Saturday, November 19, 2011

RUSSIAN MEMORY




Imprisoned at Tsarkoe Selo
The Triptych “Imperial Golgotha”
From 01varvara.wordpress.com


The painter of Imprisoned at Tsarkoe Sel, above, is Pavel Ryzhenko, a Russian artist (born in 1970) and professor at the Russian Fine Arts Academy. He specializes in historical & religious paintings. Ryzhenko has been critized for some historical errors.....In an interview the painter said he wanted to show the Tsar returning home in March 1917 after his abdication, but Alexei looks much younger than 11, he wasn’t suffering from an hemophilia attack at the time and no rooms in the Imperial Family private quarters looked like that. Anyway he didn't intend to be historically accurate, but rather to give an idea of what happened and convey feelings, emotions. The Empress is holding the Holy Bible in her hands: her reading was interrupted by the arrival of her husband which can’t hide his despair from the intruder. This painting is part 2 of a 3 part series called Imperial Calvary (Martyrdom) done by the artist after he went to visit the field where the Imperial Family was buried outside Ekaterinburg. He wanted to depict 3 of the most tragic moments in Nicholas II’s last 18 months on this earth.
(Posted by Daniel Briere, June 17, 2009 at forum.alexanderpalace.org)


Nicholas II bidding farewell to his Troops
The Triptych “Imperial Golgotha”
From 01varvara.wordpress.com


Part 1 is this stunning painting titled Nicholas II bidding farewell to his Troops (at Stavka after his abdication) which is also quite moving. Nicholas II isn’t wearing the same uniform he actually did on that awful day (as someone pointed out)…..H e didn’t review his Escort Cossacks on the day he left (he had taken his leave from them the day before, but yes they wore the Revolution’s red ribbon, and yes, some of them had cried and one had collapsed before the Tsar) but in any case it’s quite effective.
(Posted by Daniel Briere, June 17, 2009 at forum.alexanderpalace.org)


Farewell to the shoulder straps
From allart.biz


Triptych The Russian Century
From allart.biz


Another moving painting is the Civil War-time ‘Imperial Shoulder boards’ depicting an Officer burying his shoulder boards and a handkerchief embroidered by Tsarina Alexandra. “Triptych The Russian Century” looks like a photo shoot that would have been taken on the Borodino battlefield at the Centennial celebrations in 1912, with many officer in splendid uniforms, and quite good portraits of the 4 grand-duchesses, Their Majesties, with Alexei between them - in his War-time khaki coat & Medal of St. George! – and besides Anastasia…a younger Alexei in some parade uniform, partly conceiling an even younger Alexei in his sailor suit from the Standart!! Only then I understood the true intention of this artist. His painting wasn’t meant to be a photo, but rather a metaphor of the glorious Russia which had vanished : the representative of the Church, some old veterans, all those devoted soldiers and officers of various Guards regiments, even a cavalry officer from the 1812 War! It really is an ode to an Empire that is no more. Oddly enough almost all of the participants are looking towards the camera. But the photographer isn’t there. But pay attention to the Imperial Family : they’re not looking at the camera (except for the 2 younger Alexei who aren’t really there – only a figment of your imagination) : they’re looking at YOU, and they’re smiling. YOU are the photographer and you’re looking at THEM. What are you thinking? Are you smiling too?? …Brilliant painting!
(Posted by Daniel Briere, June 17, 2009 at forum.alexanderpalace.org)


The Ipatiev House
After the Murder of the Imperial Family
From 02varvara.wordpress.com


On a more tragic note, here is a large photo of part 3 of the Nicholas II’s triptych: The Ipatiev House after the murder of the Imperial Family. It’s, quite gruesome and moving too, with personal items left over after the Bolsheviks' ramsack : papers, photos & books, dolls & eyeglasses, a woman’s boot, the Tsar’s greatcoat, with one his shoulder-board and his Cross of St. George which his captors wanted him to remove, and then Alexei’s toy soldiers, chessboard, his sailor cap…The artist said the white chair was a symbol of the Russian throne, on which only a toy soldier remained as a Tsar-pretender while, in the back, one of the new masters of Russia was looking at what he had just accomplished.
(Posted by Daniel Briere, June 17, 2009 at forum.alexanderpalace.org)


