 Jackie Gleason Inverarry Classic. Why? Because Jack came from behind to win by birdying the final five holes in.

Jack Nicklaus had many great years on the PGA Tour. He was a 5-time Player of the Year, 8-time money leader and 8-time scoring leader. He won 73 times, including 18 majors. There are a lot of great seasons from which to choose. (Note: While Nicklaus led the Tour in scoring average eight times, he never won the Vardon Trophy because of eligibility requirements in place at the time. Later in his career, this was due to too few rounds played.)Jack Nicklaus Top 5 Seasons on the PGA Tour are:

1. 1972
Nicklaus' single-season best for PGA Tour wins was seven, and this one of those years. He finished second three times and in the Top 10 in 14 out of 19 tournaments played. Nicklaus won The Masters and the U.S. Open in 1972, but his Grand Slam quest was stopped by Lee Trevino at the British Open, where Jack finished one stroke back in second place. He was named Player of the Year and led in scoring and money. He tied Bobby Jones this year with his 13th major (including amateur majors).

In 1972, Jack Nicklaus won at Augusta, then captured the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach,proudly displaying the hardware here. That gave him 13 career majors(including U.S. Amateurs), tying him with Bobby Jones at the top of the list.Text: Mike McAllister/SI.comPhoto: John Iacono/SI


A close-up of Jack Nicklausholding his trophy for his 1972 U. S. Open win at Pebble Beach.

2. 1973
It was obvious in 1962 that Jack Nicklaus would be a superstar. This year, 1963, was when he became a supersNicklaus finished in the Top 10 in 16 of the 18 PGA Tour events he played. That included all majors: he won the PGA, was third at The Masters, and fourth at the U.S. and British opens. He won seven times total on Tour, plus one second and one third. Nicklaus led in scoring and money and was named Player of the Year. The PGA Championship was his 14th major (counting amateurs), breaking Bobby Jones' record. He also had a great Ryder Cup, going 4-1-1, and won the World Cup with Johnny Miller.

3. 1963
Nicklaus won five Tour events - including The Masters and PGA Championship - and finished in the Top 10 in 17 of 25 events played. He had two runner-up finishes and three thirds (including at the British Open). The Tournament of Champions was another of his big wins, plus he won the World Series of Golf (a non-Tour event).

4.1971
Nicklaus was in the Top 10 in 15 of the 18 Tour events he played. That included a win at the PGA Championship, runner-up finishes at The Masters and U.S. Open, and 5th at the British Open. He won 5 Tour events, with 3 seconds and 3 thirds. He won the money title and led in scoring, and became the first player in history with the Double Career Grand Slam (winning each major at least twice). He had his best Ryder Cup (5-1-0) and paired with Arnold Palmer to win the National Team Championship.

Jack Nicklaus kneels as partner Arnold Palmer looks over his shoulderwhile they study a putt on 18th green on Saturday at Laurel Valley Golf Clubat the PGA National Team Championship in Ligonier, Pa.The defending champions finished the second round16-under-par for the lead -July 31, 1972.

5. 1975
This was another of Nicklaus' 2-major seasons. He won The Masters and the PGA Championship, and also finished 7th at the U.S. Open and third at the British Open. He won five Tour events total (including Doral and the World Open), and finished in the Top 10 in 14 of the 16 tournaments he played. He led in money and scoring average, and also won the Australian Open. The Masters win was his fifth (setting a record) and the Top Near-Misses by Jack Nicklaus in Majors.

Jack Nicklaus won a record 18 professional major championships. But he also finished second in 19 more majors! Yes, that's a record, too. That's a lot of runner-up finishes for the Golden Bear, and some of those second-places came in tournaments that are now legendary. Nicklaus himself wouldn't consider these "great" accomplishments, but he would appreciate the greatness of the moments in golf history. Here are the Top 5 Near-Misses in Majors by Jack Nicklaus:

1. 1977
British Open Nicklaus and Tom Watson square off in "The Duel in the Sun" at Turnberry, perhaps the greatest one-on-one battle in golf history. Playing together the final two rounds, they play flawlessly. Nicklaus shoots 66-66, but Watson goes 66-65 to win by one. At the final hole, Nicklaus has a very long and difficult birdie putt while Watson is in close. "I think we've got him now," Watson's caddie said. "No, he's going to make this," Watson replied. Jack did, but Watson sank his short one for the win.

2. 1982 U.S. Open
"That S.O.B. did it to me again," Nicklaus said of Tom Watson (in admiration, not anger) after the 1982 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. Nicklaus was on the verge of a record-setting fifth U.S. Open, in the clubhouse with the lead. Watson, the only player who could beat Nicklaus, was in deep rough off the 17th green, a near-impossible chip. And Watson holed it. Nicklaus has called this his toughest loss.

3. 1960 U.S. Open
Still an amateur (as he would be for another two years), Nicklaus finished alone in second with a score of 282, still the lowest score ever shot in a U.S. Open by an amateur. His 71 was OK, but Arnold Palmer scorched Cherry Hills with a 65, coming from 7 shots off the pace to nip Nicklaus by two. Nicklaus played the final round with Ben Hogan, who said after the round, "Today, I played with the young man who should have won the U.S. Open."


Jack Nicklaus, 1959 National Amateur Championsitting on bench with one leg up during the Masters - 1960.

4. 1972 British Open
Nicklaus began 1972, his greatest year on the PGA Tour, by winning the first two majors, The Masters and U.S. Open. His dream of the Grand Slam was alive heading to the British Open. Nicklaus trailed Lee Trevino by six shots entering the fourth round at treacherous Carnoustie, then posted a 66 to take the clubhouse lead. Trevino was in trouble on the 17th, but improbably chipped in for par. Another par on 18 and Trevino had stopped Nicklaus' Grand Slam quest by one stroke.

5. 1971 U.S. Open
Lee Trevino was as much a nemesis to Nicklaus in the early '70s as Watson was in the late '70s and early '80s. Trevino and Nicklaus tangled in an 18-hole playoff at the U.S. Open in 1971, which Trevino won 68 to 71. This tournament is famous for the snake incise. Nicklaus retired from tournament play in 2005 with 73 PGA wins—a number exceeded only by Sam Snead with 82—and a record 18 major professional championship titles.He is currently a golf course architect, in partnership with his sons and son-in-law through Nicklaus Design, and is personally responsible for over 200 golf course designs. These include Muirfield Village, Shoal Creek, Castle Pines and the PGA Centenary Course at the Gleneagles Hotel. Nicklaus partnered with Pete Dye to create Harbor Town, on Hilton Head Island.As successful as Nicklaus was on the course, his life off it left him equally fulfilled. He and wife Barbara had five children: Jackie, Steve, Nancy, Gary and Michael. Twice, the Nicklaus clan received Golf Family of the Year honors. When Jack lost a 17-month-old grandson in a tragic accident in early 2005, he helped bring some normalcy back to his family by playing in the Masters one last time.

SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR- JACK NICKLAUS


Acknowledgment:

The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition 2008

1994-2008 Encyclopedia Britannica

Inc.2008 About .com, a part of The New York Times

CompanySportsillustrated.comGolflegends.org

Other Image Copyright held by The Ron Watts Collection, HISTORIC GOLF PHOTOS