Tuesday, May 11, 2010

VELVET BRUEGHEL




Family of Jan Brueghel the Elder
From A&A


Jan Brueghel the Elder , the second son of Pieter Bruegel the Elder, was one of the most eminent early seventeenth century Flemish masters. He became famous for flowerpieces, landscapes, genre scenes and allegories and was nicknamed ‘Velvet Brueghel’ because of the delicacy of his brushwork.
He was born in Brussels in 1568. He studied watercolour with his grandmother, Mayken Verhulst, and oil painting with Peter Goetkindt. Between 1589/90 and 1596 Brueghel travelled in Italy, visiting Naples, Rome and Milan. In Milan he was received by Cardinal Federico Borromeo, who was to become a lifelong patron. Brueghel returned to Antwerp in 1596, becoming master of the guild of St. Luke in 1597 and dean in 1602. He visited Prague in 1604, gaining commissions from Emperor Rudolf II.
In 1608 Brueghel is recorded as being in Brussels as court painter to the Habsburg Regents of the Netherlands, Archduke Albrecht VII and the Infanta Isabella Clara Eugenia. He kept this appointment until his death. Around 1613 Brueghel travelled to the northern Netherlands on official business with Peter Paul Rubens and Hendrik van Balen, artists with whom he often collaborated…..
Admired throughout Europe, Brueghel's paintings are distinguished by a profusion of detail and painted with the delicacy of a miniature. The exquisite quality of his flowerpieces, and his fondness for Paradise landscapes, earned him the titles of ‘Flower’ and ‘ Paradise’ Brueghel. He died in the Antwerp cholera epidemic of 1625, which also claimed the lives of three of his children. Brueghel 's son Jan Breughel II (1601-1678) succeeded to his studio.
(richard-green.com)


Bouquet in a Clay Vase
Oil on wood, 1599-1607
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna
From Web Gallery of Art


Bouquet
Wood, 1603
Alte Pinakothek, Munich
From Web Gallery of Art


The Great Bouquet, 1607
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna
From Web Gallery of Art


Bouquet of Flowers in a Ceramic Vase
Painting - oil on panel, 1607
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Flowers in a Glass Vase, 1608
Private collection
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Bouquet of Flowers
Oil on oak, 1609-15
Staatliche Museen, Berlin
From Web Gallery of Art


Flowers
Oil on panel
Museo del Prado, Madrid
From Web Gallery of Art


Flowers in a Vase
Oil on panel
Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerp
From Web Gallery of Art


Bouquet of Flowers
Oil on oak panel
National Gallery, Prague
From Web Gallery of Art


Bouquet of Flowers (detail)
Oil on oak panel
National Gallery, Prague
From Web Gallery of Art


Still-Life with Garland of Flowers and Golden Tazza
Oil on wood, 1618
Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels
From Web Gallery of Art


Bouquet of Flowers in a Blue Vase
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Still Life with a Tazza
Garland and Bouquet of Flowers in a Porcelain Vase
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Still Life with Garland and Golden Tazza
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Tazza with Flowers
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


A flower painter and landscape artist, Jan Brueghel the Elder worked from nature. Bringing home the flora he depicted in his tightly composed still lifes, he often went great distances to find rare examples. When flowering plants had run their course around August, landscape season began. Brueghel mixed the past--artificial, jam-packed Mannerist compositions--with a modern insistence on observation from nature. He frequently provided lush, warm-toned woodland scenes densely populated with exotic animals and flowers as frames for other artists' figures.....
(The Getty)


Great Fish-Market
Oil on panel, 1603
Alte Pinakothek, Munich
From Web Gallery of Art


Guards in a Forest Clearing
Oil on oak, 1607
Staatliche Museen, Kassel
From Web Gallery of Art


Fair at a Riverside Village
Oil on canvas, c. 1614
Vizovice Castle, Czech Republic
From Web Gallery of Art


The Earthly Paradise
Oil on panel
Museo del Prado, Madrid
From Web Gallery of Art


The Battle of Issus
Oil on wood, 1602
Musée du Louvre, Paris
From Web Gallery of Art


Coastal Landscape with the Tomb of Scipion, 1607
Private collection
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Forest Landscape with Travellers, c. 1607
Private collection
Painting - oil on panel
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


River Landscape with Lumbermen
Oil on panel, 1608
Gemäldegalerie, Dresden
From Web Gallery of Art


Fish Market on the Banks of the River, 1611
Rheinisches Landesmuseum - Bonn (Germany)
Painting - oil on panel
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Equestrian Battle near a Mill
Painting - oil on canvas, 1612
Private collection
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Busy Village Street with Resting Travellers, 1614
Private collection
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


On the Road to Market
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Villagers on their Way to Market
Ink on paper, 1615-19
Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels
From Web Gallery of Art


Villagers on their Way to Market (above), presumably done between 1615 and 1619, represents peasants passing by on a small hill surrounded by trees, with a spreading landscape to the back. This structure had already been used much earlier in Flemish art, but Brueghel gave it a more contemporary expression by harmoniously combining the motifs of the centrally positioned country road and the distant view. The space is developed in a single movement along the diagonals, provided by the converging lines of trees, up to the vanishing point. Above it unfolds an open firmament giving the impression of endless space. The foreground is enlivened by picturesque and true-to-life scenes: a man feeding hay to two horses, women carrying baskets and jugs.
This snapshot of daily life in the country is transformed by Brueghel's refined taste into a poetic mood picture. The colouring of the drawing, with its characteristic combination of brown and blue ink, certainly helps this process. The outlines of the figures and the thin tree trunks, weaving their way decoratively into the sky, are drawn with great delicacy and detail, using sharp pen lines. Subtly applied blue ink provides coloured accents in the tops of the trees and in the background, which is constructed entirely with a brush tip in broad lines and small blurred dots, giving the drawing a muffled, refined character typical of many of Brueghel's miniature pictures.
Other signed versions of the composition are known, directly related to paintings for which they are probably preparatory studies. This picture may well be such a study. It could also be an independent work of art, exhibiting a finesse which would have made it very sought-after by contemporary collectors.
(Web Gallery of Art)


