Wednesday, July 20, 2011

THE MALCZEWSKI OEUVRE




Self Portrait
Oil on canvas, 1892
Source pinakoteka.zascianek.pl
National Museum, Warsaw
From en.wikipedia.org


Self Portrait
From malczewski.w8w.pl


Jacek Malczewski (Radom July 15, 1854 - Cracow October 8, 1929) is one of the most outstanding painters in the history of Polish art. His work forms the backbone of all presentations of Polish Modernist art. The art of the Mloda Polska (Young Poland) movement was a complex phenomenon. It drew on many sources: Romanticism, the historic and folklore traditions, and contemporary European art, especially from the sundry variants of Symbolism. Malczewski's oeuvre is estimated at well-nigh 2,000 oil paintings, 1,200 of which are now in museums and private collections. The largest of these collections may be admired in the National Museums of Poland (Poznan, Warsaw and Cracow).
(polartcenter.com)
Jacek Malczewski was born into a noble family (coat of arms Tarnawa). His father, Julian Malczewski, was secretary general of the Estates Credit Union for the Radom district; his mother, Maria Korwin Szymanowska, was a daughter of Aleksander, an officer in the Napoleon’s army and of “Broncia’, his parents’ maid. In 1867 his parents sent him to the estate of his uncle Karczewski in Wielgo. In 1871 he moved to Cracow where he went to “gimnazjum” (high school) and started nondegree studies in the School of Fine Arts (SSP). Later, at the request of the painter Jan Matejko, Malczewski abandoned the gimnazjum and studied only at the SSP. In 1876 he started two year studies in Parisian École des Beaux-Arts. In 1877 he returned to Matejko’s workshop and was under strong influence of both Matejko and Grottger. In 1880 he visited Italy then Lwow and Podolia. In 1884 he took part in an archeological expedition to Asia Minor organized by Karol Lanckoronski who became his close friend.
(Wikipedia and angelfire.com)
Jacek Malczewski began his artistic education at the Krakow School of Fine Arts. He was supervised by such artists as: Feliks Szynalewski, Władysław Łuszczkiewicz and Jan Matejko. In the years 1876-1877 he studied at Paris École des Beaux Arts (supervised by E.H. Lehmanna). In 1880 Malczewski traveled around Italy. In the years 1884-1885 he took part, as a drawer, in the Karol Lanckoroński Asian expedition. During that period he also visited Greece and Italy. In the years 1885-1886 the artist spent a few months in Munich. After his return he moved to Krakow and settled there. He still often visited Munich and Italy.
(agraart.p)


Smierc Ellenai
All images from torlin.wordpress.com


Ruslki
From commons.wikimedia.org


Rusalki
From oceansbridge.com


Rusalki
From bialczynski.files.wordpress.com


Under the influence of Slowacki’s poem “Anhelli” Malczewski painted in 1883 his famous “Smierc Ellenai” (Death of Ellenai). In 1885 he went to Munich; in 1887 he married Maria Gralewska. They had two children: Julia and Rafal. In 1887-1888 he painted a series “Rusalki” (The undines) based on folk tales.
(Wikipedia and angelfire.com)


Melancholia
Oil on canvas, 1890 - 1894
National Museum, Poznań
Source impresjeee.blox.pl
From en.wikipedia.org


Portret Stanisława Witkiewcza
Oil on canvas, 1897
Source pinakoteka.zascianek.pl
National Museum, Warsaw
From en.wikipedia.org


During 1894-1897 Malczewski introduced symbolism into his paintings. In 1897 Malczewski co founded Towarzystwo Artystow Polskich “Sztuka” (The Association of Polish Artists “The Art”). In 1900, after a conflict with Julian Falat he left ASP (Academy of Fine Arts) and remained outside it for next 10 years.
(Wikipedia and angelfire.com)


Portret Jana Kasprowicza, 1903
Muzeum Narodowe, Wrocław
From pinakoteka.zascianek.pl


Ojczyzna (Tryptyk Prawo, Ojczyzna, Sztuka), 1903
Muzeum Narodowe, Wrocław
From pinakoteka.zascianek.pl


Muzyka pól, 1907
Muzeum Narodowe, Gdańsk
From pinakoteka.zascianek.pl


Self Portrait, 1909
From historiasztuki.com.pl


Self Portrait, 1914
From malczewski.w8w.pl


Portret Piotra Hubala Dobrzańskiego,ok.1914
From muzeum.edu.pl


Portret Józefa Piłsudskiego 1916
National Museum, Warsaw, Poland
From wikimedia.org


Potret W. jesiennym Sloncu, 1916
From agraart.pl
Zatruta studnia (różowa)
From postergaleria.pl


In the years 1896-1900 he taught at the Krakow School of Fine Arts and in the years 1911-1922 he was professor of the Krakow Academy of Fine Arts (also the Academy’s Dean in the years 1912-14). Malczewski spent the years 1914-1915 in Vienna. In 1916 he returned to Krakow. He spent the years prior to his death mainly in Lusławice and Charczewice. Malczewski was cofounder of the Polish Artists’ Association “Sztuka” (1897), and member of the „Zero“group (1908). In his early work period, Malczewski produced mainly portraits and generic scenes. During his later art periods (beginning in the 90’s of the 19th century) he created paintings with symbolical content and biblical, legendary, patriotic, or allegoric-fantasy themes.
(agraart.p)
Jacek Malczewski made his only statement in painting; his immensely rich oeuvre remains ever intriguing and artistically uneven. The first stage was the so-called Siberian cycle, illustrating the torment of Polish deportees, portrayed naturalistically or filtered through the mystical poetry of Slowacki. During the Young Poland period, Malczewski created his own unique symbolic vocabulary in which corporeal and robust figures of chimeras, fauns, angels, and water sprites appear both in allegorical portraits, innumerable costume-clad self-portraits, landscapes, genre and religious scenes and, finally, in compositions which do not correspond to any thematic conventions. The art of Malczewski is dominated distinctly by two motifs, recurring and assorted painterly embodiments: the vocation of art and the artist, and death, under the antique form of Thanatos. The Malczewski oeuvre is the most vivid example of an intermingling of folk motifs and an anti-classical, Dionysian vision of antiquity, typical for Polish modernism; the artist achieved a peculiar polonisation of ancient mythology, not only by placing chimeras and fauns in a Polish landscape but also within an historical-national context, which ultimately proved to be regarded as the most important by this pupil of Matejko.
(artyzm.com)
Jacek Malczewski returned to Cracow in 1921 and resigned from the professorship at ASP. At that time he started a series of paintings “Moje Zycie” (My Life). He often painted self-portraits. During 1923-1926 Malczewski lived in a mansion in Luslawice where he founded a painting school for talented countryside children. A major collection of his works (68 paintings) can be found in Art Gallery in Lviv (Ukraine). At the later years he lost eyesight. Malczewski was buried, according to his wishes in a Franciscan tertiary habit, at the Crypt for the Meritorious (Krypta Zasluzonych) in the Skalka sanctuary in Cracow.
(Wikipedia and angelfire.com)

Note: I found these images (above) from all over the web. If you own a photo’s copyright and think this page violates Fair Use, please contact me.

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