Friday, July 3, 2009

HEADED FOR STARDOM



Headed for stardom
Practice at Muirfield Village
Photo by Jules Alexander
© 1995-2009 PGA TOUR, Inc.


Beautiful swing
Laces on a shoe fly (actually fly off the left)
Photo by Jules Alexander
© 1995-2009 PGA TOUR, Inc.



Full Name: Eldrick "Tiger" Woods
Residence: Orlando, Fla.
Wife: Elin Nordegren (10/5/2004)
Children: Sam Alexis (6/18/2007)
Charlie Axel (2/8/2009)
Parents: Earl and Kultida Woods
Born: December 30, 1975 (Cypress, Calif.)
High School: Western H.S. (Anaheim, Calif.)
College: Stanford University
Height: 6'1"
Weight: 185
1991 (1) U.S. Junior Amateur Championship
1992 (1) U.S. Junior Amateur Championship
1993 (1) U.S. Junior Amateur Championship
1994 (3) U.S. Amateur Championship, Western Amateur, Pacific Northwest Amateur
1995 (1) U.S. Amateur Championship
1996 (4) U.S. Amateur Championship, NCAA Division I Championship, NCAA West Regional, Pac-10 Championship
Turned Pro: 1996


1993 Junior World Championship
Torrey Pines, San Diego California
©2006 Historic Golf Photos


Eldrick (Tiger) Woods, now 33 years of age, has had an unprecedented career since becoming a professional golfer in the late summer of 1996. He has won 88 tournaments, 66 of those on the PGA TOUR, including the 1997, 2001, 2002 and 2005 Masters Tournaments, 1999, 2000, 2006 and 2007 PGA Championships, 2000, 2002, and 2008 U.S. Open Championships, and 2000, 2005 and 2006 British Open Championships. With his second Masters victory in 2001, Tiger became the first ever to hold all four professional major championships at the same time. He is the career victories leader among active players on the PGA TOUR, and is the career money list leader.
Woods won 11 tournaments in 2000, nine on the PGA TOUR, one on the PGA European Tour and the PGA Grand Slam. In addition, Woods and David Duval won the World Cup team title for the United States. He earned $9,188,321 on the PGA TOUR ($11,034,530 worldwide) and broke the PGA TOUR record of $6,616,585 which he set in 1999.
Tiger increased his record total on the PGA TOUR career money list to $76,579,376 through 2007, and had won $94,038,162 worldwide.
His nine PGA TOUR victories in 2000 equaled the fifth highest total ever and were the most since Sam Snead won 11 in 1950. He had eight PGA TOUR victories in 1999, and 11 victories worldwide while winning $7,681,625.
In 2000, Woods matched the record of Ben Hogan in 1953 in winning three professional major championships in the same year. Hogan won the Masters, U.S. Open and British Open. Tiger also became the first since Denny Shute in 1936-37 to win the PGA Championship in consecutive years.
In winning the British Open, Woods became the youngest to complete the career Grand Slam of professional major championships and only the fifth ever to do so, following Hogan, Gene Sarazen, Gary Player and Jack Nicklaus. Tiger also was the youngest Masters champion ever, at the age of 21 years, three months and 14 days, and was the first major championship winner of African or Asian heritage.
The U.S. Open and Masters victories came by record margins, 15 strokes and 12 strokes respectively, and the U.S. Open triumph swept aside the 13-stroke major championship standard which had stood for 138 years, established by Old Tom Morris in the 1862 British Open. The record margin for the U.S. Open had been 11 strokes by Willie Smith in 1899. In the Masters, Woods broke the record margin of nine strokes set by Nicklaus in 1965. Tiger won the British Open by eight strokes, the largest margin since J. H. Taylor in 1913.


Tiger Woods, 19, at his first Masters in 1995
Qualified by winning the 1994 U.S. Amateur championship
Credit: Bob Martin/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


CHRONOLOGY

AGE 20 (1996)
Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year
• PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year
• Won - Disney World/Oldsmobile Classic
• Won - Las Vegas Invitational
• Won - U.S. Amateur Championship, Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club, Cornelius, Ore. (only golfer ever to win three consecutive titles, record 18 consecutive match-play victories).


