Wednesday, January 21, 2009

CREATION OF TALES



Official US Presidential Portrait of Barack Obama
taken shortly before he assumed office
Source: change.gov, Date January 13, 2009
Author Pete Souza, The Obama-Biden Transition Project


Senator Barack Husein Obama, 47, of Illinois was elected president of the United States and the nation’s first black commander in chief, his triumph ushering in an era of profound political and social realignment in America.
A 47-year-old first-term senator from Illinois, he shattered more than 200 years of history Tuesday night, November 5, 2008 by winning election as the first African-American president of the United States.
And across the world, people were celebrating the presidential inauguration and Barack Obama was sworn in as America's 44th, and first black, president.


Barack Obama inauguration
The world celebrates the president's swearing in
Picture: GETTY
© Copyright of Telegraph Media Group Limited 2009


Barack Obama was sworn in as the 44th US president
by Chief Justice of the United States
John G. Roberts, Jr. in Washington, D.C.
Source: defenseimagery.mil
Date January 20, 2009
Author Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo, U.S. Air Force
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Obama’s decisive victory over Republican John McCain was a landmark in the country’s 232-year history, especially for the millions of African-Americans around the country energized and inspired by his improbable candidacy. It gives Democrats control of Congress and the White House for the first time in 16 years and it led to impromptu celebrations around the country.

Barack Obama delivering his electoral victory speech
Election Night ´08, in Grant Park, Chicago
Date November 4th, 2008
Author Gabbec
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Making good on his promise to draw his own electoral map, Obama captured Virginia, which last voted for a Democrat in 1964, and he beat McCain in key battlegrounds, including Florida, New Hampshire, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, while holding on to Democratic-leaning states. He won in part on the support of new voters, African-Americans, and Hispanics, and as of November 5, 2008 he had 338 electoral votes, far more than the 270 needed to win the presidency, while McCain had 142.
Obama’s win, which comes as Democrats also picked up seats in the House and Senate, sets the stage for significant shifts in the country’s domestic and foreign policy in the years ahead. It was a fitting final bend of the arc of a presidential race Obama has run largely on his own terms since winning the Iowa caucuses on January 3,2008.



The Road To Presidency
© 2008 YouTube, LLC


He set the fund-raising pace, bringing in a record $639 million. He set out early to play offense by competing in ‘‘red states’’ such as Colorado, North Carolina, and Virginia, a strategy helped by independent demographic trends that favored the Democrats. The general election battle was fought almost exclusively over change, terrain that Obama seized early and never relinquished. Obama became the first presidential candidate to reject public financing, choosing instead to rely on his millions of donors — many of them giving $5 or $10 online.
In his victory speech, Obama issued a call for bipartisanship, speaking to the millions of voters who did not support him. "I may not have won your vote tonight," he said. "But I hear your voices. I need your help. I will be your president, too."
By Scott Helman and Michael Kranish, Globe Staff
Posted by Foon Rhee, deputy national political editor November 5, 2008 01:25 AM at boston.com © 2009 NY Times Co.

Barack Obama and Michelle Obama
Source:flickr.com
Date 2008-01-07
Author Luke Vargas 2008 edited by Muhammad
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


"The Future First Family Waves"
Springfield, Illinois, USA.
Obama's family was on hand for the announcement
Source: flickr.com
Date Photo taken on February 10, 2007.
Author acaben at Flickr




Signs of Hope & Change: Election Night
© 2008 YouTube, LLC


Obama is a graduate of Columbia University and Harvard Law School, where he was the first African-American president of the Harvard Law Review. He worked as a community organizer, and practiced as a civil rights attorney in Chicago before serving three terms in the Illinois Senate from 1997 to 2004. He also taught Constitutional Law at the University of Chicago Law School from 1992 to 2004. Following an unsuccessful bid for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2000, Obama was elected to the Senate in November 2004. Obama delivered the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in July 2004.
Of his early childhood, Obama has recalled, "That my father looked nothing like the people around me — that he was black as pitch, my mother white as milk — barely registered in my mind." In his 1995 memoir, he described his struggles as a young adult to reconcile social perceptions of his multiracial heritage. He wrote that he used alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine during his teenage years to "push questions of who I was out of my mind". At the 2008 Civil Forum on the Presidency, Obama identified his high-school drug use as his "greatest moral failure."
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

