Tuesday, December 7, 2010

DUTCH REALIST PAINTER




Anton Mauve
From aloj.us.es


Self-portrait
Oil on canvas
Gemeentemuseum Den Haag
Source "Die Haager Schule in München"
From commons.wikimedia.org


Self-portrait
Oil on canvas
Source Zelfportret (Anton Mauve) 1884-1888
Author Joop Anker
From commons.wikimedia.org

Anton Mauve
From vangoghmuseum.nl
Anton Mauve was a leading figure among Hague School painters during the latter part of the nineteenth century. Landscapes by these artists display a particular sensitivity for recording light and subtle atmospheric effects.
Particularly between 1870 and 1885, Mauve and his colleagues in The Hague strove to realistically capture the muted, watery effects of the Dutch climate, and the endless interactions between land and sky. A contemporary critic described the atmospheric, tonal efforts of Hague School artists:
The artists try, by preference, to render mood; and they give precedence to tone above color. Hence their almost exclusive rights over the depiction of what is known as "dirty weather."...They have revealed the poetry of grey in a hitherto unprecedented manner. In that grey atmosphere they find the ideal gradations of tone that they are looking for and we must recognize with admiration that they succeed in rendering what people had no idea of before with a fine sensitivity.
(M. E. Wieseman at oberlin.edu)


Riders in the Snow of the Woods at The Hague
From rijksmuseum.nl


A winter woodland scene with three riders (above), in gentle grey, greyish white, yellow, a little brown and red. It is misty. The branches are set against the softly sunlit sky; snow has fallen and there is more snow coming. Anton Mauve has captured the atmosphere of a winter day precisely: the freezing cold, the icy mist is almost tangible. By showing the riders from behind, the sense of desolation is even greater.
(rijksmuseum.nl)
The Hague School artists attempted to recreate the natural effects of light and atmosphere by depicting not only isolated weather conditions, but also more subtle seasonal variations. Mauve particularly excelled in rendering the profound silence and desolation of winter, in both oil and watercolor media. In a letter of 1885, Mauve's wife described routine winter outings with the artist: "With unflinching courage we have walked through the snow every day, armed with the paintbox, which seldom remained unused." Mauve apparently made small oil sketches from nature on canvases tacked to the inside of his paintbox lid; the completed studies were later applied to wood panels or mounted on stretchers.
(M. E. Wieseman at oberlin.edu)


The Cowherdess
Oil On Panel
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Milking Time
From lh6.ggpht.com


Weg Met Koeien Homeward Bound
From artmight.com


Anton Mauve (1838-88) was born in Zaandam, Holland. Against the wishes of his family, he decided to become a painter, and was apprenticed to Frederick van Os as a specialist in cattle. Much of his early work survives, mainly studies of individual cattle, usually painted plein air. Mauve soon tired of Van Os's academic formalism and became a close follower of Millet and Corot. Mauve's mature style is defined by quite free and expressive brushwork, very different from Millet's solidity and more closely related to Corot's incipient Impressionism.
(wunderlygalleries.com)


A Peasant Woman By A Barn
From artmight.com


Fishing boat on the beach
oil on canvas
Gemeentemuseum Den Haag
Source "Die Haager Schule in München"
From commons.wikimedia.org


From 1858 he lived periodically at Oosterbeek, the Dutch Barbizon, where he painted mainly animal subjects. In 1871 he moved to The Hague, where the human figure and coastal scenes assumed a greater importance in his work.
(artmight.com)
The son of a Mennonite preacher, he spent his youth in Haarlem. He also studied with the painters Wouterus Verschuur and Paul Gabriël. Mauve settled in Amsterdam in 1865, and moved to The Hague in 1871. In 1874 he married Ariëtte Sophia Jeannette Carbentus, a cousin of Vincent van Gogh; van Gogh (1853-1890) studied briefly with Mauve in 1881-82. Together with Willem Maris (1844-1910) and Hendrik Mesdag (1831-1915), Mauve founded the Hollandsche Teeken-Maatschappij (Dutch Drawing Society) in 1876. These three artists--along with Jozef Israëls, Jacob Maris, and Johannes Bosboom (1817-1891)--were the leading figures in the Hague School of painting. Works by these artists, produced between about 1860 and 1900, are characterized by a romantic nostalgia for seventeenth-century Dutch painting, and a particular sensitivity for recording light and atmospheric effects.
(oberlin.edu)


Morning Ride on the Beach
Oil on canvas, 1876
Current location Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
From commons.wikimedia.org


A group of horses descend at a leisurely pace from the dunes to the beach (above). It is a summer's day, around noon: the sun is high and shadows are short. Well-to-do, well-dressed equestrians are taking a relaxing ride on the beach at Scheveningen, a popular coastal resort of the day. At the foot of the dune are a number of bathing huts. These riding horses are an unusual feature in a piece by Anton Mauve. He normally painted workhorses and animals in their natural environment. He was particularly famous for his landscapes with sheep.
(rijksmuseum.nl)


Heath at Laren
Oil on canvas, 1887
Current location Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
From commons.wikimedia.org


Sheep on a dyke
oil on canvas
Gemeentemuseum Den Haag
Source "Die Haager Schule in München"
From commons.wikimedia.org


Shepherdess with a flock of sheep
Oil on canvas
Current location Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
From commons.wikimedia.org


Bringing home the flock
From artmight.com


Watching the flock
From artmight.com


Twilight
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Cottage on a canal
Oil on canvas
Current location Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
From commons.wikimedia.org


Mauve excelled in rendering the soft hazy atmosphere that lingers over the green meadows of Holland, and devoted himself almost exclusively to depicting the peaceful rural life of the fields and country lanes of Holland - especially of the districts near Oosterbeek and Wolfhezen, the sand dunes of the coast at Scheveningen, and the country near Laren, where he spent the last years of his life. A little sad and melancholy, his pastoral scenes are nevertheless conceived in a peaceful soothing lyrical mood, which is in marked contrast to the epic power and almost tragic intensity of J. F. Millet.
(RasMarley's photostream)
He was rather delicate all his days, and his poor health rendered him liable to fits of depression, which very frequently made themselves evident in his painting. He was profoundly influenced by Millet, and, like him, possessed a limited range of colour, silver greys, browns and greens as a rule making up his palette. Like the work of Cazin, his landscapes seem to reveal his moods and express the sadness which he feels. But in spite of his melancholy and his preference for subdued colours, Mauve's pictures are distinguished by great tenderness and an exquisite atmospheric quality which pervades all his landscapes. He was a hard worker as well as a successful one, and he soon gained recognition both in his own country and in England and America. He died at Arnhem in 1888.
(gardenofpraise.com)


1 comment:

Peter Pascal said...

I went to a contemporary art fair in Shanghai recently, which was a real eye-opener. Chinese contemporary art
has come leaps and bounds from the watery Zen landscapes to huge canvases of strange-looking beings. The
prices being asked and paid were huge too.
Oriental, if not Chinese, my print of Jean-Léon Gérôme's painting, http://en.wahooart.com/A55A04/w.nsf/OPRA/BRUE-8BWS6R,
bought some time ago from wahooart.com, is as lovely as ever.