Saturday, June 4, 2011

DECORATIVE IMPRESSIONISM



Decorative Impressionism is an art historical term that is credited to the art writer Christian Brinton, who first used it in 1911. Brinton titled an article on the American expatriate painter Frederick Frieseke, one of the members of the famous Giverny Colony of American Impressionists, "The Decorative Impressionist."
However, use of the term has been revived in recent decades by the influential and prolific art historian William Gerdts to describe the figurative works of not only Frieseke, but some of his Giverny compatriots including Richard E. Miller, Louis Rittman and Robert Reid. The same term has been applied to other Giverny school painters who painted the figure including Guy Rose, Karl Anderson and Karl Albert Buehr.
(en.wikipedia.org)


The garden seat
Fromcocoon.splinder.com


Spring Landscape
From treadwaygallery.com


Strolling Figures in a Landscape
From treadwaygallery.com


Karl Albert Buehr(1848-1919) studied at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1888-1893, and then in Paris in 1901-02. He was not formally associated with the “Frieseke Group”, but he did paint in Giverny at about the same time, and shared a similar aesthetic. In 1914, Buehr returned from a long time spent abroad to teach at the Art Institute of Chicago, and his works of Giverny were exhibited there. He also painted in the Midwest, and exhibited at the St. Louis Expo (1904); Municipal Art League (Chicago); and the Chicago Gallery Association.
(treadwaygallery.com)


The Flower Girl
Painting - oil on canvas
From the-athenaeum.org


A Pledge of Love
Private collection
Painting - oil on canvas
From elle-belle10.livejournal.com


Red-Headed Girl with Parasol
Private collection
Painting - oil on canvas
From the-athenaeum.org


Young Girl Knitting (aka Expectancy)
From elle-belle10.livejournal.com


Born in 1865 in Germany, Karl Albert Buehr was one of seven sons whose family emigrated to America and settled in Chicago in 1869. He began his career while working at a lithographic firm near the Art Institute of Chicago. He took a job in the shipping department and enrolled in night classes at the Institute from 1888-1897, he graduated with honors in 1894. After completing his studies he was invited to stay and teach.
Buehr showed early promise. In 1894 a critic wrote: "Karl Albert Buehr is one of the strongest of the Art Institute’s pupils. His work can safely be placed among the best… and would hold its own in any collection composed of the works of painters of established reputation.
In 1899 he was in Paris with Frank Duveneck, his studies also put him at the Académie Julian with Raphael Collin; 1902 Académie Colarossi;and in 1907-1909 at the London School of Art with Frank Brangwyn.
He spent many summers painting in Giverny. He painted a number of typical Giverny subjects of women in outdoor landscape. In 1928-29, he was a guest artist at Stanford University."
(elle-belle10.livejournal.com)


Young lady with parasol
From cocoon.splinder.com


Buehr remained for some time in Giverny, and here he became well-acquainted with other well known expatriate America impressionists such as Richard Miller, Theodore Earl Butler, Frederick Frieseke, and Lawton Parker. It seems likely that Buehr met Monet, since his own daughter Kathleen and Monet’s granddaughter, Lili Butler, were playmates, according to George Buehr, the painter’s son. His other daughter Lydia died before adulthood due to diabetes. He returned to Chicago at the onset of World War I and taught at The Art Inst for many years. One of his noted pupils at the Art Institute was Archibald Motley, Jr. the famous African American "Harlem" Renaissance painters. Motley credits Buehr with being one of his finest teachers and one who encouraged his style.
Buehr remained an expressive colorist, but broadened his brushwork somewhat in later years when impressionism waned. Back in America, he was immediately successful. He won a silver medal at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco and the Purchase Price of the Chicago Municipal Art Commission in the following year. So famed was Buehr that had a one man exhibition at the Century of Progress Fair in Chicago in 1934.
After a long and exceedingly productive career, Karl Buehr died in Chicago at the age of eighty-six.
(en.wikipedia.org)


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