Saturday, March 19, 2011

SERENE TRANQUILITY AND TIMELESS BEAUTY



Barbizon landscapes are characterized by their realism and tranquil, meditative attitude toward nature. Barbizon, a village on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest to the south of Paris, was the hub for a group of painters active around the middle of the nineteenth century. This generation formed a bridge between the academic salon painters of the first quarter of the century and the impressionists, who came onto the scene in 1870s. In their day, the Barbizon painters-among them Rousseau, Daubigny, Corot, Millet, Dupr, Millet, Diaz, Troyon, and others-were considered revolutionary, preferring to paint outdoors "en plein air" rather than in studios and elevating landscape itself to a respectable place in the hierarchy of approved subjects.
(Art in the Afternoon, L.L.C. at artin...rnoon.net)
Hippolyte Camille Delpy, an important nineteenth century French landscape painter, was born in Joigny in 1842. He is best known today for beautifully composed landscapes executed in the style of the Barbizon School.
(Art in the Afternoon, L.L.C. at artin...rnoon.net)


La grande rue à Auvers-sur-oise
From auvers-sur-oise.eu


Washerwomen In A River Landscape
From topart168.com


Twilight
Oil on Canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Bord De L'Oise
By the Banks of l'Oise
Oil on panel
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Lavandiere Pres D'Un Groupe De Maisons
Washerwomen near a Group of Houses
Oil on panel
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


The impressionists followed the lead of the Barbizon painters, breaking entirely with the academic tradition: sketching outdoors, seeking new subjects, using much brighter colors, and freeing up their brush strokes. But some of these tendencies were already present in the second generation of Barbizon painters, to which Delpy belongs. In fact, Delpy can be considered a transitional figure. He studied with Daubigny and Corot and remained close to them all his life, but he also befriended Pissarro and Cezanne and in return was encouraged by them to add richer colors to his palette.
(Art in the Afternoon, L.L.C. at artin...rnoon.net)


A River Landscape
From alazraki.com


A River Landscape, above, is an expansive landscape in which grassy banks flow gently into the edges of the river. To the left, a tree’s long feathery branches stretch up into the pink sky, offering shelter to the three female figures washing clothes in the water. The time is late afternoon or early evening, a fact indicated by the quality of light found in the sky, and by the long shadows cast across the calm river waters. The billowy clouds unfurl across the horizon line, framed by the pink and yellow tinged sky. Delpy’s gift for the relation of natural beauty is quaintly exemplified here. The artist deftly portrays the brilliant, yet subtle, interplay of colors found at sunset: a palette infused with purple, yellow, blue, green and brown. Simultaneously, he skillfully achieves a harmony of shapes, and patterns of light and shadow that visually anchor the painting for the viewer. But the painting’s exemplification of technical mastery is hardly the main thing one notices in viewing our landscape. As one’s eye travels from the cottony lavender clouds to the birds dipping near the water’s surface, the luminous colors melt into a place of serene tranquility and timeless beauty.
(alazraki.com)


Le Rivierea pont sur Yvonne
PROVENANCE Rehs Galleries, Inc., New York
Private Collection, California
From REHS GALLERIES, INC. at fada.com


Apart from being accepted for the first time at the Salon, the year 1869 was marked by extensive traveling for Delpy, a pattern that had been established early on and one that would remain a consistent characteristic of his life. He divided his time between his two masters, earlier in the year joining Corot in Ville d’Avray and later returning to the company of Daubigny at Auvers, where he met several other artists, including his future father-in-law, Aman Cyboulle, a flower painter. Interspersed between these periods studying the landscape, he managed to return to Joigny to spend time with his family. Though his first Salon entry, Un Déjeuner de Carême, chez mon père (A Luncheon during Lent, at my father’s house), a still life, his experience in Corot’s studio and alongside Daubigny painting en plein air, the young artist had begun on his path to artistic success. His 1869 debut would begin a career at the Salon that spanned over 40 years.
Over the course of the next year and into 1871, France was engaged in the Franco-Prussian war, which halted the Salon of 1871. When the Salon was reinstated the following year, 1872, artists were faced with an increasingly severe jury which refused almost 4,000 paintings, including Delpy’s. Presented with increasing obstacles, several artists banded together and petitioned the President of the Republic for permission to open a Salon of their own for the artists who were not permitted entry into the official Salon, and also protesting that not one landscape artist was part of the Salon jury. The letter was signed by such influential names as Daubigny, Corot, Honoré Daumier, Theodore Frère, and Edouard Manet. Delpy was also among the protesters. Though this Salon did not take place for financial reasons, the first Salon des Refusés did take place in 1873, though Delpy, incensed by the previous loss, did not take part. Hardly an overly combative person, however, Delpy’s disposition was described in only the best terms (quoted in Michèle Lannoy-Duputel’s Hippolyte-Camille Delpy, 1842-1910: Invitation au Voyage, Paris: Léopold d’Or, 1989, pg. 59):
The saddest face would leave this studio happy; here one can work and laugh at the same time. This convivial artist with a warm face is both hospitable and frank; he does not pretend to be an art pundit as he is not yet a pundit of art; at the same time he works and occasionally tells a bawdy joke.
(REHS GALLERIES, INC. at fada.com)


Cirque dHiver
Oil on Canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


CircoMedranoc
From aloj.us.es


His Salon paintings of 1873 and 1874 were well received. In 1875, exhibited a snow scene at the Salon for the first time and was complemented by the critic Jules Castagnary for his originality.
In 1876 Delpy organized a sale of his own paintings at the Hôtel Drouot, an unusual undertaking. The sale was favorably announced in several newspapers and was a significant success, with all 45 works sold. That summer, Delpy moved his family to Bois-le-Roi outside the Forest of Fontainebleau.
At the Salon of 1880, Delpy exhibited a potato harvesting scene, his first landscape with large-scale figures. Throughout the 1880s, Delpy alternated work on the Normandy coast with stays in the Forest of Fontainebleau and in Paris. Delpy received his first Salon medal in 1884.
(en.wikipedia.org)


La Chaumiere A Berneval
Thatched Cottage in Berneval
Oil on Canvas, 1885
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


In 1886, Delpy traveled to the United States as part of a team that painted a panorama of the battle of Manassas (American Civil War) in Washington DC. At the Exposition Universelle of 1889, Delpy was awarded an honorable mention. The Galerie Georges Petit, a leading dealer in contemporary French paintings, began to handle his work and subsequently organized several one-man exhibitions of Delpy's paintings.
Petit was simultaneously promoting Pissarro and Alfred Sisley and would later show Monet. In 1908, Delpy was given an exhibition at the prestigious Grafton Galleries in London.
Delpy died in June 4, 1910.
(en.wikipedia.org)


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