Woods won his 3rd consecutive U.S. Amateur title, 1996
one more victory in the event than his childhood hero, Jack Nicklaus
Credit: Robert Beck/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won - NCAA Championship, The Honors Course, Chattanooga, Tenn., with scores of 69-67-69-80-285
• Won - John A. Burns Invitational
• Won - Cleveland Golf Championship
• Won - Tri-Match (Stanford, Arizona, Arizona State)
• Won - Cougar Classic
• Won - Pac-10 Championship (shot course-record 61)
• Won - NCAA West Regional
• Missed cut - Masters Tournament with scores of 75-75-150
• Fred Haskins College Player of the Year
• Jack Nicklaus College Player of the Year
• Pac-10 Player of the Year
• First-team All-American
• Al Masters Award co-winner (presented to the outstanding athlete at Stanford for attaining the highest standards of athletic performance, leadership and academic achievement)
• Finished tied for 82nd in U.S. Open with scores of 76-69-77-72-294 and had lead through 13 holes of first round at Oakland Hills
• Tied British Open 72-hole record for an amateur with total of 281 (75-66-70-70) at Royal Lytham & St. Annes, England, matching Iain Pyman at Royal St. George's in 1993.
His second-round five-under 66 was the lowest by an amateur since Frank Stranahan registered the same score at Royal Troon in 1950
• Earned $940,420 worldwide in 11 tournaments as a professional, an average of $85,493 per event. Earned $790,594 on the PGA TOUR in eight events as a professional, finishing 25th on the money list. Earnings were the second-most for a rookie in PGA TOUR history behind David Duval ($881,436 in 26 events in 1995)
• Became the first player to win twice in his first year on the PGA TOUR since Robert Gamez won the 1990 Northern Telecom Tucson Open and Nestle Invitational. Became the first player to record five consecutive top-five finishes on the PGA TOUR since Curtis Strange in 1982
• Advanced to No. 33 on the world ranking, the fastest rise into the top 50 in history

AGE 21 (1997)
• The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year
• ESPY Male Athlete of the Year (Tied with Ken Griffey Jr.)
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $2,066,833 (most ever won in a single year)
• Won $2,440,831 worldwide in 25 events.
• Won - Masters Tournament (first professional major championship)


Woods won the 1997 Masters
his first major
(a remarkable 12 shots over his closest competitor)
Credit: John Iacono/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


For the RECORD:
Tiger re-wrote the record books at Augusta
New Low 72-hole score: 270
Most shots under par, back nine: -16
Low middle 36 holes: 131
Low first 54 holes: 201(tied record- Ray Flayed, 1976)
Low last 54 holes: 200
Lowest score par 5's,one round: -6 (tied record- Steve Jones 1990)
Largest 54 hole lead: 9
Youngest Champion: 21 years, 3 months, 14 days old
Youngest 36 hole leader
Largest margin of Victory: 12
Most 3's, one tournament: 26 (tied Larry Nelson, 1984)


After winning that first Masters
Tiger embraced his father, Earl
The elder Woods started teaching his son the game
in the family's garage in Cypress, Calif.
when Tiger was only 2
Credit: Heinz Kluetmeier/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won - Mercedes Championships
• Won - Asian Honda Classic (Thailand)
• Won - GTE Byron Nelson Classic
• Won - Motorola Western Open
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches
• Set Masters record for youngest champion (21 years, three months, 14 days) and became the first major champion of African or Asian heritage
• Set Masters 72-hole record with a total of 270 (70-66-65-69) and set Masters record with 12-stroke victory margin
• Other Masters records set or tied: most shots under par, second nine (16), low middle 36 holes (131), low first 54 holes (201), tied Raymond Floyd, 1976), low last 54 holes (200),
lowest score par-five holes in one round (six under par, tied Steve Jones, 1990), largest 54-hole lead (nine strokes), youngest 36-hole and 54-hole leader, most threes, one tournament (26)
• Shot 59, 13 under par in practice round on April 4 at home course, Isleworth Country Club, Windermere, Fla., with two eagles, nine birdies and two pars on par-five holes
• Set record with five PGA TOUR victories in his first 16 events. He was the second-youngest (21 years, four months, 20 days) to win five events, behind Horton Smith (20 years, 10 months, one day) in 1929
• Achieved $2 million in PGA TOUR career earnings in a record 16 events (previous record was 50 events by Ernie Els in 1990-96)
• Achieved No. 1 world ranking in his 42nd week as a professional and became the youngest-ever No. 1 golfer (21 years, 24 weeks), ahead of Bernhard Langer (29 years,
31 weeks) in 1986. He also made the fastest rise from amateur status to the top 100
(six weeks), top 50 (eight weeks) and top 10 (33 weeks)
• In first year as a professional, ending with NEC World Series of Golf, won $2,740,514 on the PGA TOUR ($2,946,163 worldwide) with six victories and 14 top-10 finishes in 25 events (seven victories and 19 top-10 finshes in 30 events worldwide)


