Friday, December 17, 2010

PAMBANSANG KAMAO




Manny Pacquiao
From mpboxing.com


Manny Pacquiao
From gq.com


There is something special about a Manny Pacquiao fight. Outside the ring, his renaissance man-like life covering politics, sports and entertainment is followed intensely and documented with meticulous focus. In the late-eighties and early-nineties it was Mike Tyson who held the boxing world in his grasp because he delivered what we expected: a demolition: a hard, tight block of power shots and uppercuts that brought his opponents to their knees. In a Manny Pacquiao fight it is the unexpected that keeps us coming back.
(The Manny Pacquiao Experience, by Mike Colapietro, October 27, 2010 at www.boxingdispatch.com)
Emmanuel Dapidran Pacquiao (born December 17, 1978), also known as Manny Pacquiao, is a Filipino professional boxer and politician. He is a seven-division world champion, the first boxer in history to win nine world titles in seven different weight divisions. He is also the first boxer in history to win the lineal championship in four different weight classes. He was named "Fighter of the Decade" for the 2000s by the Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA).
Currently, Pacquiao is the WBO World Welterweight Champion (Super Champion) and is rated as the number 1 pound-for-pound best boxer in the world by several sporting news and boxing websites, including The Ring, Sports Illustrated, ESPN, NBC Sports, Yahoo! Sports and About.com
(celebritiesvideo.blogspot.com)

Just starting
From worldcorrespondents.com
At the age of 14, Pacquiao moved to Manila and lived, for a time, on the streets. He started boxing and made the Philippine national amateur boxing team where his room and board were paid for by the government. Pacquiao reportedly had an amateur record of 64 fights (60-4).
(celebritiesvideo.blogspot.com)
His potential was quickly noticed by the trainers and more starkly by the young opponents he’d skip rings around. Talent is nothing without the motivation to dedicate oneself to practice. “My family was very poor,” he said “that was my motivation. When I started winning, my prize money went to my mother.”
Growing up on a vegetable farm overlooking General Santos City with his sister and two younger brothers, life was far from easy for the future champion. Shortly after leaving school his father left home, never to return. The young Pacquiao worked as a baker’s assistant during the day and over the years boxed himself and his family out of poverty.
In 1994, at the age of 15 Manny was noticed and, along with 10 other promising teenagers from General Santos City, was shipped to Manila on a slow boat. None of the teenagers had a single centavo in their pocket. Manny would train hard in the gym and sell cigarettes on the streets to make ends meet. Some nights he’d be lucky enough to sleep on the dirty canvass in the ring, other nights he was out on the street.
(Manny Pacquiao: Pride of the Philippines, by Ben Hopkins, Traversing The Orient Magazine, Thursday, December 16, 2010 at mag.ttoasia.net)


Manny Pacquiao in Bangkok
Traversing The Orient Magazine
From mag.ttoasia.net


To succeed, Manny knew he had to work extra hard in the gym, bulk up and live a spartan lifestyle. Turning pro in 1995, weighing 106 pounds the teenage boxer slowly began to make a name for himself. A string of successes led to him wresting the Oriental flyweight title from Thai veteran Chokchai Chokwiwat in 1997 and a year later he came from behind to stop another Thai, Chatchai Sasakul, for the WBC 112- pound crown.
By 2001 his business manager Rod Nazario realized he was running out of opposition in Asia and took him to San Francisco in search of a manager willing to give him a break. However, it was Freddie Roach from the Wild Card Gym in Las Vegas who spotted the unpolished gem in Pacquiao.
From there the titles began to fall to Filipino southpaw. Fighting across the US he quickly built his reputation as a bell to bell, devil may care brawler. Fans called him the ‘Mexecutioner’ for mowing down challengers from south of the border and ‘Pacman’ for taking out anyone who got in the way.
(Manny Pacquiao: Pride of the Philippines, by Ben Hopkins, Traversing The Orient Magazine, Thursday, December 16, 2010 at mag.ttoasia.net)
His trainer,Freddie Roach was quoted:
"Manny has two advantages over his opponents. He's in better shape, and he'll take a punch. He averages 3,000 sit-ups and 44 sparring rounds per day; he runs about eight miles every other morning, uphill. I don't know what it is, but there's something inside of him. When he gets hit, he taps his gloves together as if to say, "Here I come." He gets after an opponent after he takes a shot, as if he liked it.
(pacquiaovideo.com)

Manny Pacquiao Boxing Titles:
Major World Titles:
• WBC Flyweight World Champion (112 lbs)
• IBF Junior Featherweight World Champion (122 lbs)
• The Ring Featherweight World Champion (126 lbs)
• WBC Super Featherweight World Champion (130 lbs)
• The Ring Junior Lightweight World Champion (130 lbs)
• WBC Lightweight World Champion (135 lbs)
• The Ring Junior Welterweight World Champion (140 lbs)
• WBO Welterweight World Champion (147 lbs)
• WBC Super Welterweight World Champion (154 pound)
Minor World Title:
• IBO Junior Welterweight World Champion (140 lbs)
Lineal Championship Titles:
• World Flyweight Champion (112 lbs)
• World Featherweight Champion (126 lbs)
• World Super Featherweight Champion (130 lbs)
• World Light Welterweight Champion (140 lbs)
Regional/International Titles:
• OPBF Flyweight Champion (112 lbs)
• WBC International Super Bantamweight Champion (122 lbs)
• WBC International Super Featherweight Champion (130 lbs)
Special Titles:
• WBC Emeritus Champion
• WBC Diamond Champion
• WBO Super Champion
(en.wikipedia.org)

