Wednesday, November 24, 2010

IMPRESSIONIST GIVERNY



Lured by the ineffable beauty represented in Claude Monet's art and the promise of painting en plein air, artists from America and across Europe flocked to the French village of Giverny in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, transforming it from a sleepy hamlet to a colorful and thriving artists' community.
(albanyinstitute.org)

John Leslie Beck
From newtonma.gov
John Leslie Breck (1860-1899) was an early American exponent of the "new painting", avant-garde style, of Impressionism. Born at sea on a clipper ship in the South Pacific, he had a father who was a captain in the U.S. Navy. He grew up in the Boston area. He obtained his art training at the Munich Royal Academy, learning rapid brushstroke and dark Tonalism. Beginning in 1886, he studied at the Academie Julian in Paris Gustave Boulanger and Jules-Joseph Lefebvre, and soon became one of the original settlers of the important Impressionist art colony.
(Indianapolis Museum of Art).
He spent many years living and working with Impressionists in Giverny, France. Growing up in a metropolitan area exposed Breck to international art and culture at an early age. He was greatly attracted to the Impressionist movement, thriving in European cities and decided to travel to Giverny, France to work with Claude Monet.
(artexpertswebsite.com)


The river Epte, Giverny
Oil on canvas
From artnet.com


Giverny welcomed hundreds of artists from the late 1880s through World War I. Though Claude Monet did not encourage others to follow him to the village where he settled in 1883, Giverny quickly became a popular destination for international artists and students. Many artists stayed for long periods, socializing at the Hôtel Baudy, painting in and around the town, and often purchasing homes and studios, ultimately transforming the village into a flourishing artists’ colony.
(giverny.org)


Portrait of John Leslie Breck
By J. Carroll Beckwith
Collection of Margaret and Raymond Horowitz
From nga.gov


The mural painter and portraitist J. Carroll Beckwith spent the summer of 1891 in France, a visit that included a month or so in Giverny. His particular friend there was the American painter John Leslie Breck, and on September 2, as Beckwith recorded in his diary, he "began a little head of Breck." It is a strikingly warm and sympathetic painting, and a token in those respects of their close friendship; it is also a very faithful likeness, as a more formal portrait photograph of Breck shows.
(Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr.Senior curator of American and British paintingsat nga.gov)


Garden at Giverny
Oil on canvas, c. 1887
Terra Museum of American Art
Chicago, Illinois, United States
From ARC


The Gilded Dome, Spring
Oil on canvas, ca. 1893-1894
Private collection
From mcculloughsite.net


Grey Day on the Charles
Painting - oil on canvas, 1894
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (United States)
From the-athenaeum.org


Wetlands
Oil on panel, 1894
Private collection
From the-athenaeum.org


Early Snow
Oil on canvas, 1894
Private collection
From the-athenaeum.org


Giudecca Canal, Venice
Oil on canvas, 1897
From newfocuson.com


The Cliffs at Ironbound Island, Maine
Oil on canvas, 1898
Public collection
From ARC


Breck became personally involved with the Monet family through his relationship with Monet’s stepdaughter, Blanch Hoschedé. After Breck’s relationship with Hoschedé ended, he returned to United States and settled in Boston, where he exhibited at the St. Botolph Club. His impressionist style received much attention in American art communities. In both Boston and New York, artists and critics flocked to see Breck’s Impressionist paintings.
(artexpertswebsite.com)


Daffodils in Japanese Vase
Courtesy of Brown Corbin Fine Art
From .ci.newton.ma.us


Landscape
Oil on canvas
From artnet.com


Apple Tree
Painting was found in North Carolina
Remained in same family since original purchase
Original label from Boston framer William Allerton
Canvas stamp of Paul Foinet
From woodsideantiques.com


He continued to paint in avant-garde style. His Impressionist canvases provoked lively response in Boston and New York. His premature death in 1899 elicited a memorial exhibition at the St. Botolph Club, at which time the leadership and direction of the Boston school had been assumed by Edmund Tarbell.
(Indianapolis Museum of Art).


Santa Maria della Salute by Moonlight
Oil on canvas, 1897
From 1stdibs.com


View of Ipswich Bay
From artexpertswebsite.com


Ipswich
From artexpertswebsite.com


Some of Breck's most memorable canvases were executed after his return to America. He spent the remainder of his life painting along the Massachusetts coast, and some of his best work includes views of Ipswich. Moonlight, Ipswich clearly reflects the palette of Monet but also demonstrates Breck's masterful assimilation of Impressionist brushwork and strong sense of composition.
(Indianapolis Museum of Art).


1 comment:

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