1997 (a year after he earned his PGA Tour card)
Woods electrified the rowdy Phoenix Open crowd
a hole-in-one at the 16th hole at TPC Scottsdale
Credit: Robert Beck/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


AGE 22 (1998)
• Won $2,927,006 worldwide in 26 events to surpass 1997 earnings of $2,440,832
• Had 13 top-10 finishes in 20 starts on PGA TOUR, including second in Mercedes
Championships and Nissan Open, and official earnings of $1,841,117 for fourth place
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 1998 Official World
Golf Ranking
• Won - Johnnie Walker Classic (Thailand)
• Won - BellSouth Classic
• Won - PGA Grand Slam
• Qualified for United States team for Presidents Cup
• Achieved eight-stroke comeback, winning Johnnie Walker Classic after starting fourth round tied for 18th place, then scoring 65 and beating Ernie Els with birdie on second playoff hole
• Reached final of Cisco World Match Play Championship before losing 1-up to Mark
O' Meara despite being 12 under par for 36 holes (record score for losing finalist)
• Won PGA Grand Slam, defeating Lee Janzen and Vijay Singh in match play
• Finished second in Nedbank Million Dollar Challenge after five-hole playoff with Nick Price
• Had current PGA TOUR record for most consecutive events without missing the cut (17). Has missed only one cut (1997 Bell Canadian Open) in 48 events since joining PGA TOUR 1996. Current record of 17 events is based on withdrawal from storm-delayed AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am
• In two years as a professional, ending with NEC World Series of Golf, won $4,561,494 on PGA TOUR ($5,300,204 worldwide) with seven victories and 26 top-10 finishes in 47 events (nine victories and 30 top-10 finishes in 55 events worldwide)

AGE 23 (1999)
• World Sportsman of the Year as chosen by the founding members of the World Sports Academy in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards
• The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year for the second time in three years and the seventh man -- and the second golfer -- to earn the award twice since it was begun in 1931, following Byron Nelson, Don Budge, Sandy Koufax, Carl Lewis, Joe Montana and Michael Jordan, who won three times
• ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the second time in three years and ESPY Golfer of the Decade
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR ( Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America
and Golf Writers Association of America
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.43) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $6,616,585 (most ever won in a single year). Had margin of $2,974,679 over runner-up, a figure greater than the previous single-year record. Had 81.7 percent more than David Duval, the highest percentage since Byron Nelson in 1945 (87.2 percent) and Ben Hogan in 1946 (85 percent)
• Won $7,681,625 worldwide in 25 events (100.02 percent more than runner-up)
• Had 16 top-10 finishes in 21 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no 36-hole cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to 39 consecutive events
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 1999 Official World Golf Ranking. Achieved the highest points average (20.61) in the history of the Ranking and had the largest margin ever over his closest rival (7.46 points), leading David Duval by that amount on Nov. 7. His 750 points earned in 1999 were also a record
• Won - Buick Invitational
• Won - Deutsche Bank - SAP Open (Germany)
• Won - Memorial Tournament
• Won - Motorola Western Open
• Won - PGA Championship (fifth youngest to win at age 23 years, seven months, 16 days)


