Monday, August 10, 2009

LEADING PAINTER OF VENETIAN GENRE


It was in Venice that Eugene de Blaas established himself as the leading painter of Venetian genre. Venice had been an essential stop on the Grand Tour since the early eighteenth century, past visitors had returned home with views and portraits, the late nineteenth century visitor wanted more. The affluent Venetian visitor wanted human interest, a sense of life by the canals and campos of the city, as a result of which a school of artists developed to supply this market. Native Italian artists like Antonio Paoletti and Antonio Rotta, Luke Fildes and William Logsdail from England, but above all Eugene de Blaas, depicted the life of Venetian fisherfolk, gondoliers and Venetian beauties. The titles of his paintings; "The Love Letter", "Stolen Kiss", "The Suitor", with his highly polished technique, the depiction of embroidered lace, auburn hair and a coquettish glance, ensured that his paintings were of universal appeal.
Between 1875 and 1891 de Blaas exhibited twelve works at the Royal Academy, London. By 1885 the art dealer Arthur Tooth & Son in London represented him before moving to his rival T. Maclean from 1886, also in London, an indication of the artist's popularity in Britain.
His works can be found in museums in Leicester; Melbourne; Nottingham; Sheffield; Sydney, Art Gallery of New South Wales and Vienna.
(From fineoldart.com)


The Love Letter
Oil on canvas, 1902
31 3/8 x 17 1/2 inches (80 x 44.5 cm)
Private collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


The Suitor
Image from allpaintings.org


He was a painter of genre scenes, born of Austrian parents on 24th July 1843 in Albano, near Rome. He spent much time painting monumental works of Venetian fishing families. These works are of fine quality and in them can be seen de Blaas’ mastery of portraiture for which he is particularly famous. He visited Belgium and France and lived in England for a time. From 1875 until 1892 he exhibited at the Royal Academy in London, the Grafton Gallery and the New Gallery in London. Eugene de Blaas is an artist of great importance in 19th century figure painting. The quality of his work is outstanding and he is represented in many fine private collections.
(From allpaintings.org)
In locustsandhoney.blogspot.com, John wrote, " What I like about Blaas is that his models are posed, but appear in motion, as though we are eavesdropping on a slice of everyday life. Looking at a Blaas compels me to take a sigh of relief. People are happy and all is well with the world."


Flirtation at the well
Image from Galeria Nueve at Images.google.com


Flirtation at the Well
Oil on panel, 1902
35 7/8 x 47 7/8 inches
Private collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


The Flirtation
Oil on panel, 1904
32 7/8 x 39 1/2 inches
Private collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Catch of the Day
Oil on canvas
39 x 50 7/8 inches
Public collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


The Serenade
Oil on canvas, 1910
37 x 44 inches
Private collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


A Helping Hand
Oil on canvas, 1884
35 5/8 x 26 inches
Private collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


On The Balcony
Oil on canvas
41 7/8 x 25 3/4 inches
Private collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


Eugene von Blaas painted numerous subjects but notably he favoured and excelled in images of female beauty. Blaas painted in both oil and watercolour using both mediums with consummate ease. His models are always beautiful with exquisite facial line and skin tone. Their poses are enduring, drawing the viewer with a bashful turn or a defenceless expression. Blaas deliberately sets out to catch the viewer's weaker instinct and rarely he fails.
(Google Home)


Portrait de femme, 1900
Source artrenewal.org
From Wikimedia Commons


Jeune beauté italienne.
Date avant 1932
Source museumsyndicate.com
From Wikimedia Commons


A Young Beauty
Oil on panel
10 5/8 x 8 1/4 inches
Private collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


On the Beach
Oil on canvas
29 x 17 inches
Private collection
This image is courtesy of the Art Renewal Center


The Flower Girl, 1911
Painting - oil on canvas
Height: 121 in Width 70.8 in
Private collection
Image from Museuma.com


Eugene von Blaas captured the everyday lives of humble Venetians amid the ancient masonry of intimate courtyards and unassuming back streets. As Thomas Wassibauer describes in his catalogue raisonne, ‘He contrasted the decaying grandeur of old Venetian stone with…young people…his young people live their lives within the old walls of a still-important city, and become links in an apparently endless chain of generations who carry on the Venetian traditions and the way of life’
His father, Karl von Blaas (1815-1894), was a leading history, portrait and fresco painter of Roman society of the late Biedermeier period, and Eugene received his artistic training from him. Karl von Blaas had studied at the Academies of Rome and Venice at the time when both cities were within the Austrian Empire. He became a professor at the Academy of Venice, and his son Eugene assumed the position later in his life. Karl had another son Julius who was also a painter, he specialised in animal and military scenes.
Eugene von Blaas had an international exhibiting career. He was a regular contributor to the Esposizione Nationale exhibitions in Venice and the Jubilaums Austellungs held in Vienna and Munich. He also showed his paintings at the Royal Academy, the Grafton Gallery and the New Gallery in London between 1875 and 1892. Images of Italian peasant life had been made popular in the 1800’s by Louis LĂ©opold Robert (1794-1835) and Charles Eastlake (1793-1865). These picturesque visions of traditional rural life appealed to a generation of collectors who came of age during the troubled moment of the Industrial Revolution.
The combination of the great Classical sites, the picturesque costumes and customs ascribed to the Italian peasantry and the golden delights of the Italian climate had lured hundreds of English and French visitors to Italy on Grand Tours since the 18th century.
(From richard-green.com)


4 comments:

abigdreamer said...

I collect paintings by this artist.

rompedas said...

Thanks to abigdreamer for the information.

gabridis said...

I just discovered this artist and I'd like to ask if he signed all his works ?
Many thanks
gabriel

rompedas said...

Thanks to gabridis for the comment. I am sorry for the late reply. I've not been attending to my blog for such a long time. May be BLAAS, Eugen Alfons Von
(1843-1931), Austria did not sign all of his works.