Thursday, February 18, 2010

SKAGEN PAINTER




Autorretrato
Self portrait
Oil on canvas, 1879
Public collection
From ARC


Autorretrato del pintor
Oil on canvas
Public collection
From ARC


A group of artists congregated to form the "Skagen painters" in Skagen, a small fishing village in the north of Denmark, situated on both North and Baltic Sea, at the end of the 19th century. Following the model of the School of Barbizon, the artists wanted to make pleinair paintings and capture nature in a realistic manner in their paintings. The "Skagen painters" found the subjects of their paintings in the surroundings of the small village, which proved to be quite suitable for pleinair painting, as Skagen is situated where Baltic and North Sea converge, thus the "Skagen painters" often depicted the breaking waves and the water's light reflections. Additionally, they observed the people doing their work or watched the children playing on the beach. The "Skagen painters" were especially fascinated by the northern lights, their depiction making for the painting's special appeal. However, the "Skagen painters" did not only depict outside scenes in their paintings, they also used the light and its effects for interior scenes.
Just as later in Impressionism, to which their art was already on the brink, the "Skagen painters" used colors to paint shadows; additionally, they employed complementary contrasts in order to intensify the coloring's luminance.
The "Skagen painters" regularly met in the hotel of the father of the painter Anna Ancher, in order to exchange ideas. This was where the "Skagens Museum" was found in 1908, its collection comprising some 1700 works. Among the most prominent "Skagen painters" were Michael Ancher (1849-1927) and the group's only local member, his wife Anna Ancher (1859-1935), also Holger Drachmann, Viggo Johansen, , Christian Krohg, Carl Locher, Karl Madsen and Lauritz Tuxen, Peder Severin Krøyer (P.S. Krøyer) and his wife Marie Krøyer.
(KETTERER KUNST)


Michael Ancher
Oil on canvas, 1886
Public collection
From ARC



Anna Ancher
Oil on canvas, 1886 (?)
Public collection
From ARC


Danish artist, Peter Severin Kroyer was actually born in Stravenger, in Norway, in 1851 and he became the most famous of the Danish ‘painters of light’ of the nineteenth century. A very versatile artist, Kroyer’s work depicted a wide range of themes, including seascapes, portraits, landscapes and genre scenes although he also practiced sculpture, engraving and watercolor.
A student at the Academy of Copenhagen, he traveled frequently, and particularly to Paris, where he became a pupil of the eminent teacher, Bonnat, and where he was inspired by the work of the Impressionists to emphasize the use of light more in his paintings. Kroyer was awarded many prestigious prizes throughout his career and he became a Chevalier de la Legion d’Honneur in 1888. Many of his greatest paintings are held by the Museum of Copenhagen.
(Canvas Replicas)


The Hirschsprung Family
From Articles & Texticles

From Articles & Texticles
Heinrich Hirschsprung (above) was not only a patron of the arts who supported Krøyer during the formative years of his career, but also later introduced Krøyer to his future wife, Marie. He also founded a museum. Although Peter Severin Kroyer is one of Denmark’s favourite painters, he was actually born in Norway. Soon after his birth in July 1851, he was adopted by his mother’s sister and her husband, and taken to live in Copenhagen, Denmark. He started his art education at nine years old. In 1870 at the age of 19 he finishes his studies at the Royal Danish Academy of Art. In 1874 Heinrich Hirschsprung bought his first painting from Krøyer, establishing an enduring patronage. 1877-1881, Krøyer travelled throughout Europe, developing his skills and vision. He stayed in Paris and studied under Leon Bonnat. He was certainly influenced by the major impressionists of that time: Sisley, Renoir, Degas, Monet and Manet. Hirschsprung provided financial backing for Krøyer during this time of travel and learning. In 1882 Krøyer arrived in Skagen, Denmark (pronounced SKAIN)
(Articles & Texticles)


From Articles & Texticles


Skagen Aerial View
From Articles & Texticles


Skagen Beach
From Articles & Texticles


Exhausted Fishermen
From Articles & Texticles


Día de verano en Skagen
Oil on canvas, 1884
Public collection
From ARC


Hip hip hooray! Artists celebrating at Skagen, 1888
Original painting owned by Göteborgs Konstmuseum
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Hip, hip hooray!(detail)
Oil on canvas, 1888
Public collection
From ARC