Woods won his second major
The 1999 PGA Championship at Medinah Country Club
by holding off Sergio Garcia
Credit: Robert Beck/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won - WGC NEC Invitational
• Won - National Car Rental Classic
• Won - Tour Championship
• Won - WGC American Express Championship
• Won - World Cup individual and team titles (with Mark O'Meara)
• Won - PGA Grand Slam
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches
• Set records for most victories by age 23 and after three years on the PGA TOUR with 15 PGA TOUR victories and 21 overall. Horton Smith had 10 victories after three years in 1929 and 15 victories in 1931 at age 23
• His eight PGA TOUR victories and 11 overall were the most in one year at such a young age since Horton Smith had eight PGA TOUR victories in 1929 at age 21
• Was the first to have as many as eight PGA TOUR victories in one year since Johnny Miller won eight in 1974
• Won four consecutive PGA TOUR events, the first to do that since Ben Hogan in 1953
• In three years as a professional, ending with WGC NEC Invitational, won $8,965,129 on PGA TOUR ($10,895,083 worldwide) with 12 victories and 40 top-10 finishes in 67 events (16 victories and 45 top-10 finishes in 81 events worldwide)
• Participated in the first network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, defeating David Duval, 2 and 1, in the Motorola Showdown at Sherwood, at Sherwood Country Club in Thousand Oaks, Calif., to win $1.1 million (including $200,000 to charity)

AGE 24 (2000)
• Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year, the first person to win the award more than once
• The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year. He, Lance Armstrong and Michael Jordan are the only athletes to win the award three times
• ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the third time in four years and winner of four ESPY awards for a record total of 11 career ESPY awards.
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• The Sporting News Most Powerful Person in Sports
• L'Equipe (France) World Champion of Champions
• Reuters Sportsman of the Year
• World Sportsman of the Year as chosen by the founding members of the World Sports Academy in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards
• Lowest actual scoring average (68.17), breaking Byron Nelson's record (68.33) in 1945
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (67.79) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America) and breaking the record (68.43) which Woods set in 1999
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $9,188,321 (most ever won in a single year). Had margin of $4,441,864 over runner-up Phil Mickelson (93.6 percent more than Mickelson)
• Won $11,034,530 worldwide in 25 events (82 percent more than runner-up)
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $20,503,450 ($25,024,412 worldwide)
• Had 17 top-10 finishes in 20 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to 59 consecutive events
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2000 Official World Golf Ranking. Achieved the highest points average (29.40) in the history of the Ranking and had the largest margin ever over his closest rival, leading Ernie Els by 17.75 points. His 948.22 points earned in 2000 were also a record.
• Won - Mercedes Championships
• Won - AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am
• Won - Bay Hill Invitational
• Won - Memorial Tournament
• Won - U.S. Open Championship


The 2000 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach
Woods won by the largest margin ever in a major (15 strokes)
Credit: John Biever/SI
2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won - British Open Championship


2000 British Open
Not only would Tiger win at St. Andrews
he also broke his own record
for best overall performance in a major (19-under)
One of three British Open champions
to shoot all four rounds in the 60s
Text: Andy Gray/SI.com
Photo: Robert Beck/SI


The 2000 British Open
Woods brought the Old Course at St. Andrews to its knees
winning by eight shots over Ernie Els and Thomas Bjorn
Credit: Bob Martin/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.



The Claret Jug 2000 British Open
Tiger becomes the youngest player to win all four majors
The first player since Tom Watson in 1982
to win the U.S. and British Open in the same year
Text: Andy Gray/SI.com
Photo: Robert Beck/S


• Won - PGA Championship
• Won - WGC NEC Invitational
• Won - Bell Canadian Open
• Won - Johnnie Walker Classic
• Won - PGA Grand Slam


2000 PGA Championship
Fans and media watch intently
Woods hits his second shot on the third playoff hole
(Jack Nicklaus personally designed the course)
The most compelling endings in PGA Championship history
Text: Andy Gray/SI.com
Photo: John Biever/SI


