Thursday, July 29, 2010

"ONE OF THE FOREMOST WOMAN PAINTERS IN NEW YORK"



Jane Peterson (Illinois 1876 – 1965 Kansas) was recognized as one of the foremost women painters in the United States. Her works are housed in museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of the City of New York, the National Museum of Women in the Arts and Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C.
She attended the Pratt Institute and later studied at the Art Students League in New York with Frank Vincent Dumond. Following her studies, Jane Peterson was offered several teaching posts, none of which she would keep long. Instead of confining herself to the American art scene, she decided to continue her education in Paris, Venice, London and Madrid, where she studied with such notable artists as Jacques Emile Blanche, André Lhote, and Joaquin Sorolla.
Through her instruction Peterson developed vision unique in American art. She went on to influence later American artists in a teaching position at the Art Students League, beginning in 1913. Her works are a blend of Impressionist and Expressionist styles, combining an interest in light and in depiction of the spontaneous moment with the use of broad swaths of vibrant color. She is well known for her vivid, richly painted still life, and beach scenes created along the Massachusetts coast.
(From alazraki.com)


The Red Cross
From sheldonartmuseum.org


Street Scene
From bestpriceart.com


Gloucester Harbor
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Gloucester Harbor (framed)
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


As a woman, her life was much more independent and adventurous than most of her contemporaries, and she traveled widely to paint. Jane Peterson has an individualistic style, with bold color combinations and unique designs, and her canvases intermingle Fauvist and Impressionist tendencies with academic drawing.
Internationally known writer and astronomer Percival Lowell exhibited Peterson’s work in Paris and secured her first one-woman exhibition in Boston which led to a near sell-out exhibition in New York City. By 1912, Peterson had many rich patrons…..
Traveling and painting with Sorolla, Louis Comfort Tiffany, John Singer Sargent, Childe Hassam and Maurice Prendergast, Peterson was in an influential art entourage and made it evident she could paint with the best of the male painters.
(stateoftheartgalleryandsculpturegarden.com)


Figures Along a Venetian Canal, Summer
Oil on paper mounted to canvas, circa 1903-1909
From piercegalleries.com


Figures Along a Venetian Canal, Summer (above) was painted circa 1903-1909 and shows dramatically how influenced Peterson was by the bold exciting colors that were being experimented with by members of the Paris Fauvist movement. In this oil painting Peterson is a fine draftsman as well as colorist. With broad, sweeping strokes of pure color she juxtaposes light against dark, while at the same time with the use of various tones and hues of white and off-white pigments a viewer's eyes scans the entire picture from the two bonneted female figures at the right of the picture, to the figures along a canal bridge to the stucco building in the distance. The day is bright and filled with sunshine but tall buildings that line the canal give shade and shadow, allowing the picture to develop depth and charm.
(piercegalleries.com)


A Landing along Grand Canal, Venice
Oil on board, ca. 1910
San Antonio Museum of Art
gift of Mrs. Wylie F. Creel in memory of Dr. Wylie F. Creel
From samuseum.org


Venice
From owengallery.com


Peterson was delighted by the various artist colonies and new artistic freedoms Europe provided. She decided to prolong what was only to be a summer vacation into a permanent stay in Paris. She admired the emerging modern approach to color, form and imagery, but did not adopt these techniques, staying faithful to her own individual style.
Venice (above) is a charming example from Peterson’s time there, depicting a number of gondoliers navigating the canals. This scene conveys her skill in rendering the complexities of light, shadow and reflection, and she creates a harmonious composition by eliminating unessential detail, keeping outlines loose and using a rich, colorful palette.
(owengallery.com)


Pitchfork Falls, Alaska
Watercolor, circa 1916
From postroadgallery.com


During World War I, Peterson painted war-oriented subjects that were exhibited and sold (or donated) to promote Liberty Loans and the American Red Cross efforts. In 1924, Peterson’s "Toilette" received rave reviews at the New York Society of Painters and a one-woman show on Fifth Avenue sold-out. By this time, she had won numerous awards, was a Fellow at the National Academy of Design and a member of many art clubs including the American Watercolor Society, Audubon Artists, Pen & Brush Club, and the National Association of Women Artists.
In 1925, "The New York Times" characterized Peterson as “one of the foremost women painters in New York.” Known for her colorful, post-impressionistic paintings of Gloucester streets and harbor on Cape Ann; palm trees along the Florida coast; street scenes in Paris, Istanbul and New York City; boating views in Venice, Italy and elsewhere, Peterson also painted floral subjects and dynamic genre-like-portraits.
(stateoftheartgalleryandsculpturegarden.com)


Landscape near Palm Beach (pair)
Watercolor & gouache on paper mounted on board
From alazraki.com


Landscape near Palm Beach (above) is an excellent example of Peterson’s landscapes in the vicinity of Palm beach, where she lived and worked. The wonderful color and light mood of the pair recalls the influence of her teacher Sorolla, but Peterson’s tendency to simplified, almost abstracted forms and flat planes of color gave her a unique interpretation of such scenes and put her in step with modern trends in America.
(alazraki.com)


Parade
Gouache, watercolor, charcoal, and graphite on gray wove paper
Gift of Martin Horwitz, 1976
From metmuseum.org