Mountain Landscape with View of a River Valley
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Flemish Dairy Farm, 1621
Painting - oil on canvas
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Immense Landscape with Travellers
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Landscape with the Chateau de Mariemont
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Leto and the Lycean Peasants
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


River Landscape with Landing
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


River Landscape with Resting Travellers
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Rustic Landscape with Inn and Travellers
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


The Return from the Hunt
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


The Wedding Feast
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Village Entrance with Windmill
Private collection
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Village Landscape with Self Portrait
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Village Street with Canal
From kr.blog.yahoo.com


Jan Brueghel the Elder was arguably the important European artist to have painted on copper. Certainly he was one of the most prolific – approximately half of his oeuvre was painted on this support and the majority of these works are landscapes. It seems likely that his fascination with this practice began during a six-year stay in Italy (1590-1596), where the use of copper was not unknown: Sebastiano del Piombo, Correggio and Parmigianino had produced works of this kind in the 1520s, followed in the 1560s by Vasari and Bronzino in Florence and then a decade later by Bartholomeus Spranger in Rome……It was while Brueghel was in Rome that he met Paul Bril, whose earliest known work on copper was done in 1592, and the two artists collaborated on a painting on copper the following year. There he also met the German Hans Rottenhammer, with whom he collaborated on two small pictures on copper, the Rest on the Flight (c. 1595; Mauritshaus, The Hague) and the Descent into Limbo (1597; Mauritshaus, The Hague). In 1595 and 1596, Brueghel visited Milan at the insistence of cardinal Federico Borromeo, one of his most important patrons, for whom he painted a number of small-scale landscapes on copper (Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, Milan)……
(colnaghi.co.uk)


Landscape with Hunters
Oil on copper
Musée des Beaux-Arts, Nantes
From Web Gallery of Art


Going to the Market
Copperplate, 1603
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna
From Web Gallery of Art


Earth (The Earthly Paradise)
Oil on copper
Musée du Louvre, Paris
From Web Gallery of Art


Bouquet
Oil on copper
Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, Milan
From Web Gallery of Art


A Flemish Fair
Oil on copper
Royal Collection, Windsor
From Web Gallery of Art


Entry of the Animals into Noah's Ark
Oil on copper
Wellington Museum, London
From Free Christ Images


Travellers on the Way
Oil on copper
Rockox House, Antwerp
From Web Gallery of Art


Jan Brueghel the Elder
etching by Anthony Van Dyck
engraving by an unknown printmaker
From The Fitzwilliam Museum
University of Cambridge


Like in the etchings of Frans Francken and Adam Van Noort Van Dyck enlisted the services of another printmaker to engrave a background (above). This has been done in dense, horizontal lines, but it is only partially finished. Jan wears a loose ruff collar like his brother Pieter, and fixes the viewer with a steady gaze.
(The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge)


Jan Brueghel the Elder
From The Fitzwilliam Museum
University of Cambridge


In this state a borderline frames the portrait (above), and even though the background has not been completed, a Latin title has been added calling Brueghel a painter of flowers and landscapes. The initials G.H. in the margin are those of Gillis Hendricx, who acquired fifteen of Van Dyck's etched plates around the same time as he received the eighty plates of the Iconography from the first publisher of the series, Martin Van den Enden. Hendricx then published his own edition, enlarged to one hundred portraits. He decided to transform one of the etchings - the self portrait - into a title page for the edition.
(The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge)


Jan Brueghel the Elder
From The Fitzwilliam Museum
University of Cambridge


This impression is the last recorded state of the plate (above). Since the changes made in 1645 by Gillis Hendricx the background has been completely finished in engraving. In comparison with the two earlier states the lines appear a good deal darker. This is due to the plate being re-etched, i.e. bathed again in acid in order to deepen the lines so to allow them to carry more ink. The plates had become worn through the pressure exerted on them in printing presses. It is not, therefore, through any additional work by another printmaker that the quality of Van Dyck's hand has been lessened, but rather through excessive printing. The portrait completely loses the subtle contrasts apparent in the earlier states. The lines in the hand have a patchy appearance, which reveals that the recesses in the plate are less able to carry ink effectively.
(The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge)
Jan had been given several nicknames, called "Velvet", "Flower" and "Paradise" Brueghel - the nicknames were to some extent an effort to distinguish between members of the same family. His father was often called the "Peasant" Brueghel and Jan's elder brother, Pieter was called "Hell Brueghel" because he exploited the growing market for pictures of hell-fire and demons.
(Canvas Creations Studio)



1 comment:

scott davidson said...

I went to a contemporary art fair in Shanghai recently, which was a real eye-opener. Chinese contemporary art has come leaps and bounds from the watery Zen landscapes to huge canvases of strange-looking beings. The prices being asked and paid were huge too.
Oriental, if not Chinese, my print of Jean-Léon Gérôme's painting, http://en.wahooart.com/A55A04/w.nsf/OPRA/BRUE-8BWS6R, bought some time ago from wahooart.com, is as lovely as ever.