PGA Championship title in 2000
Woods was pushed to the limit by Bob May
Won a three-hole playoff
Valhalla Country Club in Louisville, Ky.
Credit: Robert Beck/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won - World Cup (with David Duval)
• Qualified for United States team for Presidents Cup
• Was the first to have as many as nine PGA TOUR victories in one year since Sam Snead won 11 in 1950
• Extended his PGA TOUR record streak of consecutive rounds of par or better to 47 (Since second round of GTE Byron Nelson Classic, 61 rounds worldwide)
• Became the first to be under par in every event played on the PGA TOUR for an entire year
• Rallied for fifth and sixth consecutive victories, the longest PGA TOUR winning streak since Ben Hogan's six in a row in 1948. Played last three holes in 4-under par at
Mercedes Championships, then defeated Ernie Els in playoff with 40-foot birdie putt. Trailed Matt Gogel by seven strokes with seven holes to play in final round at AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, then played the last four holes in 4-under par to win by two strokes
• Became PGA TOUR's career-leading money-winner after AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am with over $12.8 million
• Became career victories leader (20) among active players on PGA TOUR by winning the U.S. Open


Tiger Woods holding up his US Open Trophy
Pebble Beach
June 18, 2000
©2006 Historic Golf Photos


• Became the first ever to have won the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur and U.S. Junior Amateur titles.
• Tied U.S. Open record with 272 total (65-69-71-67), equaling the totals of Jack Nicklaus in 1980 and Lee Janzen in 1993
• Set U.S. Open record for margin of victory (15 strokes), surpassing the 11-stroke margin by Willie Smith in 1899. Also set major championship record, surpassing the 13-stroke margin by Old Tom Morris in 1862 British Open
• Set U.S. Open records for largest leads after 36 holes (six strokes) and 54 holes (10 strokes). Also tied Henry Cotton in 1934 British Open for largest lead in a major championship after 54 holes
• Set U.S. Open record for lowest score in relation to par, 12 under par
• Became the fifth player to lead U.S. Open from start to finish without being tied at end
of any round. Had lowest score in three of the four rounds
• With British Open victory, became the fifth ever and the youngest to complete the career Grand Slam of professional major championships, following Jack Nicklaus (age 26) Gary Player (29), Gene Sarazen (33) and Ben Hogan (40)


Tiger Woods holding up the claret jug
2000 British Open Champion
©2006 Historic Golf Photos


• Became the sixth to win the U.S. Open and British Open in the same year, following Bobby Jones (1926, '30), Gene Sarazen (1932), Ben Hogan (1953), Lee Trevino (1971) and Tom Watson (1982)
• Set British Open and major championship records for the lowest score in relation to par, 19 under par, 269
• With PGA Championship victory, became the first since Ben Hogan in 1953 to win
three major championships in the same year. Hogan won the Masters, U.S. Open and
British Open
• Became the first since Denny Shute in 1936-37 to win the PGA Championship in
consecutive years
• Became the first to win the U.S. Open, British Open and PGA Championship in the sameyear
• Set PGA Championship record for the lowest score in relation to par, 18 under par, 270 (Shared with Bob May, who lost in three-hole playoff)
• In four years as a professional, ending with WGC NEC Invitational, won $19,007,950 on PGA TOUR ($21,938,114 worldwide) with 23 victories and 56 top-10 finishes in 86 events (29 victories and 74 top-10 finishes in 105 events worldwide)
• Set PGA TOUR record for lowest score after 36 holes (125 on rounds of 64 and 61) in WGC NEC Invitational
• Became the second, along with Lee Trevino in 1971, to win the U.S. Open, British Open and Canadian Open in the same year
• Participated in the second network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, losing to Sergio Garcia, 1 up, in the Lincoln Financial Group Battle at Bighorn, at Bighorn Golf Club in Palm Desert, Calif., to earn $400,000 (including $200,000 to charity)

AGE 25 (2001)
• ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the third consecutive year, for the fourth time in five years and winner of three ESPY Awards for a record total of 14 career ESPY Awards
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• First player to win Jack Nicklaus Award (presented since 1990) for three consecutive years and four years total
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.81) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America).
• Second player (other was Greg Norman 1993-95) to win Byron Nelson Award (presented since 1980) for three consecutive years
• Third player (others were Lee Trevino, 1970-72, and Tom Watson, 1977-79) to win Vardon Trophy (presented since 1937) for three consecutive years
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $5,687,777
• Fourth player (others were Ben Hogan 1940-42, Jack Nicklaus, 1971-73, and Tom Watson, 1977-80) to be leading money-winner on PGA TOUR for three or more consecutive years
• Won $7,771,562 worldwide in 24 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $26,191,227 ($32,795,974 worldwide)
• Had nine top-10 finishes in 19 starts on PGA TOUR, and no missed cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to 78 consecutive events
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2001 Official World Golf Ranking
• Won - Bay Hill Invitational
• Won - THE PLAYERS Championship
• Won - Masters Tournament