Peder Severin Krøyer bought his first camera in 1885 and it came to play an important part in his work as artist. The origin of Hip, hip hooray! (above) was a photograph taken the same year in the garden of a married artist couple named Ancher, at Skagen, Denmark. The photograph is no simple snapshot but a careful arranging of the group in fixed poses. Around the table from the left we see Martha Johansen, followed by Viggo Johansen, Christian Krogh, Krøyer himself, Degn Brøndum, Michael Ancher, Oscar Björck, Thorvald Niss, Helene Christensen and Anna Ancher with her daughter Helga aged four.
Krøyer was delighted with the photograph and the very next day dragged his models and materials to the Ancher garden for the painting. Michael Ancher did not want him painting there, however, so Krøyer moved the table to his own garden. It took several years before the picture was finally ready.
The play of light across the white cloth, glittering glasses, bottles and china - the sunlight piercing the leafy arbour and casting shadows over the people around the table - all is recorded with masterly control. The picture belongs in the category of open-air painting as espoused by the opponents of conventional artistic taste; but it is more than a fresh breath of natural scenery, being also filled with vitality and warmth. It is a celebration of summer, friends, art and Skagen.
(Fürstenberg gallery)


Pintores en la playa
Oil on canvas, 1892
Public collection
From ARC


Pescadores en Skagen
Oil on canvas, 1894
Public collection
From ARC


Baño de muchachos
Boys Bathing on Skagen's Southern beach
Oil on canvas, 1892
Public collection
From ARC


Krøyer painting Boys bathing on Skagen's Southern beach
From Articles & Texticles


In the photograph (above) P.S. Krøyer is seen sitting with his large canvas near the shoreline, painting one of the models for the painting Boys bathing. At the start of the 19th century, several French artists would complete their works in the open. To a certain extent, artists have always been working in the open, but before the 19th century it had been common practice for artists to complete their works at their studios. During the 19th century, however, open-air painting became an artistic practice in its own right, and in the 1870's, the French impressionists became known for their quick, spontaneous sketches of Nature. When the Skagen Painters started coming to Skagen, it had become fashionable to complete one's paintings in front of the motifs, even the large canvasses. It was called open-air painting, because the artists sat out in the open whilst painting. In this way, they were able to capture the light and the colours directly on the canvas. It was thanks to the open-air painting, the unique landscape, the special environment, the colourful locals – and the fact that other artists were staying in Skagen – that an artists' colony emerged in Skagen towards the end of the 1870's.
(Skagens Museum)


Playa de Skagen
Oil on canvas, 1892
Public collection
From ARC


Krøyer enjoys a long association with Skagen, where he spends his summers, retreating to his Copenhagen studio during the winter to pursue his portrait works, and also spending time travelling to Spain, Italy Austria, Germany, Switzerland, and especially France, where he would exhibit canvases at the Paris Salons.
(Articles & Texticles)


Landing the catch, Hornbaek
From Articles & Texticles


Landing the catch, Detail
From Articles & Texticles


Hornbaek head studies
Articles & Texticles


Italian farm workers
From Articles & Texticles


Gypsy Granada, 1879
From Articles & Texticles


On a trip to Paris in 1888 he ran into Marie Martha Mathilde Triepcke, whom he had known in Copenhagen. They fell in love and, after a whirlwind romance, married on July 23, 1889 at her parents' home in Germany. Marie Krøyer, who was also a painter, became associated with the Skagen community, and was often represented in his paintings after their marriage. They separated in 1905.
(artinthepicture.com)


The Duet 1887 (Marie is on the left, in red)
From Articles & Texticles


Marie Krøyer
Oil on canvas, 1889
Public collection
From ARC


Marie Krøyer
Oil on canvas, 1890
Public collection
From ARC


Marie de perfil
Oil on canvas, 1891
Public collection
From ARC


Marie (from a cyanotype)
From Articles & Texticles


Marie en Ravello
Oil on canvas, 1891
Public collection
From ARC


Marie was the model for many of Krøyer's paintings including his most famous work “Summer evening on Skagen’s south beach with Anna Ancher and Marie Krøyer” of 1893. Skagen has become an artists colony by this time, and Krøyer is its ringleader in many ways. The social circle includes artists Michael and Anna Ancher, (whose portraits by Krøyer adorn the current Danish thousand-kroner bill) and many other artists, writers and poets.
(Articles & Texticles)


Summer Evening, Skagen South Beach
Anna Ancher & Marie Krøyern
From Articles & Texticles


Last self portrait
7 months before November 1909
From Articles & Texticles
His eyesight failed him gradually over the last ten years of his life until he was totally blind. Ever the optimist, he painted almost to the end of his life in spite of all these health obstacles. He painted some of his last masterpieces while half blind. He would joke that the eyesight in the one working eye became better with the loss of the other eye.
Krøyer died in November 21, 1909 at 58 years of age after several years of declining health from advanced syphilis. He had been in and out of hospitals, having suffered from bouts of mental illness.
(artinthepicture.com)


The studio of Peder Severin Krøyer
Copenhagen, 1888
Source flickr.com
Author Carl Curman



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