Friday, June 17, 2011

“THE POET OF THE POSTER”




Posters by Georges de Feure
From iwannafile.com


Georges de Feure (real name Georges Joseph van Sluÿters, 6 September 1868 – 26 November 1943) was a French painter, theatrical designer, and industrial art designer in the symbolism and Art Nouveau styles.
De Feure was born in Paris. His father was an affluent Dutch architect, and his mother was Belgian. De Feure had two sons, Jean Corneille and Pierre Louis, in the early 1890s with his mistress Pauline Domec and a daughter with his first wife Marguerite Guibert (married 7 July 1897).
In 1886, de Feure was one of the eleven students admitted at the Rijkscademie voor Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam, which he did however leave very quickly for Paris since he felt that formal academic training had nothing to offer him. Being of very independent nature, de Feure never again took up formal artistic studies, and forged his own independent path. He was however influenced by Jules Chéret in his posters for the café concert but most likely was never his pupil and became the key designer of Siegfried Bing for L'Art Nouveau. He designed furniture, worked for newspapers, created theater designs for Le Chat Noir cabaret and posters.
(en.wikipedia.org)


PARIS ALMANACH
Édité par SAGOT; illustré par DILLON
Farblithografie
From gallery.albertina.at


LE DIABLOTIN; JOURNAL LITT. ILLUST.
Farblithografie
From gallery.albertina.at


Window
Stained glass, lead, wood
Gift of Sydney and Frances Lewis
From vmfa.state.va.us


Die Unendlichkeitssucherinnen
From frankzumbach.wordpress.com


Interieur Moderne
From knews.ucoz.ru


La Botaniste
Gouache
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Fleurs d'Automne
From galeriearyjan.com


Die Stimme des Bösen oder Melancholie, Tondo
Current Location Sammlung N. Manoukian, Paris
Source The Yorck Projec
From en.wikipedia.org


La maison Moderne
From hechaencasa.net


Laloie Fuller
From knews.ucoz.ru


Le Journal des Ventes
From knews.ucoz.ru


The Voice of Evil
From shop.billerantik.de


Woman with a Bird
From gallery68.com


De Feure began as an apprentice in the book trade in The Hague, where he became acquainted with symbolism in 1886. In 1890 he moved to Paris to become a pupil of Jules Cheret, designing posters for the Salon Des Cent, Loie Fuller and Thermes Liegois while there. His paintings were exhibited at the Societé Nationale in 1894, in the Salon de la Rose Croix of 1893 and 1894, and at the 1896 Munich Secession. At this time, he was also designing interiors and held the post of 'Professor of Decorative Arts' at the École des Beaux-Arts. Some of De Feure's best works were posters done in the Art Nouveau style, usually containing stylish young women in shades of brown, green, and rose, sometimes showcasing a Japanese influence. The elegance of these popular images caused Lady Abdy to name De Feure "the poet of the poster."
(macklowegallery.com)


Thes du Palais Indien
From kiefer.de


Swan Lake
From fineart-china.com


Polychrome
From steveartgallery.se


Buchette, issu de La Porte des Rêves
Source archive.org
From commons.wikimedia.org


De Feure exhibited and was awarded gold medals at the 1900 Exposition Universelle for the salon grouping. His work was featured in Bing's gallery from 1895 until it closed in 1904, one year prior to Bing's death. In 1902 his work was featured at the first Salon Des Industries Du Mobilier at the Grand Palais in Paris. For Maison De L'Art Nouveau, De Feure made silverware and metalware in a delicate and linear style, similar to his graphic work and furniture work done for Bing. Before the outbreak of WW1, he moved to England where he worked mainly as a set designer. Gifted with a highly inventive mind, he created theater sets and costumes with an aeronautic theme. In 1928 De Feure returned to Paris where he was appointed Professor at the École Nationale Supérieure Des Beaux-Arts. He continued to work and teach throughout the Art Deco period until his death in 1943.
(macklowegallery.com)

Note: I found these images (above) from all over the web. If you own a photo’s copyright and think this page violates Fair Use, please contact me.


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