Thursday, July 14, 2011

NATIVE AMERICAN PAINTER



Gilbert Gaul in his studio
From mfordcreech.com
Born in Jersey City, New Jersey, on March 31, 1855 to George W. and Cornelia A. (Gilbert) Gaul, William Gilbert Gaul attended school in Newark, and at the Claverack Military Academy. In New York, he began studying art under L. E. Wilmarth at the National Academy of Design school from 1872 until 1876. He also studied with John G. Brown and at the Art Students' League of New York when it opened in 1875.
(en.wikipedia.org)
He was a highly important late 19th and early 20th century American artist. He lived many years of his life in Tennessee and is one of the earliest and best-known painters of Tennessee genre scenes.
(williamsamericanart.com)


 News from the Front
Private collection
Painting - oil on canvas
From the-athenaeum.org


American Regular Army Infantry
Painting - oil on canvas
From Altermann Galleries &amp
Auctioneersaltermann at altermann.com


His early subjects emulated his teachers’ popular and sentimental genre works. This was revised by his commission from Century magazine to illustrate the historical “Battle and Leaders of the Civil War” published in 1887. He became known as a foremost American painter of battle scenes: “Uniforms and arms of many kinds were to be seen in his studio. The historic accuracy of each detail was studiously sought, and the models who posed as soldiers were fit types. All of these canvases were remarkable for energy of action and, above all, their spirit of belligerency.”
Gaul spent much time in the West at army posts and on Indian reservations in the 1880s. He was one of the five special agents who took the census of 1890 among the Indians, illustrating the “Report on Indians Taxed and Indians Not Taxed” with a strong portrait of Sitting Bull painted from life. Gaul visited the Cheyenne River and Standing Rock agencies then, with later trips to the northwest coast. Some years after, Gaul commented that Indians were “very picturesque” and that “they were a good deal like the white men—some were very good fellows and some were very bad.”
(Resource: SAMUELS’ Encyclopedia of ARTISTS of THE AMERICAN WEST, Peggy and Harold Samuels, 1985, Castle Publishing)
To supplement his income, he provided numerous illustrations to Century Magazine at a time when it was publishing Civil War memoirs; three of his paintings were used as frontispieces to Battles and Leaders of the Civil War (1887–88); he also did work for Harper's Weekly. His work attracted some interest and he was elected as an associate of the National Academy in 1879 for his painting The Stragglers, and in 1882, was elected a full academician for Charging the Battery, being the youngest to achieve that honor. The same year, his painting entitled Holding the Line at All Hazards was awarded the gold medal by the American Art Association, and in 1889, he received the bronze medal at the Paris Exposition for Charging the Battery. He won further medals at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, and at the Buffalo Exposition in 1902.
(en.wikipedia.org)


Leaving Home
Oil on canvas
Birmingham Museum of Art (Birmingham, Alabama, US)
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Tidings from the Front
From allposters.com


Gilbert Gaul’s mother was a Tennessean. At her brother Hiram Gilbert’s death, Gilbert inherited about 5,000 acres in the area of what is now Fall Creek Falls State Park in Van Buren County, TN, in the rugged Cumberland Mountains. He was required to live there 5 years according to the will. He converted a barn into a studio, and later built a cabin on the land. During that period, he painted many locals in the surrounding area, using natives of the region as his models, both in indigenous clothing and in uniform. Some of those paintings included “Leaving Home”, chronicled in the Van Buren County Historical Journal, Volume 2, published in 1982; "Tidings from the Front"; and "The Pickett", said to be one of his finest Civil War paintings. Various families still report their relatives and homes, as depicted in detail in Gaul’s works.
(mfordcreech.com)


Southern Landscape
From mfordcreech.com


An Afternoon Stroll
Private collection
Painting - oil on canvas
From the-athenaeum.org



Homesteading in Tennessee
Private collection
Painting - oil on canvas
From the-athenaeum.org


After his 5-year resident requirement in Van Buren County, Gaul returned to New York City. The work he had done in Tennessee became highly sought after by the editors of "Century Magazine" and "Harper's Weekly", for whom he provided covers, frontispieces, and illustrations to articles. He was a contributor of illustrations to the Century Publishing Company's ambitious three-volume set "Battles and Leaders of the Civil War" (1887). In 1886, the Philadelphia publisher J.B. Lippincott invited artists whom they considered the United States' leading contemporary figure painters each to contribute an original work of art for reproduction in "Book of American Figure Painters". Gaul, being among those so honored, depicted "John Burns at Gettysburg" for the collection.
(mfordcreech.com)



Dakota Indians
Oil on canvas, 1890
By Piedmont Fossil at flickr.com


The Land of the Free
Oil on canvas, 1900
By Piedmont Fossil at flickr.com


Indian by the Campfire
Painting - oil on canvas
Private collection
From museuma.com


Peace Conference
Painting - oil on canvas
Private collection
From museuma.com



Gaul was at the pinnacle of success, but increasingly the American public lost interest in his work and turned toward European developments in art. Increasing public disfavor forced him into teaching and by 1904 he was teaching at Cumberland Female College in McMinnville, Tennessee. By 1905, he had a studio in Nashville, Tennessee where he worked on a series of paintings published in 1907 as a portfolio called "With the Confederate Colors." The limited success of the first portfolio resulted in the cancellation of the projected second one. Soon thereafter Gaul left Nashville to live with his step-daughter in Charleston, South Carolina. By 1910, he was in Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, where he did World War I battle paintings right up until his death. As has been the case with many great artists, recognition came many years after his death. Gaul is now recognized as one of America's great native-born artists. His paintings are illustrated in many important books on history and art, and his paintings are highly sought after.
(williamsamericanart.com)

MEMBERSHIPS:
National Academy of Design

Public Collections:
Toledo Museum, Ohio
Birmingham Museum of Art, Alabama
Thomas Gilcrease of American History and Art, Tulsa, Ok.

Awards:
1882 American Art Association, prize
1886 Prize Fund, gold Medal
1889 Paris Exposition, medal
1893Columbian Exposition, Chicago medal
1901 Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, medal
1910 Appalachian Exposition, Knoxville, gold metal
(Roughton Galleries)

Note: I found these images (above) from all over the web. If you own a photo’s copyright and think this page violates Fair Use, please contact me.


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