After marrying in 1925, Peterson devoted most of her time to painting floral subjects. The artist painted in her beautiful gardens at her estate in Ipswich, New York. In 1946, she wrote a how-to book on painting flowers---“Flower Painting”.
(artandinfluence.blogspot.com)
One of the factors she considered part of her success was her chosen status as a single woman. For nearly three decades she had been able to focus solely on her art. Finally, at the age of 49, Peterson married a wealthy widower named M. Bernard Philipp. For the next five years, until his death in 1929, the couple spent winters in New York City and summers at his Rocky Hill estate in Ipswich. Unable to travel and paint in exotic places as was her habit, Peterson began to paint flowers instead. Every summer for the next quarter of a century the artist planted, cultivated, and then painted zinnias, peonies, and petunias at Rocky Hill. By the time she died in 1965, Jane Peterson had come to be known more for her Ipswich flower paintings than for her views of Paris, Constantinople, Turkey or any of the other exotic locales she had visited in her younger days.
(From escapesnorth.com)


Lilies
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Lilies (framed)
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Zinnias and Pansies
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Zinnias and Pansies (framed)
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Still Life of Roses
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Still Life of Roses (framed)
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Rhododendrens
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com



Rhododendrens (framed)
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Bouquet of Red Flowers
Oil on canvas
Public collection
From ARC


Because of her unique palette, energetic brushwork and appealing subjects, Jane Peterson is one of the most sought after painters in the art world. She is admired and praised for developing an individualistic style, intermingling bold color combinations and for creatively constructing unique designs in masterfully rendered avenues of pigment. Canvases with aspects of Fauvist and Impressionist tendencies rank among her finest work.
(piercegalleries.com)
In her lifetime, Jane Peterson had over 80 one person shows. She was a Fellow at the prestigious National Academy of Design and a member of many art organizations, including The American Watercolor Society, The Allied Artists of America, The National Association of Women Artists and the Pen and Brush Club.
Jane Peterson died at an old age in 1965.
(artandinfluence.blogspot.com)



Wednesday, July 28, 2010

THE YOUNG MAN'S GUIDE



THE YOUNG MAN'S GUIDE
By WM. A. ALCOTT
(Adapted from The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Young Man's Guide, by William A. Alcott)