"Birth Certificate of Barack Obama"
Department of Health, Hawaii
PolitiFact.com (August 8, 1961)
Retrieved on 2008-12-12
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


In June 2008, the Obama campaign released a digitally scanned image of his birth certificate to quell speculative charges that he might not be a natural-born citizen. But the image prompted more blog-based skepticism about the document's authenticity. And recently, author Jerome Corsi, whose book attacks Obama, said in a TV interview that the birth certificate the campaign has is "fake."
We beg to differ. FactCheck.org staffers have now seen, touched, examined and photographed the original birth certificate. We conclude that it meets all of the requirements from the State Department for proving U.S. citizenship. Claims that the document lacks a raised seal or a signature are false. We have posted high-resolution photographs of the document as "supporting documents" to this article. Our conclusion: Obama was born in the U.S.A. just as he has always said.
(Update, Nov. 1: The director of Hawaii’s Department of Health confirmed Oct. 31 that Obama was born in Honolulu at
Copyright © 2003 - 2009, Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania)



A Mother's Promise: Barack's Biography
© 2008 YouTube, LLC


In a 2006 interview, Obama highlighted the diversity of his extended family. "Michelle will tell you that when we get together for Christmas or Thanksgiving, it's like a little mini-United Nations." he said. "I've got relatives who look like Bernie Mac, and I've got relatives who look like Margaret Thatcher." Obama has seven half-siblings from his Kenyan father's family, six of them living, and a half-sister with whom he was raised, Maya Soetoro-Ng, the daughter of his mother and her Indonesian second husband. Obama's mother was survived by her Kansas-born mother, Madelyn Dunham[181] until her death on November 2, 2008, just before the presidential election. In Dreams from My Father, Obama ties his mother's family history to possible Native American ancestors and distant relatives of Jefferson Davis, president of the southern Confederacy during the American Civil War.
Tuesday 20 January 2009 22.42 GMT, Barack Hussein Obama was sworn in as 44th president of the United States of America in front of quite possibly the largest mass of humanity ever to have gathered in one place for a single political moment.



Obama's Journey Begins
© 2008 YouTube, LLC



Russell Simmons On Obama
© 2008 YouTube, LLC



Preparation For The Big Day
© 2008 YouTube, LLC



Security Tight As Ever
© 2008 YouTube, LLC


As many as 2 million people in ­Washington's National Mall heard their new commander-in-chief deliver a sombre 20-minute speech in which he acknowledged that the country was in the midst of crisis – mired in wars, its economy struggling and its national confidence sapped. He promised the largely silent crowd that the challenges would be met, but warned it would take time, some sacrifice, a new form of politics and a re-engagement with the world, in which America would recognise that "power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please".
(By Alan Rusbridger in Washington guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 20 January 2009 22.42 GMT Article history at guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009)



Obama's Global Message
© 2008 YouTube, LLC


When Barack Obama steps up to the podium to deliver his inaugural address, one man standing anonymously in the crowd will be paying especially close attention. With his cropped hair, five o'clock shadow and boyish face, he might look out of place among the dignitaries, though as co-author of the speech this man has more claim than most to be a witness to this moment of history.
Jon Favreau, 27, is, as Obama himself puts it, the president's mind reader. He is the youngest chief speechwriter on record in the White House, and, despite such youth, was at the centre of discussions of the content of today's speech, one which has so much riding on it.
For a politician whose rise to prominence was largely built upon his powers as an orator, Obama is well versed in the arts of speech-making. But today's effort will tower over all previous ones.
(By Ed Pilkington in New York The Guardian, Tuesday 20 January 2009 Article history at guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009)



A Feeling Of Good Will
© 2008 YouTube, LLC



The Day After The Inauguration
© 2008 YouTube, LLC


In December 2008, Time magazine named Barack Obama as its Person of the Year for his historic candidacy and election, which it described as "the steady march of seemingly impossible accomplishments."

The President-elect
The Presidents of the United States of America
From whitehouse.gov

"Barack Obama: Creation of Tales"
Obama (1995, 2004), pp. 9–10. For book excerpts, see East African (2004-11-01). Retrieved on 13 April 2008. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007.




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