Manny Pacquiao vs. Erik Morales III
Nov. 18, 2006
Photo: AP
From cgi2.sikids.com


This third match was to settle the score -- Morales had taken the first one by decision and Pacquiao the second by knockout. In this one, Pacquiao clearly had the upper hand, knocking out Morales in the third round.
(rthk.org.hk)


Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez II
March 15, 2008
Photo: AP
From cgi2.sikids.com


This rematch, aptly named "Unfinished Business," also ended with a disputed split-decision victory for Pacquiao, who earned his third world title in three divisions. Their first meeting, a split-decision win in Pacquiao's favor, ended on a sour note, thanks to a judging mistake -- one judge who had it 113-113 admitted making an error on the scorecard. He turned down a third match so he could move to lightweight.
(rthk.org.hk)


Manny Pacquiao vs. David Diaz
June 28, 2008
Photo: AP
From cgi2.sikids.com


With a ninth-round knockout of Diaz, Pacquiao became the only Filipino and Asian boxer to win five world titles in as many weight classes. He pummeled the then-WBC lightweight world champion, leaving Diaz to admit after the fight: "It was all his speed. I could see the punches perfectly, but he was just too fast."
(rthk.org.hk)


Manny Pacquiao vs. Oscar De La Hoya
Dec. 6, 2008
Photo: Robert Beck/SI
From cgi2.sikids.com


Pacquiao's eighth-round TKO over the "Golden Boy" put the petite puncher on the map. Though he had already claimed five world championships and was recognized as the leading pound-for-pound fighter since Mayweather's retirement, Pac-Man wasn't favored by all against De La Hoya. Many believed the 147-pound weight limit to be too high for Pacquiao. But he defied all critics when De La Hoya's corner threw in the towel before the start of the ninth round.
(rthk.org.hk)


Manny Pacquiao vs. Ricky Hatton
May 2, 2009
Photo: John Iacono/SI
From cgi2.sikids.com


Manny Pacquiao KO’s Ricky Hatton
Photographed by: John Iacono/SI


After a dispute over the fight purse, Pacquiao and Hatton finally agreed to terms for "The Battle of the East and West." The battle was short-lived as Pacquiao knocked out Hatton in the second round to win the IBO and Ring Magazine light welterweight titles.
(rthk.org.hk)


Manny Pacquiao vs Miguel Cotto
Nov. 14, 2009
Photo: Robert Beck/SI
From rthk.org.hk


This was hyped as the fight of the year, and it didn't disappoint. Cotto showed his aggression and strength in the opening rounds, but Pacquiao's dynamic (and relentless) punches, speed and power left the Puerto Rican welterweight champion bloodied and bruised midway through the bout. Cotto remained courageous throughout, but the referee ended the beating in the 12th round, giving Pacquiao his seventh world title in as many weight classes.
(rthk.org.hk)


Manny-Pacquiao
From 4.bp.blogspot.com


Manny Pacquiao displays his Title Belts
From pinoyexchange.com


Manny Pacquiao and his trainer (R)
From pinoyexchange.com


Manny Pacquiao displays his Title Belts
From theglobalherald.com


Megafight in Waiting-Pacquiao vs Mayweather
Photo: Robert Beck/SI
From rthk.org.hk


After Manny Pacquiao's recent destruction of Miguel Cotto, and Floyd Mayweather's recent comeback, everyone's clamoring for the top two active pound-for-pound fighters to go head-to-head. The matchup would, undoubtedly, produce a classic and clear No. 1. Could the victor rank among the greatest pound-for-pound brawlers of all time? Well, the fight needs to happen first.
(rthk.org.hk)


Manny Pacquiao
From tipakan.com


As the results roll in within the Philippines, Manny Pacquiao is destined to become a Congressman within the Philippines. Already a boxing legend, Manny Pacquiao may soon be introduced in the boxing ring as a boxing champion as well as a member of the Congress of the Philippines. One should expect that he will be spending alot of time in Congress, and much less time boxing in the ring.
(Manny Pacquiao Betting: Boxing Legend & Congressman, May 10, 2010 at casinonewsauthority.com)
Manny Pacquiao was inaugurated as a congressman on Monday, June 30, 2010 (Sunday in the U.S.) in his native Philippines in a moment that has far more significance to the world and to his people than anything he’s previously done. To this point in his young life, he’s largely been an entertainer. He’s a movie star and a recording artist and, of course, one of the greatest boxers of all-time. He’s also an extraordinarily generous man, giving away thousands of dollars to feed the needy and provide shelter for the homeless. His contributions help teach the illiterate to read and to clothe those who have none. It’s why he’s become a national icon and one of the most significant figures in the history of the Philippine Islands.
This is a man who had to leave home and drop out of school at 14, not to box but to go to work to earn money for his impoverished family. But he’s taken the next step toward providing a better life for the indigent people of his country by winning a political office. He completed a 10-day course required of incoming legislators called Development Legislation and Governance at the Development Academy of the Philippines.
(Pacquiao Embarks on Career in Political Ring by Kevin Iole, July 3, 2010 at tipakan.com)


1 comment:

rozina islam vabna said...


This is great! i have always wanted to know where all the yummy Vegan places were and now i can easily eat out at these place or order in! thanks so much!
boxing rings