Tuesday, January 4, 2011

BROWN COUNTY ART COLONY




Theodore Clement Steele
From artcyclopedia.org


Theodore Clement Steele
From in.gov

Theodore Clement Steele
From indianahistory.org
Theodore Clement Steele was born in Owen County, Indiana, on 11 September 1847, the son of Samuel Hamilton Steele and Harriett Newell Evans Steele. Five years later the family moved to Waveland, southwest of Crawfordsville. There Steele attended school, and graduated from Waveland Collegiate Institute in 1868. He began painting at an early age, and is said to have been giving instruction when he was only thirteen. In the years 1868-1870 he began painting for a living. He specialized in portraits, and received some instruction in Cincinnati and Chicago.
In 1870 Steele moved to Indianapolis. In the same year he married Mary Elizabeth Lakin. She was born in 1850 near Rushville, the daughter of Adam Simmons Lakin and Mary Cloud Matson. After her mother's death in 1862, she had gone to school in Waveland while her father ran a sawmill in Kansas. The marriage took place near Rushville at the home of an uncle.
For two years after their marriage, the Steeles lived in Battle Creek, Michigan, while he fulfilled a number of portrait commissions. In 1873 they returned to Indianapolis, where he set up a studio. They lived in a number of places. The longest stay was in an apartment in the Bradshaw Block on Washington Street, where they became friends with the Lockridge family. Steele's work enlisted the interest of his cousin William Richards and of Herman Lieber. With their help a plan was formulated to enable Steele to study in Munich, where many local artists had already gone, including William Merritt Chase and Frank Duveneck. Shares of $100 were subscribed by Lieber, Richards, several members of the Fletcher family, and others. This raised a total of $1300, which enabled the Steele family, which by now included three children, to stay in Munich from 1880 to 1885. In return, Steele was to send back copies of paintings in the Munich galleries and work of his own. J. Ottis Adams and William Forsyth were among other Indiana artists who came to Munich at the same time.
During their stay in Germany, the Steeles lived first in Munich and then in the nearby village of Schleissheim. Steele studied drawing and painting at the Royal Academy under Professors Benczur and Loefftz. He also worked on his own at landscape painting, receiving helpful criticism from Frank Currier and other colleagues. Meanwhile Mrs. Steele took care of the house and of the children, Brandt, Margaret (Daisy), and Shirley (Ted).
(indianahistory.org)


Winter Afternoon - Old Munich
Oil on canvas, 1883
Private collection
From anna-warvick.livejournal.com


Haying Scene
Oil on canvas, 1884
Public collection
From artmight.com


Canal, Schlessheim
Oil on canvas, 1884
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


In 1885 the Steele family returned to Indianapolis. They moved into the Tinker place at the northeast corner of 7th (now 16th) and Pennsylvania Streets, and in the following year built a separate studio. The family lived there at "Talbott Place" until 1901, when the property was purchased for the John Herron Art Museum. Steele gave instruction in art. In 1885 he started a school in cooperation with Sue Ketcham.
(indianahistory.org)


On the Muscatatuck
Oil on canvas, 1886
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Pleasant Run
Oil on canvas, 1887
Public collection
From artmight.com


Meridian Street Thawing Weather
Oil on canvas, 1887
Public collection
From artmight.com


A Bleak day
Oil on canvas, 1888
Indiana University Art Museum (USA)
From ARC at artrenewal.org


The Brook in the Woods
Oil on canvas, 1889
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


An Indiana Road
Oil on canvas, 1889
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org

Theodore Clement Steele
From depauw.edu
T.C. Steele had a lifelong love affair with the Indiana landscape, but the timeless universality of his picture making provides his depictions of the Midwestern landscape and cityscape with a welcoming familiarity that appeals to all lovers of art and nature.
A member of the Hoosier School, which included fellow Munich-trained Indiana artists William Forsyth and John Ottis Adams, Steele promoted and sponsored Midwestern art as a founder and director of the Indiana School of Art and founding member of the Society of Western Artists, as associate member of the National Academy of Design, and as a jury member for selections and awards for three world’s fair art exhibitions. He received an honorary doctorate from Indiana University, Bloomington, where he also served as artist-in-residence.
(emuseum.org)
Named in the 1890s by a Chicago writer, the Hoosier Group painters each sought training abroad, eventually settling in Indiana to focus on the local landscape and places visited in their travels. Often working together, they developed a style based on loose, textural paint application and harmonious colors.
John Ottis Adams, William Forsyth, Theodore Clement Steele, and Otto Stark are among the Hoosier Group artists represented in the Ball State University Museum of Art's collection.
(bsu.edu)


Tinker Place
Oil on canvas, 1891
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


