Tuesday, January 25, 2011

COLORFUL, ROMANTIC ITALIAN VIEWS



Franz Richard Unterberger was born in Innsbruck, in what was then the Austro-Hungarian Empire, on 15th August 1838, one of eleven children of a wealthy bourgeois family. He decided to pursue a career as an artist at a relatively young age and enrolled in the Academy in Munich. Here he studied with Albert Zimmerman (1808-1888) a professor and landscape painter at the Academy and with Julius Lange (1817-1878). It was as a painter of Alpine landscapes that Unterberger first drew recognition, views particularly set in his native Tyrol. In 1860 Unterberger continued his studies in Düsseldorf; in what was to be a particularly significant period. He was much taken by the work of Oswald Aschenbach (1827-1905) a landscape painter and his brother Andreas (1815-1910) also a landscape painter who worked extensively in Scandinavia before moving to Italy in the 1870’s.
(macconnal-mason.com)


The view from the Balcony
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Amalfi
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Amalfi, Golfe de Salerne
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Amalfi, The Gulf Of Salerno
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


The Amalfi Coast
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Rio St. Barnaba, Venice
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Rio Santa Barnaba, Venice
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Canale Della Giudecca
From onework.ru


Düsseldorf was the favoured academy for Scandinavian painters studying abroad and as a result of this northern influence Unterberger was drawn to Scandinavia where in the early 1860’s he produced a number of atmospheric mountainous scenes. Following this period Unterberger moved to Brussels, largely since he believed the art market there was likely to be more lucrative, he was to live and work there periodically for most of his life, though never acquiring a property or citizenship. Unterberger was becoming a truly European artist, in the 1860’s painting from Norway to Sicily. By the 1870’s he was exhibiting throughout Europe, Hamburg, Antwerp, Brussels, Berlin, Stuttgart, Paris, Munich, Vienna and in addition Philadelphia and Boston. He was now painting panoramic Italian scenes, coastal landscapes set in Southern Italy, Capri, Naples, Amalfi, Sorrento, Palermo and views set in Venice. His works suffused with a warm Mediterranean light and a shimmering silvery tone.
(macconnal-mason.com)


The Bay of Naples
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


The Bay of Naples
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Unterberger settled in Brussels in 1864, where he spent the rest of his life. During this period, he usually spent summers at Neuilly-sur-Seine (outside of Paris), and from there he often visited Sicily and southern Italy, notedly Naples (above) and its environs where he painted some of his best pictures. Unterberger also traveled along the coast of England and Scotland. These trips provided inspiration for many of the artist’s finest paintings. He also found great success in Vienna, where he exhibited and received several medals, including the Order of Francis Joseph.
(andersongalleries.com)


A View of Posilippo, Naples
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Posillipo (above) is a residential quarter of Naples, called Pusilleco in the Neapolitan language. The ancient Greeks first named this rocky, wooded region at the western end of the Bay of Naples Pausylipon, meaning “respite from worry.” The area remained largely undeveloped until a road, via Posillipo, was completed in 1824.
Unterberger portrays the quaint architectural setting of this Neapolitan town, as well as the landscape beyond it. He depicts the shoreline of the Bay of Naples with Mount Vesuvius looming in the distance. This infamous volcano responsible for the destruction of Pompeii in 79 AD was still active during the 19th century; therefore the artist represents Vesuvius billowing smoke. In the foreground, a group of peasants are at rest, dressed in the traditional costume of the period. A large fishing net is draped over railing, indicating the livelihood of some of the inhabitants of Posillopo. In the background, more peasants gather near the entryway of a humble residence.
(andersongalleries.com)
Unterberger was a romantic style painter of landscapes, genre, architectures, and water scenes. He is best known for his scenic paintings Italy, which feature intimate views as well as large vistas of the country’s iconic cities. Unterberger’s romantic atmospheric style of painting remains very popular and his works can be found in important private and museum collections throughout America and Europe.
(andersongalleries.com)
In 1883 Unterberger exhibited in Venezuela and the following year in London at the International Universal Exhibition, in the Austrian section. He was an artist with a huge International following. Southern Italian and Venetian scenes formed the majority of his output in the 1890’s. In his later years Unterberger moved to a studio in Neuilly-sur-Seine where he died 25th May 1902.
His works can be found in museums in: Amalfi; Louviers; Melbourne; Troyes and Venice.
(macconnal-mason.com)

Franz Richard Unterberger Bio:
• 1838 Born to the son of an art dealer in Innsbruck, Austria on August 15th
• 1853 First studied at the Munich Academy with Clemens von Zimmermann and Julius Lange and continued training at the Weimar Academy under Albert Zimmermann
• 1859 After a visit to Milan, returned to Munich due to the unsettled political situation
• 1859 Enrolled at Dusseldorf Academy where he joined the Achenbach brothers, who became famous for their landscapes
• 1864 Visited and painted in Norway and Belgium before settling in Brussels; continued to travel in Italy, England, and Scotland and even exhibited in Vienna where he received several medals including the Order of Francis Joseph
• 1902 Died
(inartshow.com)


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