The infant seeks to grasp the burning lamp;—the parent endeavors to dissuade him from it. At length he grasps it, and suffers the consequences. Finally, however, if the parent manages him properly, he learns to follow his advice, and obey his indications, in order to avoid pain. Such, at least, is the natural result of rational management. It is only when the parent neglects or refuses to give advice, and for a long time manifests little or no sympathy with his child, that the habit of filial reliance and confidence is destroyed.
It was wisely said; 'He who would pass the latter part of his life with honor and decency, must, when he is young, consider that he shall one day be old, and when he is old, remember that he has once been young.' Still more does it disqualify us for giving advice?
Not a few young men either have no fixed principles, no governing motive at all, or they are influenced by those which are low and unworthy. It is painful to say this, but it is too true. But what young man is there who is not influenced more or less, by all the motives which have been enumerated? Who is there that does not seek one’s own happiness? Who does not desire to please his parents and other relatives, his friends and his neighbors? Who does not wish to be distinguished for his attachment to country and to liberty?
Too many young men expect happiness from wealth. This is their great object of study and action, by night and by day. Not that they suppose there is an inherent value in the wealth itself, but only that it will secure the means of procuring the happiness they so ardently desire. But the farther they go, in the pursuit of wealth, for the sake of happiness, especially if successful in their plans and business, the more they forget their original purpose, and seek wealth for the sake of wealth. To get rich, is their principal motive to action. So it is in regard to the exclusive pursuit of sensual pleasure, or civil distinction. The farther we go, the more we lose our original character, and the more we become devoted to the objects of pursuit, and incapable of being roused by other motives.
Now we cannot all become 'lords' and 'gentlemen,' if we would. There must be a large part of us, after all, to make and mend clothes and houses, and carry on trade and commerce, and, in spite of all that we can do, the far greater part of us must actually work at something; otherwise we fall under the sentence; 'He who will not work shall not eat.' Yet, so strong is the propensity to be thought 'gentlemen;' so general is this desire amongst the youth of this proud money making universe, that thousands upon thousands of them are, at this moment, in a state which may end in starvation; not so much because they are too lazy to earn their bread, as because they are too proud!
And what are the consequences? A lazy youth becomes a burden to those parents, whom he ought to comfort, if not support. Always aspiring to something higher than he can reach, his life is a life of disappointment and shame. If marriage befalls him, it is a real affliction, involving others as well as him. His lot is a thousand times worse than that of the common laborer. Nineteen times out of twenty a premature death awaits him: and, alas! How numerous are the cases in which that death is most miserable, not to say ignominious!
One of the greatest obstacles in the road to excellence is indolence. An indolent person is scarcely human; he is half quadruped, and of the most stupid species too. He may have good intentions of discharging a duty, while that duty is at a distance; but let it approach, let him view the time of action as near, and down go his hands in languor. He wills, perhaps; but he unwills in the next breath.
What is to be done with such a man, especially if he is a young one? He is absolutely good for nothing. Business tires him; reading fatigues him; the public service interferes with his pleasures, or restrains his freedom. His life must be passed on a bed of down. If he is employed, moments are as hours to him—if he is amused, hours are as moments. In general, his whole time eludes him; he lets it glide unheeded, like water under a bridge. Ask him what he has done with his morning,—he cannot tell you; for he has lived without reflection, and almost without knowing whether he has lived at all.
The indolent man sleeps as long as it is possible for him to sleep, dresses slowly, amuses himself in conversation with the first person that calls upon him, and loiters about till dinner. Or if he engages in any employment, however important, he leaves it the moment an opportunity of talking occurs. At length dinner is served up; and after lounging at the table a long time, the evening will probably be spent as unprofitably as the morning: and this it may be, is no unfair specimen of his whole life. And is not such a wretch, for it is improper to call him a man—good for nothing? What is he good for? How can any rational being be willing to spend the precious gift of life in a manner so worthless, and so much beneath the dignity of human nature? When he is about stepping into the grave, how can he review the past with any degree of satisfaction? What is his history, whether recorded here or there,—in golden letters, or on the plainest slab—but, 'he was born' and 'he died!'
There are many things which, viewed without any reference to prevailing habits, manners, and customs, appear utterly unworthy of attention; and yet, after all, much of our happiness will be found to depend upon them. We are to remember that we live—not alone, on the earth—but among a multitude, each of whom claims, and is entitled to one’s own estimate of things. Now it often happens that what we deem a little thing, another, who views the subject differently, will regard as a matter of importance. For who does not know that throughout the physical world, the mightiest results are brought about by the silent working of small causes? It is not the tornado, or the deluge, or even the occasional storm of rain that renews and animates nature, so much as the gentle breeze, the soft refreshing shower, and the still softer and gentler dews of heaven.
Indulgence far short of gross drunkenness and gluttony is to be deprecated; and the more so, because it is too often looked upon as being no crime at all. Nay, there are many persons, who boast of a refined taste in matters connected with eating and drinking, who are so far from being ashamed of employing their thoughts on the subject, that it is their boast that they do it. 'It is not the quantity or the quality of the meat, or drink, but the love of it, that is condemned:' that is to say, the indulgence beyond the absolute demands of nature; the hankering after it; the neglect of some duty or other for the sake of the enjoyments of the table.
He, who indulges one little draught of alcoholic drink, is in danger of ending a tippler; he who gives loose to one impure thought, of ending the victim of lust and sensuality. Nor is it one single gross, or as it were accidental act, viewed as insulated from the rest—however injurious it may be—that injures the body, or debases the mind, so much as the frequent repetition of those smaller errors, whose habitual occurrence goes to establish the predominating choice of the mind, or affection of the soul.
A young man is not far from ruin, when he can say, without blushing, I don't care what others think of me. To be insensible to public opinion, or to the estimation in which we are held by others, by no means indicates a good and generous spirit.
But to have a due regard to public opinion is one thing, and to make that opinion the principal rule of action, quite another. There is no greater weakness than that of letting our happiness depend too much upon the opinion of others. Other people lie under such disadvantages for coming at our true characters, and are so often misled by prejudice for or against us, that if our own conscience condemns us, their approbation can give us little consolation. On the other hand, if we are sure we acted from honest motives, and with a reference to proper ends, it is of little consequence if the world should happen to find fault. Mankind, for the most part, is so much governed by fancy, that what will win their hearts to-day, will disgust them to-morrow…..
A wise man, when he hears of reflections made upon him, will consider whether they are just. If they are, he will correct the faults in question, with as much cheerfulness as if they had been suggested by his dearest friend.
There are some persons who never appear to be happy, if left to themselves and their own reflections. All their enjoyment seems to come from without; none from within. They are ever for having something to do with the affairs of others. Not a single petty quarrel can take place, in the neighborhood, but they suffer their feelings to be enlisted, and allow themselves to "take sides" with one of the parties. Those who possess such a disposition are among the most miserable of their race.
So long as the phrase 'he is a good man,' means that the person spoken of is rich, we need not wonder that every one wishes to be thought richer than he is. When adulation is sure to follow wealth, and when contempt would be sure to follow many if they were not wealthy; when people are spoken of with deference, and even lauded to the skies because their riches are very great; when this is the case, we need not wonder if men are ashamed to be thought poor. But this is one of the greatest dangers which young people have to encounter in setting out in life. It has brought thousands and hundreds of thousands to pecuniary ruin.
The shame of being thought poor leads to everlasting efforts to disguise one's poverty. The carriage—the domestics—the wine—the spirits—the decanters—the glass;—all the table apparatus, the horses, the dresses, the dinners, and the parties, must be kept up; not so much because he or she who keeps or gives them has any pleasure arising there from, as because not to keep and give them, would give rise to a suspicion of a want of means. And thus thousands upon thousands are yearly brought into a state of real poverty, merely by their great anxiety not to be thought poor. Look around carefully, and see if this is not so. There are thousands of families at this very moment, struggling to keep up appearances. They feel that it makes them miserable; but you can no more induce them to change their course, than you can put a stop to the miser's laying up gold.
Our life is a life of constant anxiety, desire to overreach, and general gloom; enlivened now and then, by a gleam of hope or of success. Even that success is sure to lead to farther adventures; till at last, a thousand to one, that your fate is that of 'the pitcher to the well.'
As young men, who crowd to the army in search of rank and renown, never look into the ditch that holds their slaughtered companions, but have their eye constantly fixed on the commander-in-chief; and as each of them belongs to the same profession, and is sure to be conscious that he has equal merit, every one dreams himself the suitable successor of him who is surrounded with aides-de-camp, and who moves battalions and columns by his nod;—so with the rising generation of 'speculators.' They see those whom they suppose nature and good laws made to black shoes, or sweep chimneys or streets, rolling in carriages, or sitting in palaces, surrounded by servants or slaves; and they can see no earthly reason why they should not all do the same. They forget the thousands, and tens of thousands, who in making the attempt, have reduced themselves to beggary.
'Your eyes open, your thoughts close, will go safe through the world,' is a maxim which some have laid down; but it savors rather too much of selfishness. 'You may learn from others all you can, but you are to give them as little opportunity as possible for learning from you,' seems to be the language, properly interpreted. Suppose every one took the advice, and endeavored to keep his thoughts close, for fear he should either be misunderstood, or thought wanting in wisdom; what would become of the pleasures of conversation? Yet these make up a very considerable item of the happiness of human life.
'Keep your eyes open,' however, is judicious advice. How many who have the eyes of their body open, keep the eyes of the soul perpetually shut up. 'Seeing, they see not.' Such persons, on arriving at the age of three or four score, may lay claim to superior wisdom on account of superior age, but their claims ought not to be admitted. A person who has the eyes both of his mind and body open, will derive more wisdom from one year's experience, than those who neglect to observe for themselves, from ten. Thus at thirty, with ten years acquaintance with men, manners and things, a person may be wiser than another at three times thirty, with seven times ten years of what he calls experience. Sound practical wisdom, cannot, it is true, be rapidly acquired anywhere but in the school of experience, but the world abounds with men who are old enough to be wise, and yet are very ignorant. It is hence easy to see why some men who are accounted learned, are yet in common life very great fools.