The Ohio River from the College Campus Honover
Oil on canvas, 1892
Public collection
From artmight.com


September
Oil on canvas, 1892
Public collection
From artmight.com


In the berry field
Oil on canvas, 1892
Public collection
From artmight.com


November Harmony
Oil on canvas, 1893
Public collection
From artmight.com


At Noon Day
Oil on canvas, 1894
H. Vance Swope Art Gallery (USA)
From ARC at artrenewal.org


In the Whitewater Valley near Metamora
Oil on canvas, 1894
Richmond Art Museum (USA)
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Mysterious
Oil on canvas, 1895
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Cows by the Stream
Oil on canvas, 1895
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org

T.C. and Selma Steele
From ourbrowncounty.com
In the 1890s, Steele became a nationally recognized painter, but this success was bittersweet due to his beloved wife’s death in 1895. After Mary’s death, he decided to focus on painting landscapes, something his wife had always encouraged him to do. Steele purchased 200 heavily wooded acres in Brown County, married Selma Neubacher, the assistant superintendent of art in the Indianapolis school system, and settled into “The House of the Singing Winds” to paint the hilly landscapes of this rural area near Bloomington.
(indianahistory.org)
When Theodore Clement Steele decided in 1907 to settle in Brown County, he sought inspirational subject matter for the landscape painting that was his first love. Other artists followed and soon Brown County was home to a bustling art colony that rivaled any the east or west coast offered.
Hundreds of artists in the years since have found the same inspiration in the rugged Brown County hills—and inspiration as well, in the home that Steele and his wife, Selma, created for themselves. After Steele’s death in 1926, his widow remained in their Brown County home. A few months before her own death in 1945, Mrs. Steele transferred the property—land, buildings, furnishings and artwork—to the people of the state of Indiana with the wish that it become a “sanctuary of the spirit” for all who love natural beauty and beauty created by man. Today, Steele’s “House of the Singing Winds” is part of the T.C. Steele State Historic Site and attracts thousands of art lovers each year. Visitors can enjoy Steele’s paintings displayed in his studio and home. Artists are encouraged to set up their easels to capture the property’s special beauties, either individually or at the two annual “paintouts” held in the spring and fall…..
(T.C. and Selma Steele: the Art of Landscape, by Andrea deTarnowsky Historic Site Manager, T.C. Steele State Historic Site at ourbrowncounty.com)


Gordon Hill
Oil on canvas, 1897
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Talbott Place
Oil on canvas, 1897
Private collection
Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites (United States)
From artmight.com


The Muscatatuck
Oil on canvas, 1898
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Brookville
Oil on canvas, 1898
Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites (Indiana, USA)
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Tennessee Scene
Oil on canvas, 1899
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Roan Mountain
Oil on canvas, 1899
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Cumberland Mountains
Oil on canvas, 1899
Public collection
From artmight.com


Creek in Winter
Oil on canvas, 1899
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


The Grist Mill
Oil on canvas, 1901
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


On the Oregon Coast
Oil on canvas, 1902
Public collection
From artmight.com


Puget Sound
Oil on canvas, 1903
Public collection
From artmight.com


Whitewater River
Oil on canvas, 1904
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


November Morning
Oil on canvas, 1904
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Along the Creek
Oil on canvas, 1905
Public collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Brown County
Oil on canvas, 1916
Private collection
From the-athenaeum.org


Adolph Shulz is considered to be the founder of the Brown County Art Colony. He began visiting Brown County in 1908 and in 1917 became a permanent resident. Both Adolph Shulz and T.C. Steele influenced other artists and many began building cabins and moving to the area. Will Vawter and Gustave Baumann were among the first to make Brown County their home. Other artists such as Charles Dahlgreen, Lucie Hartrath, and L.O. Griffith came from Chicago and by the early 1930s there were at least eighteen artists with permanent homes in Brown County. Artists such as C. Curry Bohm, Edward K. Williams, Ada Walter Shulz, Carl Graf, V.J. Cariani, Gustav Baumann, Will Vawter, Dale Bessire, Georges LaChance, Marie Goth, Leota Loop, Adam Emory Albright, Olive Rush, and Alexis Fournier flourished and created the Brown County Art Colony nearly more than 100 years ago.
For the purpose of studying Steele’s work, his paintings can be categorized into three main time periods, including the Munich period (1880 – 1885); Brookville period (1898 – 1906) and Brown County period (1907 – 1926). During the time between Munich and Brookville, Steele painted near Indianapolis or on sojourns to Vernon, Yountsville, Spencer and Metamora. He also painted in Vermont (1887), Tennessee (1899), and Oregon and California (1902 and 1903).
(in.gov)


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