With two of his main rivals in hot pursuit
Tiger Woods won the 2001 Masters
He beat David Duval by two shots and Phil Mickelson by three
Credit: Fred Vuich/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


2001 masters
Is it envy or awe going through Vijay Singh's mind
Woods acknowledge the crowd after his win
The only golfer in history to hold
all four major titles at the same time
Text: Andy Gray/SI.com
Photo: Robert Beck/SI


• Won - Deutsche Bank – SAP Open
• Won - Memorial Tournament
• Won - WGC NEC Invitational
• Won - PGA Grand Slam
• Won - Willams World Challenge
• Tied for first place with amateur partner Jerry Chang in AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. Tied with Phil Mickelson and amateur Kenny G
• With Masters victory, became the first ever to hold all four professional major championships at the same time
• With Memorial victory, became the first to win the same event for three consecutive years since Tom Watson (1978-80 Byron Nelson Classic)
• With WGC NEC Invitational victory, became the fourth to win two events for three or more consecutive years, joining Walter Hagen, Gene Sarazen and Arnold Palmer. Note: Some record-keepers do not include Sarazen
• Set PGA TOUR record with 52 consecutive rounds of par or better (second round of 2000 GTE Byron Nelson Classic through first round of 2001 Phoenix Open, 66 consecutive rounds worldwide)
• Set PGA TOUR record with 35 consecutive events at par or better (stroke-play events only, all under par), from 1999 PGA Championship through 2001 Memorial Tournament
• Set record at Buick Classic with 97th consecutive week as No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking, surpassing Greg Norman, who had 96 consecutive weeks in 1995-97. Finished 2001 with 124 consecutive weeks
• In five years as a professional, ending with WGC NEC Invitational, won $25,989,198 on PGA TOUR ($31,035,613 worldwide) with 29 victories and 69 top-10 finishes in 106 events (38 victories and 92 top-10 finishes in 130 events worldwide)
• Participated in the third network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, teaming with Annika Sorenstam to defeat David Duval and Karrie Webb in playoff in Lincoln Financial Group Battle at Bighorn, at Bighorn Golf Club in Palm Desert, Calif., to earn $1.1 million (split with Sorenstam after $200,000 donated to charity)

AGE 26 (2002)
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• First player to win Jack Nicklaus Award (presented since 1990) for four consecutive years and five years total
• Second player to win PGA of America Award for four consecutive years (other was Tom Watson 1977-80)
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.56) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• First player to win Byron Nelson Award and Vardon Trophy for four consecutive years
• First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year and Vardon Trophy in the same year for four consecutive years
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $6,912,625
• Second player to be leading money-winner on PGA TOUR for four consecutive years (other was Tom Watson 1977-80)
• Won $8,417,188 worldwide in 24 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $33,103,852
• Had 13 top-10 finishes in 18 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to 96 consecutive events
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2002 Official World Golf Ranking
• Finished 2002 with 176 consecutive weeks as the No. 1 player on the Official World Golf Ranking
• Won - Bay Hill Invitational
• Won - Masters Tournament


In the trees at Augusta National
Woods made all the right moves
His third green jacket in 2002
winning by three shots over Retief Goosen
Credit: Simon Bruty/SI
2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won - Deutsche Bank – SAP Open
• Won - U.S. Open Championship


Woods fires a shot on the 16th hole
Bethpage Black in Farmingdale, N.Y.
Woods captured his eighth major.
Text: Andy Gray/SI.com
Photo: Fred Vuich/SI