Monday, July 26, 2010

“THE OPEN AIR IS MY STUDIO”



Sharing a common country of birth (Holland) and a love of color and boldness in their paintings, Vincent Van Gogh and Anthony Thieme (1888-1954) both endured emotional turmoil and both ended their lives the same way.
Striking out on his own at the age of seventeen, Johannes Thieme (he later changed his first name to Anthony), became a fearless and adventurous traveler….. Along his artistic way he studied oil painting, watercolor, printmaking, and drawing in Dusseldorf, Naples, the Hague, and Paris.
(mcdougallfinearts.com)
As soon as he turned 14, Thieme enrolled in Holland’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Afterward, he studied for two years at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague. Yet even after this training, Thieme still could not convince his parents to support his desire to become an artist.
Thieme’s career began in Germany, where he was employed as a stage designer while he developed his painting skills. After three years, he traveled to Switzerland, then Italy, where he worked as a stage designer in Turin. In 1909, he enrolled in the Scuola di Belle Arti, where he studied for a year before moving on to Naples. He spent two years sketching and painting in Naples, then traveled to London before taking the proceeds from the sale of some of his sketches and booking passage to New York.
(vallejogallery.com)
Thieme traveled to the United States at the age of 22. He quickly found work as a stage designer at the Century Theater in New York, designing sets for the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. When the commission ended, he traveled to South America, primarily Brazil and Argentina. Stage work again provided his livelihood. A return to Europe followed with further work in England, France, and Italy.
Returning to the United States with a contract for additional stage work, Thieme found himself in Boston. He discontinued work on the stage in 1928 and from then on made his living with the sales of his paintings and etchings. He exhibited his work frequently at the Grand Central Art Galleries in New York. He continued to travel widely; Mexico, Guatemala, Florida, and France were major destinations, always painting en plein air.
(wikipedia.org)


Autumn on the Lake
Oil on Canvas, Circa 1920
Provenance: Private Chicago Collection
From vallejogallery.com


Emotionally cool with the sense of the coming crisp weather, an estate along a still lakeshore (above) has just the slightest suggestion of ripple across the water’s glassy surface. An absolutely amazing artistic accomplishment to make this blend of diverse application techniques work so well together on one canvas. It appears that layers of color had to be blended to create the reflective water, polished down ever so delicately with a brush. In stark contrast, the tree trunks look like they are oil straight out of the tube and pushed along the canvas vertically. Heavy impasto, aggressive brushwork and even spots of bare canvas intentionally peeking through are all noticeable.
The painting contains multiple levels of appreciation, which must be viewed first hand to realize. While the artist has set the season, especially with the burnt umber and varied foliage, he chose to keep the exact lake unidentified in his original title. Perhaps the human figure, centrally near a small boat hull - in this viewer’s opinion - would be the one to ask.
Thieme historically worked on scenes throughout the Cape Ann Peninsula, traveling about in a modified horse-drawn wagon he converted into an art studio. Likewise, later, he spent significant amount of time in Florida and the Caribbean. He still owns a reputation for establishing friendly relationships with locals and visitors alike, but would tolerate no interruptions while working at a canvas.
(vallejogallery.com)
In 1929, Thieme married Lillian Beckett and bought a cottage in Rockport, Mass. He set up a studio in the area, which had become a summer resort destination for nationally-known artists. According to a 1961 account by John Kieran, “There are studios on almost every street, and every day in summer you see outdoor groups of pupils working under different masters at picturesque points along the roadside.” Thieme opened the Thieme Summer School of Art in Rockport in 1929 and served as its director until 1943.
(Alexandra A.Jopp at bestamericanart.blogspot.com)


A Cape Ann Retreat
Oil on Canvas, Circa 1929
From vallejogallery.com


A Cape Ann Retreat (framed)
Oil on canvas
From fada.com


Portrayed with a spectral array of autumn colors, Thieme has found a restful cabin in a secluded location on the Cape Ann Peninsula (above). Showing his diversity with subject matter, he incorporates the reflective coastal inlet and ever-present boats of the area with the aged structure. The work becomes a blend of the things he is known for: his professional handling of light and shadow, strong natural coloration and great impasto application of his oil to canvas.
Silent and serene, one’s senses are activated by implication to Thieme’s work. The visual stimulation conveys the cool, almost icy touch of the water, and the rarely broken silence of movement through the crackling ground cover. Inside would be a fireplace of warmth and strong . His heavy palette approach gives a depth to the objects which creates a dimensional realism.
Thieme’s wife, Becky, once wrote of her husband “he often says that he was born 50 years to late”. Thieme longed for simpler times amid the march of progress. He worked relentlessly at his art, and became one of the premier, internationally recognized members of the Cape Ann and Rockport School of Art. He painted scenes from the diverse Cape Ann Peninsula, traveling about in a modified horse-drawn wagon he converted into an art studio. He owned a reputation for establishing friendly relationships with locals and visitors alike, but would tolerate no interruptions while working at a canvas.
(vallejogallery.com)


