Monday, May 23, 2011

THE FATHER OF THE MODERN MOVIE POSTER




Richard Amsel
From adammcdaniel.com


Movie Posters of Richard Amsel
From conceptart.org


The early 1970s witnessed a keen interest in nostalgia. A war was raging in Southeast Asia, and people, possibly yearning for a simpler, more innocent time, rediscovered their show-business past. Old records, old movies, old stage shows were dusted off and reissued, remade or revived -- often with Richard Amsel providing the artwork.
("Portraits in Stardust: The Art of Richard Amsel" at lucyfan.com)



Hello Dolly Original Art, 1969
Lace, colored paper collage
Pencil, pen and ink and watercolor
From adammcdaniel.com


The finished poster
From adammcdaniel.com


Richard Amsel studied at at the Philadelphia College of Art, and "exploded" onto the New York art scene in 1970 after creating the poster art for Barbra Steisand's film version of "Hello, Dolly."
("Portraits in Stardust: The Art of Richard Amsel" at lucyfan.com)


Chinatown
From americanartarchives.com


The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972)
Directed by: John Huston
From impawards.com


Murder on the Orient Express
From americanartarchives.com


The Sting (1973)
Directed by: George Roy Hill
Poster artwork by Richard Amsel
Poster design by Bill Gold
From impawards.com


The Shootist (1976)
Directed by: Don Siegel
From impawards.com


Richard Amsel (December, 1947 – November 17, 1985) was an American illustrator and graphic designer. His movie posters commissions included some of the most important and popular films of the 1970s including The Champ, Chinatown, Julia, The Last Picture Show, The Last Tycoon, The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, The Muppet Movie, Murder on the Orient Express, Nashville, Papillon, The Shootist, and The Sting. (The latter's poster design paid homage to the painting style of J.C. Leyendecker, evoking both his "Arrow Collar Man" and his covers for The Saturday Evening Post.)
(en.wikipedia.org)


Lily Tomlin
From scrubbles.net


Though brief, Amsel's career was prolific. By the decade's end his movie posters alone matched or exceeded the creative output of many of his contemporaries. His work graced the cover of Time—a portrait of comedienne Lily Tomlin, now housed in the permanent collection at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. In keeping with the magazine's stringent deadlines, Amsel's illustration was created in only two or three days.
(en.wikipedia.org)


Preliminary study for movie poster Nijinsky, 1980
Three heads, surrounded by six dancers
Colored pencil on glassine
From illustrationhouse.com


Nijinsky, 1980
Movie starred Leslie Brown and Alan Bates as Diaghilev
From illustrationhouse.com


Lindsay Wagner as The Bionic Woman
From adammcdaniel.com


RAIDERS of the LOST ARK
From posterwire.com


RAIDERS of the LOST ARK
From blahmovies.files.wordpress.com


Amsel's work, once described as "thoroughly captivating, totally romantic, artful commercial art," combined a unique sense of "now" with a keen fondness for earlier times. As one critic remarked, "Amsel's work usually pays affectionate tribute to the past. His style, however, is timeless and his attractive use of warm, glowing colors adds an even greater 'modernity' to his evocations of times and styles gone by."
"I'm interested in uncovering relationships between the past and the present," Amsel once confessed, "and in discovering how things have changed and grown. I don't see any point in copying the past, but I think the elements of the past can be taken to another realm."
("Portraits in Stardust: The Art of Richard Amsel" at lucyfan.com)


Formerly The Harlettes (1976)
From americanartarchives.com


TV Guide, The Big Three Anchors (1985)
From americanartarchives.com


To mark the acquisition of the more than 500-piece collection of illustrations and sketches of alumnus Richard Amsel, The University of the Arts presented "Richard Amsel: A Retrospective” at its Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery (333 S. Broad St., Philadelphia).
Amsel created some of the most recognizable, iconic show business-related imagery of the late 20th century before he died in 1985. His “AMSEL” signature can be found on posters for more than 30 major motion pictures, close to 40 TV Guide cover illustrations and numerous album covers and concert posters.
A close friend of Amsel’s and the director of Late Night Programming at CBS Television in Los Angeles for 15 years, Dorian Hannaway donated the collection and designated it as a teaching resource for the university.
“I believe University of the Arts students will be inspired by seeing Richard’s original work,” Hannaway said. “My hope is that it will educate future generations of artists. I’m grateful that the university is preserving his art as well as maintaining the legacy of one of its famous alumni.”
(THE UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS at uarts.edu)
"Richard was an amazing person capable of this genius work, who was also this silly and wonderful and shy man," said Dorian Hannaway, "He wasn't ostentatious about his talent, but he was confident."
The portraits pay homage to the nostalgia of old Hollywood, often through the groovy lens of the Age of Aquarius, while still managing to look contemporary by today's standards.
"He was drawing on influences from the past that were timeless. He was influenced by Art Nouveau, Klimt, Mucha, and Walt Disney," said professor Mark Tocchet, the head of the school's illustration department. "He found a way to assimilate it all into his art."
Hannaway, who met Amsel in 1974, said she had the collection of sketches stored under her bed for decades and knew that it would be a valuable teaching tool for art students.
"I never felt it was mine. I always thought it should be preserved," she said. "Now it's been set free, and it's a wonderful feeling."
(Philadelphia exhibit shows Hollywood illustrations By JOANN LOVIGLIO, Associated Press Writer at breitbart.com)


Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome
From sergioleoneifr.blogspot.com


Amsel’s last poster was the one he created for Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome, finished just weeks before his death of AIDS-related complications at the age of 37. Thinking back on the work of Richard Amsel, as well as contemporaries like Bob Peak, is to remember a time when movie one-sheets and poster art, when placed in the hands of men and women like these artists, were more often considered artistic opportunities of their own apart from, but always in graceful support of, the movies themselves. The University of the Arts at Philadelphia’s Richard Amsel collection provided those who appreciate Amsel’s work that chance to see, through his sketches and illustrations, how the artist’s ideas develop, where he intends to take them, and the process of exploration that occurs in each drawing.
(sergioleoneifr.blogspot.com)
Even though Richard Amsel passed away 24 years ago, his artwork is still some of the most recognizable in the world. Fan from every corner of the earth salivate at the sight of some of his more famous work, while others have stood the test of time on their own merit of just being some of the most well-crafted pieces of art out there. One wouldn't expect such attention to be put into a movie poster, but that is exactly what Amsel did. Now, his name is as world-renowned as some of the movies that inspired him.
Like many great artists, Richard Amsel died before his time, but also left a legacy that those in his medium never achieved. His name is forever engrained in the collective minds of the public, maybe without them even knowing it.
(articlesbase.com)


1 comment:

piercepola said...

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