The 2000 U.S. Open
Municipal Course Bethpage Black
Woods held off Phil Mickelson to win by three shots
Credit: Bob Martin/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won - Buick Open
• Won - WGC American Express Championship
• Won - PGA Grand Slam
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches
• With Bay Hill victory, became the first to win three different events for three or more consecutive years
• Became the first ever to have won two or more titles each in the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur and U.S. Junior Amateur. (Earlier in 2000, became the first ever to have won all three of those championships)
• Became the first ever to lead the U.S. Open twice (also in 2000) from start to finish without being tied at the end of any round. Four other players had done so once, Walter Hagen (1914), Jim Barnes (1921), Ben Hogan (1953) and Tony Jacklin (1970)
• Became the sixth to win the Masters and U.S. Open in the same year, following Craig Wood (1941), Ben Hogan (1951, '53), Arnold Palmer (1960) and Jack Nicklaus (1972)
• Participated in a network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, teaming with Jack Nicklaus to defeat Lee Trevino and Sergio Garcia, 2 and 1, in Lincoln Financial Group Battle at Bighorn, at Bighorn Golf Club in Palm Desert, California, to earn $1.2 million (split with Nicklaus after $200,000 donated to charity)


Elin watched the 2002 British Open
with Tiger's mother, Kultida Woods
Credit: Adam Butler/AP
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


AGE 27 (2003)
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America. First player to win awards for five consecutive years.
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.41) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• First player to win Byron Nelson Award and Vardon Trophy for five consecutive years
• First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year and Vardon Trophy in the same year for five consecutive years
• Won $6,673,413 on PGA TOUR
• Won $7,400,288 worldwide in 20 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $39,777,265
• Had 12 top-10 finishes in 18 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to a record 114 consecutive events, breaking the record of 113 consecutive events set by Byron Nelson in the 1940s
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2003 Official World Golf Ranking
• Finished 2003 with 299 total weeks as the No. 1 player on the Official World Golf Ranking (record is 331 weeks by Greg Norman)
• Finished 2003 with a record 229 consecutive weeks as the No. 1 player on the Official World Golf Ranking (Since Aug. 15, 1999)
• Won - Buick Invitational
• Won - WGC Accenture Match Play
• Won - Bay Hill Invitational
• Won - Western Open
• Won - WGC American Express Championship
• Qualified for United States team for Presidents Cup
• With Bay Hill victory, tied PGA TOUR record for the most consecutive victories in a single event with four consecutive victories
• First player to win at least five events on PGA TOUR every year for five consecutive years
• Participated in a network telecast of a golf event live in prime time for the fifth year, teaming with Ernie Els to lose to Sergio Garcia and Phil Michelson, 3 and 1, in Lincoln Financial Group Battle at the Bridges in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., to earn $500,000 (split with Els after $100,000 donated to charity)

Woods practicing before 2004 Ryder Cup
Oakland Hills Country Club
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

AGE 28 (2004)• Won - WGC Accenture Match Play
• Won - Dunlop Phoenix
• Won - Target World Challenge
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches
• Won $5,365,472 on PGA TOUR
• Won $7,379,407 worldwide in 23 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $45,142,737
• Had 14 Top-10 finishes in 19 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to a record 133 consecutive events (Previous record was 113 events by Byron Nelson in the 1940s)
• Set record with 264 consecutive weeks as No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking, from the list of Aug. 15, 1999, through the list of Aug. 29, 2004 (Previous record was 96 consecutive weeks by Greg Norman in 1995-1997)
• Set record with 334 total weeks as No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking, through the list of Aug. 29, 2004 (Previous record was 331 weeks by Greg Norman)
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2004 Official World Golf Ranking
• Participated in a network telecast of a golf event live in prime time for the sixth year, teaming with Hank Kuehne to defeat Phil Mickelson and John Daly, 2 and 1, in Lincoln Financial Group Battle of the Bridges at Rancho Santa Fe in Rancho Santa Fe, California, to earn $500,000 (Split with Kuehne after $100,000 donated to charity)

AGE 29 (2005)
• Player of the Year as selected by the PGA (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.66) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year for seven years ( Tom Watson won six, Jack Nicklaus, five, and Ben Hogan, four) and Vardon Trophy for six years (Billy Casper and Lee Trevino won five each)
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR ( Arnold Palmer Award) with $10,628,024
• Won $12,158,439 worldwide in 26 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $55,770,760


Sinking a 15-foot birdie putt
Tiger Woods won his fourth Masters title 2005
First playoff hole against Chris DiMarco
Credit: Al Tielemans/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


The 2005 Masters
Tiger and Elin celebrate his fourth green jacket
Credit: John Biever/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


