Sunday, October 24, 2010

NEW YORK CITY AND PARK SCENES



Paul Cornoyer is world famous for his paintings of New York City and its suburbs. This painter-teacher was born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1864 and died in East Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1923 (where he moved in 1917). He first studied at the St. Louis School of Fine Art (1881) and first exhibited in 1887. He went to Paris in 1889 and lived there until 1894, while studying painting at the Académie Julian in Paris with Lefebvre and Constant and with Louis Blanc.
(piercegalleries.com)
An unusually energetic artist, Cornoyer’s talents impressed several residents of St. Louis, who assisted with funds for his continued study in Europe. Extant works from the period reveal a surprisingly broad and spontaneous handling of pigment, indicating even at this early date the artist’s awareness of modern painting techniques. Accordingly, in 1889, twenty-five-year-old Paul Cornoyer left the Midwest to sail for Paris, where he enrolled in the Académie Julian. Here, he joined the ranks of countless other Americans who followed the well-known method of drawing from the nude model and completing weekly theme assignments. Cornoyer received criticism from Jules-Joseph Lefebvre and Benjamin Constant. It also appears that he, like most of his colleagues, pursued a routine of independent study by visiting museums and art galleries, where he was able to compare and contrast old masters’ techniques with those of the moderns.
(rhlovegalleries.com)


A Boulevard in Paris
From the-athenaeum.org


Cornoyer remained in France for five years, painting a number of city scenes such as the Parisian Boulevard (above), which vividly captures the charm and bustle of Parisian boulevards with onion-domed kiosks and other characteristic local details. The iconic image of the Arc de Triomphe, depicted at center, anticipates Cornoyer's later paintings of architectural landmarks in city parks and plazas in New York City.
(doylenewyork.com)
When Cornoyer arrived in Paris, impressionism had already become an international movement, and he was not immune to its magnetic influence. He rapidly assimilated its basic tenets, modified the north light of the studio, and took plein-air sketching trips. In addition to visits to Gr z, Montigny, and Barbizon, his sojourn also led him through much of the rest of Europe, including Venice and London. His first attempts at the impressionist manner resulted in a well-executed but eclectic style amalgamating effects of Monet and Sisley. Shortly, however, Cornoyer seems to have settled upon a more personal manner less dependent upon the use of broken color and fat pigment. He was particularly concerned with atmospheric effects and occasionally selected street scenes to demonstrate his ability with the complexities of compositional design. He varied his technique to suit the subject matter and its relative climatic conditions. Cornoyer submitted L’avenue du Maine to the Salon in 1892 in an effort to establish himself in the dynamic art community of Paris and his first award came that year from the American Art Association in Paris, which presented him with a first prize.
In 1894, the artist sailed to New York and subsequently returned to his native city, where he took a studio to begin his career in America. This was only a year after the successful exhibition of French and other impressionist painting at Chicago’s World’s Columbian Exposition, where Cornoyer did not exhibit. But since his former art teacher Halsey Ives had been director of the Fine Arts Department there, the artist must have hoped for a reasonable acceptance of his own imported style in St. Louis. In an attempt to eliminate a reputation of provincialism, Cornoyer sent his work to various national exhibitions in the east. He was also active locally and won a gold medal from the St. Louis Association of Painters and Sculptors.
(rhlovegalleries.com)


A View of St. Louis A Triptych
oil on canvas, laid down on board,1898
From the-athenaeum.org


His friend and collector of Cornoyer's work William Merritt Chase encourage Cornoyer to come to New York City. By that time he was somewhat famous in St. Louis for having painted a mural for Planter's Hotel of the city (1894) and large canvas A View of St. Louis (above) that showed Eads Bridge.
(piercegalleries.com)


West 59th Street & the New Netherlands Hotel
Oil on canvas
Provenance Judge Amy Kinker, St. Louis, Missouri
From owengallery.com


West 59th Street (above) is also known as Central Park South. Lined with luxury hotels and apartment buildings, this street has been in the grand style since the late 19th century. In 1892 the New Netherlands Hotel opened at Fifth Avenue and Fifty-Ninth Street. It reflected a long tradition in New York of the rich having their homes in hotel which provided deluxe service without servant problems. This view is looking East down 59th street towards grand army plaza and Fifth Avenue where the hotel was located. This building was replaced in the 1920’s with the current Sherry Netherlands Hotel.
(owengallery.com)


Madison Square Looking North Up Fifth Avenue
Pencil on paper, ca. 1900-1910
From spanierman.com


Studio Garden, East Gloucester
Oil on Canvas, 1900
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


Late Afternoon, Washington Square
Oil on canvas, 1908
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


In 1908, a writer for the St. Louis Daily Globe-Democrat suggested that “perhaps the best known painter who is a native of St. Louis is Paul Cornoyer. He has won an enviable reputation among the greatest artists, and the opinion prevails...that (America) will eventually recognize Cornoyer as one of its master painters.” James Huneker called Cornoyer an impressionist “. . . though sometimes with an approach to sentimentalism.” But because Cornoyer’s impressionism has since been eclipsed by more modern trends, such a prophecy has yet to be proven. It should be understood, however, that he was an accomplished and highly regarded painter throughout the era of American impressionism. From Parisian precedents, Cornoyer eventually developed a sophisticated cosmopolitanism, which he readily adapted to subjects taken from the New York environment. Despite his limitations in concept, he was a superb technician and one who was capable of a subjective description of an urban scene, a specific talent seldom demonstrated by other American impressionists.
(rhlovegalleries.com)
Cornoyer was mesmerized by New York City. As an academically oriented impressionist-tonalist, he began to paint tonal urban scenes and they sold almost immediately. He became an Associate of the National Academy of Design in 1909 (NYC) an was a member of that institution, the National Arts Club (NY), Salmagundi Club (1902, NY), Allied Artists of America (NY), Gallery on the Moors, National Society of Arts and Letters (NY), Newark Art Association and the society of Western Artists.
(piercegalleries.com)


After the Rain
The Dewey Arch, Madison Square Park
Oil on canvas
Private collection
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


Bryant Park
Private collection
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


Flat Iron Building
Private collection
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


Gloucester
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC


Madison Square on a Sunny Day
Oil on board
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


New York City View in Winter
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


The New York Library
Oil on canvas
Private collection
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


The Third Avenue El
Oil on canvas
Private collection
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


Washington Square
Oil on canvas
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


Winter in Washington Square
Oil on canvas
Private collection
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


Winter, Washington Square
Oil on canvas
Private collection
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


Strollers on a City Street
Pencil on paper, ca.1910 - 1920
From spanierman.com


Old House, Moonlight Gloucester, Massachusetts
Oil and charcoal on paper
mounted on canvas, circa 1910-1919
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


The Plaza at 59th Street
Oil on Canvas, 1910
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


December - Gloucester
Oil on canvas, circa 1916
Private collection
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


After the Rain
Oil on canvas, 1922-1927
Private collection
Entered by user rocsdad
From the-athenaeum.org


Washington Square, New York
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC


Dewey's Arch
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC


Paul Cornoyer was a much beloved teacher. For most of his life, he taught at the Mechanics Institute in New York, and later in 1917 in East Gloucester, Massachusetts. At the time of his death in 1923 he was involved with setting up an exhibition for the local art association.
(3d-dali.com)


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