Malyuta Skuratov
From 01varvara.wordpress.com


A Moment of Royal Contemplation
From 01varvara.wordpress.com


The Battle of the Kalka River
From allart.biz


The Battle of the Kalka River took place on May 31, 1223, between the Mongol Empire (led by Jebe and Subutai) and Kiev, Galich, and several other Rus' principalities and the Cumans, under the command of Mstislav the Bold and Mstislav III of Kiev. The battle was fought on the banks of the Kalka River (in present-day Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine) and ended in a Mongol victory. Following the Mongol invasion of Central Asia and the subsequent collapse of the Khwarezmian Empire, a Mongol force under the command of generals Jebe and Subutai advanced into Iraq-i Ajam. Jebe requested permission from the Mongol leader, Genghis Khan, to continue his conquests for a few years before returning to the main army via the Caucasus. While waiting for Genghis Khan's reply, the duo set out on a raid in which they attacked Georgia and killed its king. Genghis Khan granted the duo permission to undertake their expedition, and after making their way through the Caucasus, they defeated a coalition of Caucasian tribes before defeating the Cumans. The Cuman Khan fled to the court of his son-in-law, Prince Mstislav the Bold of Galich, who he convinced to help fight the Mongols. Mstislav the Bold formed an alliance of the Rus' princes including Mstislav III of Kiev. The combined Rus' army, at first, defeated the Mongol rearguard. For several days, the Rus' pursued the Mongols but became spread out over a large distance. The Mongols stopped and assumed battle formation on the banks of the Kalka River. Mstislav the Bold, with his Cuman allies, attacked the Mongols without waiting for the rest of the Rus' army and were defeated. In the ensuing confusion, several other Rus' princes were defeated, and Mstislav of Kiev was forced to retreat to a fortified camp. After holding for three days, he surrendered in return for a promise of safe conduct for himself and his men. Once they surrendered, however, the Mongols slaughtered them and uted Mstislav of Kiev. Mstislav the Bold escaped, and the Mongols went back to Asia, where they joined Genghis Khan.
(allart.biz)


Spring
From 01varvara.wordpress.com


Overflowing Its Banks
From 01varvara.wordpress.com


A Country Road
From 01varvara.wordpress.com


Orchardman
From s3.amazonaws.com


The Victory of Peresvet
From s3.amazonaws.com


Alexander Peresvet, above, also spelled Peresviet, was a Russian Orthodox Christian monk who fought in a single combat with the Tatar champion Temir-murza (known in most Russian sources as Chelubey or Cheli-bey) at the opening of the Battle of Kulikovo (8 September 1380), where they killed each other. The champions killed each other in the first run, though according to a Russian legend, Peresvet did not fall from the saddle, while Temir-murza did.
(mediumaevum.tumblr.com)


Alexander Jaroslavovich Nevsky
From allart.biz


Triptych Repentance-Strike the bell
From 01varvara.wordpress.com


Battle of the Neva
From allart.biz


The Battle of the Neva was fought between the Novgorod Republic and Swedish armies on the Neva River, near the settlement of Ust-Izhora, on July 15, 1240. The purpose of the Swedish invasion was probably to gain control over the mouth of the Neva and the city of Ladoga and, hence, seize the most important part of the Trade Route the Varangians to the Greeks, which had been under Novgorod's control for more than a hundred years. The battle was part of the medieval Swedish-Novgorodian Wars. Existence of the battle is only known Russian sources. First to mention the battle is the Novgorod First Chronicle the 14th century. According to the chronicle, on receiving the news of the advancing Swedish fleet, the 20-year-old Prince Alexander Yaroslavich of Novgorod quickly moved his small army to face the enemy before they had reached Lake Ladoga. The chronicle described the battle as follows: "Swedes came with a great army, and Norwegians and Finns and Tavastians with ships in great numbers, Swedes with their prince and bishops, and they stayed on the Neva, at the mouth of the Izhora, willing to take Ladoga, and to put it short, Novgorod and all of its lands. But still protected the merciful, man-loving God us and sheltered us the foreign people, and the word came to Novgorod that Swedes were sailing to Ladoga; but prince Alexander did not hesitate at all, but went against them with Novgorodians and people of Ladoga and overcame them with the help of Saint Sophia and through prayers of our lady, the Mother of God and Virgin Mary, July 15, in the memory of Kirik and Ulita, on Sunday, (the same day that) the 630 holy fathers held a meeting in Chalcedon; and there was a great gathering of the Swedes; and their leader called Spiridon was killed there; but some claimed that even the bishop was slain; and a great number of them fell; and when they had loaded two ships with the bodies of high-born men, they let them sail to the sea; but the others, that were unnumbered, they cast to a pit, that they buried, and many others were wounded; and that same night they fled, without waiting for the Monday light, with shame. Of Novgorodians there fell: Konstantin Lugotinitch, Yuryata Pinyashchinich, Namest Drochilo, Nesdylov son of Kozhevnik, but including the people of Ladoga 20 men or less, God knows. But Prince Alexander came back home with Novgorodians and people of Ladoga……” Later, Prince Alexander Yaroslavich was nicknamed "Nevsky" (of Neva) for his first significant victory. Two years later, Alexander stalled an invasion of the Livonian Knights during the Battle on the Ice. Despite the victories, there were no Novgorodian advances further west to Finland or Estonia. (allart.biz)

Note: I found these images (above) from all over the web. If you own a photo’s copyright and think this page violates Fair Use, please contact me.


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