Monday, March 30, 2009

AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM





William Merritt Chase
American impressionist painter
Date 1900
Author Unidentified photographer
From From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


William Merritt Chase (November 1, 1849 – October 25, 1916) was an American painter known as an exponent of Impressionism and as a teacher. He was born in Williamsburg (now Nineveh), Indiana, to the family of a local merchant. Chase's father moved the family to Indianapolis in 1861 and employed his son as a salesman in the family business. Chase showed an early interest in art, and studied under local, self-taught artists Barton S. Hays and Jacob Cox.
After a brief stint in the Navy, Chase's teachers urged him to travel to New York to further his artistic training. He arrived in New York in 1869, met and studied with Joseph Oriel Eaton for a short time, then enrolled in the National Academy of Design under Lemuel Wilmarth, a student of the famous French artist Jean-Léon Gérôme.
In 1870 declining family fortunes forced Chase to leave New York for St. Louis, Missouri, where his family was then based. Chase's talent elicited the interest of wealthy St. Louis collectors who arranged for him to visit Europe for two years, in exchange for paintings and Chase's help in securing European art for their collections. In Europe Chase settled at the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, a long-standing center of art training that was attracting increasing numbers of Americans. He studied under Alexander Von Wagner and Karl von Piloty, and befriended American artists Walter Shirlaw, Frank Duveneck, and J(oseph) Frank Currier.
Chase worked in all media. He was most fluent in oil painting and pastel, but also created watercolor paintings and etchings. He is perhaps best known for his portraits, his sitters including some of the most important men and women of his time in addition to his own family. Chase often painted his wife Alice and their children, sometimes in individual portraits, and other times in scenes of domestic tranquility: at breakfast in their backyard, or relaxing at their summer home on Long Island, the children playing on the floor or among the sand dunes of Shinnecock.


Study in Pink aka Portrait of Mrs. Robert P. McDougal
Oil on canvas, 1895
54 1/2 x 36 inches (138.43 x 91.44 cm)
Public collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


A Study aka The Artist's Wife
Oil on canvas, 1892
20 x 16 inches (50.8 x 40.64 cm)
Public collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Self Portrait
Oil on canvas, 1915
52 1/2 x 63 1/2 inches (133.4 x 161.3 cm)
Art Association of Richmond
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Portrait of Louis Betts
Oil on canvas
20 x 15 7/8 inches (50.8 x 40.6 cm)
Private collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Memories
Oil on canvas
50 1/2 x 37 inches (128.27 x 93.98 cm)
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute Museum of Art, Utica
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


In addition to painting portraits and full-length figurative works, Chase began painting landscapes in earnest in the late 1880s. His interest in landscape art may have been spawned by the landmark New York exhibit of French impressionist works from Parisian dealer Durand-Ruel in 1886.


Idle Hours, 1894
William Merritt Chase
Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth
Texas
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Chase is best remembered for two series of landscape subjects, both painted in an impressionist manner. The first was his scenes of Prospect Park, Brooklyn and Central Park in New York:


Boat House, Prospect Park
Oil on board, 1887
10 1/8 x 15 7/8 inches (26.0 x 40.6 cm)
Collection of Meg Newhouse
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Prospect Park
Oil on canvas, 1886
Public collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Terrace, Prospect Park
Pastel on paper, c.1886
National Museum of American Art
Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


The second were his summer landscapes at Shinnecock. Chase usually featured people prominently in his landscapes. Often he depicted woman and children in leisurely poses, relaxing on a park bench, on the beach, or lying in the summer grass at Shinnecock. The Shinnecock works in particular have come to be thought of by art historians as particularly fine examples of American Impressionism.


Alice in the Shinnecock Studio
Oil on canvas, c.1900
38 1/8 x 42 3/4 inches (96.84 x 108.59 cm)
Public collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Shinnecock Hills
Oil on canvas, c.1893
34 5/8 x 39 3/4 inches (88 x 101 cm)
Public collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Shinnecock Hills from Canoe Place, Long Island
Oil on canvas
17 1/2 x 27 1/4 inches (44.45 x 69.22 cm)
Public collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


William Merritt Chase (1849-1916)
Sunny Afternoon, Shinnecock Hills
Oil on panel, 1898
12 x 15 inches (30.48 x 38.1 cm)
Public collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Chase continued to paint still lifes as he had done since his student days. Decorative objects filled his studios and homes, and his interior figurative scenes frequently included still life images. Perhaps Chase's most famous still life subject was dead fish, which he liked to paint against dark backgrounds, limp on a plate as though fresh from a fishmonger's stall.


A Fishmarket in Venice
Oil on canvas, 1878
49 x 65 inches (124.5 x 165.1 cm)
The Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit


Still Life, Fish, 1912
Brooklyn Museum Of Art, New York, USA
39.45 inch wide x 31.89 inch high
From william-merritt-chase.org


Still Life with Watermelon
Oil on canvas, 1869
27 7/8 x 24 inches (71.1 x 61.0 cm)
Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Still Life (Brass and Glass)
Pastel on paper, 1888
27 x 37 inches (68.6 x 94.0 cm)
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. George J. Arden
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


The Big Brass Bowl
Oil on canvas, c.1898
Public collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center



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