Rockport Afternoon
Oil on Canvas, Circa 1929
From vallejogallery.com


Thieme’s favorite subjects were the historic fishing ports on the north shore of Massachusetts. His admiration for the gleaming colors and the lyric quality of the marine subjects dominated his style. “The open air is my studio,” Thieme said. “A good landscape painter must paint fast to catch the light of any hour. Unless you know what to put in, what to leave out, the result is a mess.”
(Alexandra A. Jopp at bestamericanart.blogspot.com)


Rockport Waterfront
Oil on Canvas, Circa 1935
From vallejogallery.com


The net fishermen of Rockport (above), in an array of a lobster boat, yawls of colorful hues and a seaworthy white rowed boat, work aboard their crafts in the chill morning light. Local onlookers fill the scene, and the conversations over coffee would drift from fishing to social affair and politics back to fishing. The work becomes of blend of the things Thieme is known for artistically; his professional handling of light and shadow, strong natural coloration and great impasto application of his oil to canvas.
Silent and serene, the water holds on to Thieme’s special ability to portray wet reflections and the soft tidal sensation of slow movement in the harbor. No power boat wake pushing through the soft light that mutes the distance across the harbor, as the sea birds glide above. Most heads are down, looking at the tasks at hand, or just keeping a close eye on the others.
Thieme’s wife, Becky, once wrote of her husband “he often says that he was born 50 years too late”. Thieme longed for simpler times amid the march of progress. He worked relentlessly at his art, and became one of the premier, internationally recognized members of the Cape Ann and Rockport schools of art.
(vallejogallery.com)


Mountain Cabin
Oil on canvas
From fada.com


Still Waters
Oil on canvas
From fada.com


Autumn in Rockport
Oil on Canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Cape Ann Street Scene in Autumn
Oil on Canvas
From clarkegalleries.com


Circus at Night
Oil on Canvas
From clarkegalleries.com


Main Street, Rockport
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Main Street, Rockport (framed)
Oil on canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


His technique differs from most artists of his time period but it is thought to be a product of his traveling lifestyle, and being a part of the world. He typically wintered in South Carolina, Guatemala, Mexico, and the Bahamas, as well as in St. Augustine, Florida, where he took a studio in 1947.
Because of his frequent intercourse with multiple environments, he was enveloped in different cultures and scenes that can be shown through his colors, strokes, and subject matters. It was so refined that art critics to connoisseurs alike praised his work. He has won numerous prizes, has and is featured in a number of museums, and has found a permanent place in literature.
(fineoldart.com)
Anthony Thieme received favorable criticism and artistic awards during his career, including two in 1930: the Delano Prize from the New York Watercolor Club, and the Athenaeum Prize at the Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts; the Lucien Powell Citizen Jury Prize from the Los Angeles Museum (1931); the Gold Medal for the Best Painting in New England by the Contemporary Artists Association (1944); and an award for the best marine painting at the Pan-American Art Show in Miami (1949). Anthony and “Becky” wintered in St. Augustine, and after he became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1935, they visited Mexico and Guatemala where the hot, primary colors of the two Spanish- language countries influenced his palette.
(mcdougallfinearts.com)
Thieme was a strong proponent of the visual arts and held memberships in many associations: American Water Color Society; Art Alliance of America; Salmagundi Club; Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts; Boston Art Club; Providence Water Color Club; Boston Society of Artists; North Shore Art Association; Springfield Art League; Rockport Art Association; New York Water Color Club; American Artists Professional League; Gloucester Society of Artists; Art Alliance of Philadelphia; Philadelphia Painters Club; and the National Arts Club.
As a function of these many memberships, he was an active exhibitor: National Academy of Design 1930-1934; Art Institute of Chicago 1930; Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts 1929-1931; Corcoran Gallery of Art 1932; Los Angeles Museum of Art 1930, 1931 (prize); Albright Art Gallery 1932; Detroit Institute of Art 1931; Salmagundi Club 1929 and 1931 (prizes); Springfield, Utah 1928 and 1931 (prizes); Gloucester Art Association 1928 (prize); Springfield Art League 1927 and 1928 (prizes); North Shore Art Association 1930 (prize); Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts 1930 (prize); Jordon Marsh Exhibition (Boston) 1944 (medal); New York Water Color Club 1930 (prize); Boston Tercentenary Exhibition 1930; Ogunquit Art Center 1930; New Haven Painters and Clay Club 1931 (prize); Washington Water Color Club 1931(prize); Los Angeles Museum of Art; Buck Hill Falls Art Association (Pennsylvania) 1938 (prize); he also exhibited in Belgium, France and Holland.
Anthony Thieme's work is held in high regard by collectors and Museums alike, and he is represented in many major collections: Boston Museum of Fine Art; Pittsfield Museum of Art (Massachusetts); Albany Institute of History and Art; Dayton Art Institute; City of New Haven Collection; College of Springfield (Utah); University of Iowa; Museum of Modern Art; Los Angeles Museum of History, Science & Art; Beach College, Storrs, Connecticut; Montclair Art Museum (New Jersey).
(Edwin J. Andres Fine Art at hlchalfant.com)