The 2005British Open St. Andrews
Woods was in top form
He won the Claret Jug for a 2nd time
(5 shot margin of victory over second-place Colin Montgomerie)
Credit: Robert Beck/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


AGE 30 (2006)
• Won Buick Invitational
• Won Dubai Desert Classic
• Won Ford Championship
• Won British Open Championship


Elin and Tiger
Tiger won the 2006 British Open at Hoylake
first major victory following the death of his father, Earl
Credit: Wireimage.com
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won Buick Open
• Won PGA Championship


Medinah in 2006
The site of his first PGA Championship win
Tiger Woods was victorious again
He cruised to his 12th major title
Credit: John Biever/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won WGC Bridgestone
• Won Deutsche Bank Championship
• Won WGC American Express
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $9,941,563
• Won $13,025,558 worldwide in 17 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $65,712,324
• Had 11 top-10 finishes in 15 starts on PGA TOUR
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2006 Official World Golf Ranking
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches

AGE 31 (2007)
• Won Buick Invitational
• Won WGC CA Championship
• Won Wachovia Championship
• Won WGC Bridgestone
• Won PGA Championship


The 2007 PGA Championship
Tiger Woods won his 13th major
Southern Hills in Tulsa
Credit: John Biever/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won BMW Championship
• Won Tour Championship
• Won Target World Challenge
• As founder of the Tiger Woods Foundation, honored by Golf Writers Association of America "for unselfish contributions to the betterment of society"
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $10,867,052
• Won $12,352,706 worldwide in 17 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $76,579,376
• Had 12 top-10 finishes in 15 starts on PGA TOUR
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (67-79), equaling record which Woods set in 2000 for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2007 Official World Golf Ranking
• Qualified for United States team for Presidents Cup

AGE 32 (2008)
• Won Buick Invitational
• Won Dubai Desert Classic
• Won WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship
• Won Arnold Palmer Invitational
• Won U.S. Open Championship


The 2008 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines
Woods won his 14th major
The most dramatic performance of his career
Playing on an injured knee
he defeated Rocco Mediate in a playoff
Credit: Fred Vuich/SI
© 2009SirenServ, Inc.


• Won four of six PGA TOUR starts, including the U.S. Open, before season-ending knee surgery in June
• Won fourth consecutive Buick Invitational at Torrey Pines
• Second time he has won an event four years in a row, also winning the Arnold Palmer Invitational from 2000-03
• Won at Bay Hill for the fifth time in his career, becoming the first player in PGA TOUR history to win four tournaments at least five times
• Tied Arnold Palmer (62 victories) with his first win of the year, and ended his season one ahead of Ben Hogan (65-64) for third place all-time
• Captured five consecutive TOUR events over two seasons
• In his first start two months after surgery, parred the first hole of sudden death (91 holes) to defeat Rocco Mediate and win the U.S. Open. Sank a 12-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole to force an 18-hole playoff
• U.S. Open win made him 14-14 in majors when holding the third-round lead
• June 16 Official World Golf Ranking marked his 500th week atop the Ranking
• Unable to compete due to injury for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches

AGE 33 (2009)
• Won Arnold Palmer Invitational
• Win at Arnold Palmer was his sixth victory in the event. He has won six times each in three other tournaments.
• At AP, rallied from five shots back the final day to tie his best PGA Tour comeback mark (2000 AT&T Pebble Beach)
• Sank winning birdie on the final hole for the second consecutive year at Bay Hill, the third time overall
• Returned to the winner's circle after 286 days
• Was 10-under-par after 70 holes at the Masters before finishing T6
• Won Memorial Tournament
• Win at the Memorial Tournament was his fourth victory in the event
• At Memorial, rallied from four shots back the final day. Final round included birdies on the last two holes for a one-stroke victory
• Was 14 of 14 in fairways hit Sunday at Memorial and 49 of 56 during the week, equaling the best mark of his professional career (1998 Masters)
(© 2009 TigerWoods.com)


Woods meets with US President Barack Obama
The White House
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Las Vegas, Nevada - 16.05.09
From Contactmusic.com


By H-TownBaller4Life on Photobucket


© 2009SirenServ, Inc.



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