Sunday, August 8, 2010

VEDUTISTA



Bernardo Bellotto (30 January 1720 – 17 October 1780) is one of the best-known exponents of Venetian veduta painting alongside Antonio Canale (also known as Canaletto), and Francesco Guardi. He was the nephew and student of Canaletto and bore the same epithet. However Canaletto and Guardi remained associated with their native city.
His paintings are characterised by their painstaking depiction of reality, mostly showing city scenes from panoramic perspectives. The vedutas he created also served as painted recordings of possessions and residences of the rulers whom he served as court painter.
(liechtensteinmuseum.at)


View of the Villa Cagnola at Gazzada near Varese
Oil on canvas, 1744
Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan
From Web Gallery of Art at wga.hu


By 1738, Bellotto was already a member of the Venician Painters' Guild. Still under Canaletto's guidance, the young Bellotto traveled extensively in Italy. He went to Rome, Florence, Turin, Milan and Verona. In each city he left memorable images, giving a precocious demonstration of his ability to capture not only the architectural or natural features, but also the specific quality of the light in each place he visited, the Villa Melzi d'Eril, the Gazzada, Arno in Florence, Signoria Square in Florence.
(francesfarmersrevenge.com)


Dresden from the Right Bank of the Elbe
above the Augustusbrücke
Oil on canvas, 1747
Gemäldegalerie, Dresden
From Web Gallery of Art at wga.hu


Dresden from the Left Bank of the Elbe
below the Fortifications
Oil on canvas, 1748
Gemäldegalerie, Dresden
From Web Gallery of Art at wga.hu


New Market Square in Dresden from the Jüdenhof
Oil on canvas, 1749-51
Gemäldegalerie, Dresden
From Web Gallery of Art at wga.hu


New Market Square in Dresden
Oil on canvas, 1750
Gemäldegalerie, Dresden
From Web Gallery of Art at wga.hu


After returning briefly to Venice, in the summer of 1747, Bellotto accepted an invitation from Augustus III, the Elector of Saxony, and moved to Dresden. During the ten years the artist spent there, he produced a remarkable series of wonderful views of the city and its surroundings. He repeated these paintings for the Prime Minister, Count Brühl, who eventually sold his collection to Catherine II the Great in St. Petersburg. With the purchase of the collection, Catherine the Great bought many of Bellotto's finest topographic works. The Old Market Square in Dresden, The New Market Square in Dresden (above), Pirna seen from the Right Bank of the Elbe are not only convincing in and for themselves, but also remind us of what happened to all that beauty after Dresden was bombed to the ground in the Second World War.
(francesfarmersrevenge.com)


The Neustadter Market in Dresden
Oil on canvas, 1750
Gemäldegallerie Alte Meister, Dresden
From artchive.com


Festung Königstein 1756-1758
National Gallery of Art, Washington DC
From commons.wikimedia.org


Ansicht von Wien, 1759
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wien
Source The Yorck Project
From commons.wikimedia.org


His later style is characterized by a cooler palette, more intense shadows, and an interest in the naturalistic depiction of cloudy skies which relates more closely to the Dutch school of painting. Most of his best work is naturally in Dresden and Warsaw and his pictures were considered to be so topographically faithful that they were used as guides for the rebuilding of the latter city after its devastation in the Second World War.
(artchive.com)


Nymphenburg Castle
Oil on canvas, 1761
Munich Residence
From commons.wikimedia.org


Rovine della kreuzkirche di dresda, 1765
Author sailko
From commons.wikimedia.org



Zwinger Waterway
Source allartpainting.com


Bellotto traveled to several other central European cities in subsequent years and painted cityscapes in each one; he lived in Vienna from 1759 to 1761, in Munich in 1761, and returned to Dresden in 1762. In 1767 he took up residence in Warsaw, where he became court painter to Stanislaw II, the last King of Poland, and remained in the city for the rest of his life.
(clarkart.edu)


Warsaw, 1770
author -Maciej Szcepańczyk
From commons.wikimedia.org



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