Wednesday, July 21, 2010

WINTER SCENES



Along with Anthony Thieme, Aldro Thompson Hibbard (1886 – 1972) was an important founding member of the Rockport Art Association. Hibbard had the additional distinction of being a gifted baseball player who was asked to join professional teams. Instead he gave up sports to become a professional artist. He studied art in Massachusetts with contemporaries Edmund Tarbell and Frank Benson. Because he showed great talent, he was given a traveling scholarship from the Boston Museum School to study abroad.
(blueheronfa.com)
In 1915, Hibbard became an instructor of painting at Boston University. He painted winter scenes of New England.....especially in Jamaica, Vermont where he acquired a home. He was drawn to the rugged winters there. These winter scenes were where Hibbard excelled as an artist and they garnered him many awards throughout his career.
In 1925, He married Winifred Jackman, a former student. The two purchased a home in Rockport. This home served as Hibbard’s gallery and studio until his death in 1972.
(Armand Cabrera at artandinfluence.blogspot.com)


Winhall River Valley, Vermont
Oil on Board, ca. 1925
From clarkegalleries.com


Loading On
Oil on Canvas, ca. 1925-28
From clarkegalleries.com


Sugar House
Oil on Canvas
From clarkegalleries.com


New England Winter Landscape
Oil on Canvas
From clarkegalleries.com


Farm House in Winter
Oil on Canvas
From clarkegalleries.com


Golden Glow
Oil on Canvas, ca. 1928
From clarkegalleries.com


February Orchard
Oil on Canvas on Board
From clarkegalleries.com


Winter Stream
Oil on Canvas
From clarkegalleries.com


The Red House in Winter, Vermont
Oil on canvas
Property of Edwin Lluberes, Elmhurst, New York
From barridoff.swb-consulting.com


Hibbard discovered the state of Vermont When he was a young man, and his subject matter never strayed far from winter scenes for the next half century. Much of his work depicts Vermont's covered bridges, ox teams, sugar houses and towns tucked down in snowy mountains. Hibbard consistently drew inspiration from winter landscapes--boats abandoned on the shoreline and waiting for the spring thaw, people bundled in wool and cutting ice from a frozen river.
(clarkegalleries.com)
Aldro Hibbard is also known for landscape paintings done around his home in Rockford, Massachusetts, along the New England coastline, and in the Canadian Rockies. He produced a large body of work during a long career, much of it concerned with sensitivity to light and shadow. He spent every winter in that state, painting in the area around the West River Valley. He returned every spring to his studio in Rockport with a car crammed with canvases, many of them painted on doors in the middle of winter and in the Canadian Rockies. He produced a large body of work during a long career, much of it concerned with sensitivity to light and shadow.
(clarkegalleries.com)


Light Across the Valley
Oil on Canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Light Across the Valley (framed)
Oil on Canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Winter in Vermont
Oil on Canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Winter in Vermont (framed)
Oil on Canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


South Woods, Rockport
Oil on Canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


South Woods, Rockport
Oil on Canvas
From mcdougallfinearts.com


Over the course of his long career, Hibbard created an impressive body of work featuring landscapes, seascapes, and snow scenes. Rendered in a lively, Impressionist style, Hibbard’s paintings are structured by his deep-seated interest in the interplay of light and shadow, which he translated through vivid texture and animated brushwork. Before Hibbard’s death in 1972, his biographer, John L. Cooley, described the picturesque beauty that Hibbard mined from the American landscape:
Many of his pictures record vanished Americana. His rich laboratory is Nature, and he has painted her, not photographically but as she spoke to him…Beauty—realistic beauty—has been Hibbard’s creed, although Yankee-like, he hesitated to proclaim it.
What Cooley illuminates is the synthesis of observation and idealization that informed Hibbard’s work. Despite their dazzling surfaces, Hibbard’s paintings were firmly rooted in his experience of the natural world. Hibbard drew inspiration directly from nature, moving throughout New England to continually refresh his visual inventory.
Hibbard exhibited at Legendsea Studios, his gallery in Rockport, as well as the Corcoran Gallery Biennial, the Boston Art Club, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the American Artists Professional League. He received several honors during his lifetime, including the Hallgarten Prize from the National Academy of Design, which later named him an Academician, and gold medals from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the American Artists Professional League. Today, his work can be found in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Art, Boston, and the National Gallery of Art.
(Aldro Thompson Hibbard (1886-1972) at questroyalfineart.com)



Tuesday, July 20, 2010

GOLDEN STEPS TO RESPECTABILITY, USEFULNESS, AND HAPPINESS



The youthful live much in the future. They are fond of gazing into its unknown depths, and of endeavoring to trace the outline, at least, of the fortunes that await them. With ardent hope, with eager expectation, they anticipate the approach of coming years—confident they will bring to them naught but unalloyed felicity.
To a young man, a good character is the best capital he can possess, to start with in life. It is much better, and far more to be depended on than gold. Although money may aid in establishing a young man in business, under favorable circumstances, yet without a good character he cannot succeed. His want of reputation will undermine the best advantages, and failure, and ruin, will, sooner or later, overtake him with unerring certainty!!
When it is known that a young man is well-informed, industrious, attentive to business, economical, strictly temperate, and moral…..he cannot fail to obtain the good opinion and the confidence of the whole community. He will have friends on every hand, who will take pleasure in encouraging and assisting him. The wise and good will bestow their commendation upon him; and parents will point to him as an example for their children to imitate. Blessed with health, such a youth cannot fail of success and permanent happiness.
But let it be known that a young man is ignorant or indolent, that he is neglectful of business, or dishonest; that he is given to intemperance, or disposed to visit places of dissipation, or to associate with vicious companions—and what are his prospects? With either one or more of these evil qualifications fixed upon him, he is hedged out of the path of prosperity. To cover up such characteristics for a great length of time, is a moral impossibility.
If a good character, a spotless reputation, is all-essential to the prosperity of a young man, what must it not be to a young woman? A well-established character for morality and virtue is of great importance to people of every class, and in all circumstances. But to a young lady, a "good name" is a priceless jewel. It is everything—literally, EVERYTHING—to her. It will give her an attraction, a value, an importance, in the estimation of others, which nothing else can impart. In possession of a spotless character, she may reasonably hope for peace and happiness. But without such a character, she is nothing! Youth, beauty, dress, accomplishments, all gifts and qualities will be looked upon as naught, when tainted by a suspicious reputation! Nothing can atone for this, nothing can be allowed to take its place, and nothing can give charm and attraction where it exists. When the character of a young woman is gone—all is gone! Thenceforward she can look for naught else but degradation and wretchedness.
Young women frequently err in their understanding of what it is that gives them a good name, and impart their chief attraction. Many seem to imagine that good looks, gay attire, in the extreme of fashion, and a few showy attainments, constitute everything essential to make them interesting and attractive, and to establish a high reputation in the estimation of the other sex. Hence they seek for no other attainments. In this, they make a radical mistake. The charms contained in these qualities, are very shallow, very worthless, and very uncertain.
It is one thing not to have a bad reputation, but quite another thing to have a good one. The fact that an individual does nothing criminal, or offensive, although creditable in itself considered, does not bestow the amount of merit after which all should seek. They may do nothing particularly bad, and nothing very good. It is meritorious to refrain from evil; but it is better still to achieve something by active exertion, which shall deserve commendation. The Apostle exhorts us not only to "cease to do evil," but to "learn to do well." The young, while striving to avoid the evils of a bad reputation, should assiduously seek for the advantages of a good one.
A young man may, in early life, fall into vicious habits, and afterwards turn from them. Some have done so. But they declare that the struggles they were compelled to make—the conflicts and trials, the buffeting of evil passions, and the mental agony they endured, in breaking away, were terrible beyond description. Where one, who has fallen into bad habits in youth, has afterwards abandoned them, there are a score who have continued their victims, until ruin, and a premature death, closed their career. How much safer, how much easier and pleasanter, how much more promising and hopeful, to commence life with good habits well established, with high principles, sound maxims, enlightened rules of conduct, deeply fixed in the soul.
This predisposition of the young to imitate the characteristics of those with whom they associate, has been so well and so long known, that it has given rise to the old proverb—"Show me your company, and I will show you your character." So perfectly did Solomon understand this, that he uttered the wise maxim—"Make no friendship with an angry man; and with a furious man thou shalt not go; lest thou learn his ways, and get a snare to thy soul."
The young should remember, that people will judge them by the company they keep. This principle is perfectly correct. In selecting their associates, they act voluntarily. They choose such as they please. When they seek the society of the ignorant, the vulgar, the profane and profligate, they give the best of reasons for believing that they prefer profligacy and vulgarity to virtue and purity. To what other conclusion can the observer come? If they preferred virtue and purity, they would certainly seek pure and virtuous associates. Hence society has adopted the very correct principle of judging the young, by the character of their associates.
(Adapted from The Project Gutenberg eBook, Golden Steps to Respectability, Usefulness and Happiness, by John Mather Austin)


Monday, July 19, 2010

THE STORY OF A MAN WHO WAS TOO PROUD TO RUN



High Noon on main street
From Madrid Miner's photostream at flickr.com


High Noon (1952) is possibly the all-time best Western film ever made - a successful box-office production by Stanley Kramer and director Fred Zinnemann [who also directed From Here to Eternity (1953) and A Man For All Seasons (1966)]. The Western genre was employed to tell an uncharacteristic social problem tale about civic responsibility, without much of the typical frontier violence, panoramic landscapes, or tribes of marauding Indians.
One of the film posters described the theme of the deserted, lone marshal who stubbornly insisted on delaying his newly-married life with a pacifist Quaker wife (symbolic of US isolationists) in order to stay and confront his former nemesis and paroled murderer - Frank Miller: The story of a man who was too proud to run.
The dramatic, tightly-compressed, austere black and white film with high-contrast images was shot in a spare 31 days, and the physically-pained, ravaged look etched on 51 year old Gary Cooper's gaunt face was due to actual illness (a recurring hip problem, bleeding stomach ulcers, and lower back pain), and emotional stress due to his recent breakup with actress Patricia Neal after a three-year, well-publicized affair while separated from his wife. The time span of the film (about 105 minutes) approximates the actual screen length of the film - 85 minutes - accentuated by frequent images of the clock as time rapidly dissipates before the final showdown. Cameraman Floyd Crosby's years of filming New Deal documentaries is evident in the film's sparseness, static compositions, and authentic feel.
This simple, stark, low-budget Western classic, with a total budget of $750,000, was nominated for seven Academy Awards including Best Picture (won by Cecil B. DeMille's circus epic The Greatest Show on Earth (1952)), Best Director, and Best Screenplay - it was awarded four awards: Best Song for "High Noon (Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin')" (sung by Tex Ritter throughout the film, lyrics by Ned Washington, music by Dimitri Tiomkin), Best Scoring of a Dramatic Picture (Dimitri Tiomkin), Best Film Editing (Elmo Williams and Harry Gerstad), and Best Actor for Gary Cooper's performance - his second Oscar after a win for Sergeant York (1941). (Cooper's win was an unusual honor, since Western films (and acting roles) are rare nominees and winners in Academy history! The film's theme song was made a popular hit by Western singer Frankie Laine.) Presumably, the Academy felt obligated to honor one of filmdom's greatest directors (DeMille) with the Best Picture Oscar, as his career was coming to an end.
(High Noon (1952) , review by Tim Dirks at filmsite.org)


Grace Kelly
From doctormacro1.info


Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly
as newlyweds Will and Amy Kane
From movie...ine.co.uk


Directed by Fred Zinnemann, High Noon stars Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly as newlyweds Will and Amy Kane. Will has recently decided to retire as the marshal of Hadleyville, a small town in New Mexico. When Kane learns that Frank Miller (Ian MacDonald), a criminal Kane put behind bars, is about to be released from prison, Kane must postpone his new life with his new wife. After all, Miller has already declared revenge on Kane when the clock hits twelve and Kane destroy the whole town to get to him. To protect the town, Kane sticks around to stand his ground. The town isn’t as courageous as Kane though, and he has a hard time trying to find people to get his back.
Soon Frank hops on the train headed toward Hadleyville with three of his gang members. Time keeps ticking and everyone has an excuse not to help Kanel. Amy, who just wants to leave town, threatens to leave Kane if he doesn’t come with. Unlike her new husband, she doesn’t believe in violence and wants no part of it. As the clock strikes high noon, Kane must face off alone with one of the most dangerous criminals in the west. Cue the slow cowboy music and release the tumbleweeds. This shootout is history in the making.
Written by Carl Foreman, this film does an excellent job of balancing the action. Unlike many westerns (cough cough Once Upon a Time in the West), this film doesn’t dwell on the slow paced aspects of the west commonly portrayed in westerns. They are in there, but certainly do not bore their audience to death. It’s hard to be bored when the anticipation of the inevitable event is very present. Intercutting images of the clock ticking away, adds a great sense of urgency. The script makes us feel just as anxious and worried as Kane does.
(Grace Kelly tries to calm Gary Cooper at 'High Noon' by Pamela Miller, at examiner.com)


Amy, who just wants to leave town
From movie...ine.co.uk


After fleeing on impulse upon the urging of his friends, Kane decides to turn around and face Frank and his men. This despite the earnest insistence of his wife, who happens to be a Quaker and is therefore the ultimate pacifist. But nothing can deter him, not even her threat to leave on the noon train if he stays to fight. And why does he want to stay? The film's tagline is misleading: Kane does not stay because he is too proud to run. There is nothing about pride here, he stays because he feels it his duty to.
As a marshall, he has sworn an oath to protect the town and its people. We are told that before he came, Frank used to lord it over Hadleyville, harassing women, cowing men into submission, and so on. But Kane put an end to that... until now. The town's problem is his problem, and even though there is an easy way out for him, he knows very well what Frank's return would mean to the townsfolk he's supposed to protect. Never mind that officially he is no longer in charge of their safety: the law does not reside in a badge.
[‘High Noon (1952)’ by Fred Zinnemann, November 18, 2004 at gotterdammerung.org]


There is no help at the saloon
From movie...ine.co.uk


But where does law reside? Very quickly Kane finds out just why Frank was able to terrorize an entire town in the past. Nobody is willing to stand beside him and fight. Everyone has good reasons not to. This one has children, that one's career ambition has been thwarted; this one is a neglected ex-lover, that one does not want to die; this one is worried about the town's future, that one has arthritis and cannot shoot. The town is full of cowards, all with persuasive excuses to do nothing. There is no help at the saloon (where some are Frank's buddies), at the Church (where the Preacher blasts Kane for not attending regularly), at his friend's house (where the guy has his wife tell a bald-faced lie), or at his mentor's, the old marshall (where the cynic advises Kane that people have to think carefully before they act and that deep in their hearts they don't respect the law).
As the minutes trickle by, Kane realizes that he has been abandoned. No match for Frank and his men, out-gunned, but with resolve bordering on acceptance of his inevitable fate, he sits down to pen his last will and testament. The ink is not yet dry when the horn announces the arrival of the noon train. One of the most poignant scenes has Kane walk out in the deserted street, clearly afraid of the impending encounter, not knowing what to do with his hands, then slowly marching toward the coming bandits as the wind sweeps the barren landscape.
[‘High Noon (1952)’ by Fred Zinnemann, November 18, 2004 at gotterdammerung.org]


Will Kane
From Folsom Prison Blues' photostream


The bandits
From movie...ine.co.uk


The film has an enviable reputation but not without attendant controversy. It is Bill Clinton's favorite (he reportedly saw it 17 times while at the White House, a record for the place even though each President has seen, and liked, it, with Ike even shouting advice to Kane), and it ranks high on National Review's list of great conservative films. It seems to embody the quintessential American virtue: standing tall and alone for right when everyone else runs for cover. (Parallels with current political situation on the international scene are easy to make.).....
[‘High Noon (1952)’ by Fred Zinnemann, November 18, 2004 at gotterdammerung.org]


Will and Amy Kane
From movie...ine.co.uk


The shootout
From movie...ine.co.uk


The shootout
From movie...ine.co.uk


Standing tall and alone
From drmvm1's photostream at flickr.com


In the end, Amy's decision is guided by love (as the title ballad tells it, love shall overcome). It is not a repudiation of her pacifist ways---because one cannot honestly claim that she accepts that sometimes using violence can be moral---and it makes her a very traditional woman indeed: one who is prepared to sacrifice it all for her man.
The final scene in the film has Kane drop his badge in disgust as the townspeople flock around him in disbelief about their miraculous rescue. Having discharged his duty toward people who are not worthy of his life, Kane leaves and no one picks up the star from the dust. One has to wonder whether he has made a difference. After all, there will be other Franks and there may be no other Kane in their future.
[‘High Noon (1952)’ by Fred Zinnemann, November 18, 2004 at gotterdammerung.org]



By TheWesternReview at youtube.com



By gosinka555 at youtube.com