Saturday, February 25, 2012

A "CAMOUFLAGE ARTIST"





Bev Doolitle
From greenwichworkshop.com


The Art of Bev Doolittle encompasses the whimsical, the mystical and the spiritual, and her unique camouflage concepts. These themes are interwoven within the complete body of her work and each reveals a different aspect of the artist herself. Her style is characterized by meticulous realism, unsparing attention to detail and an extraordinary talent for drawing. Many of her works are narrative, telling a story or capturing a moment in the world of dreams or the realm of the spirit. Her storytelling captures the imagination, compelling the viewer to bring his own understanding to the work.
"Bev literally could draw as soon as she picked up a pencil," says her mother. "Even before she went to school, she had started drawing horses and people." Bev won her first award at age twelve in an art contest sponsored by the San Gabrial Historical Society and her first one-artist show was held when she was fourteen. Her high school art teacher suggested that she apply for the Saturday Scholarship at the Los Angeles Art Center College of Design; she won the scholarship and began serious art study even before graduating from high school. Later, she was accepted as a student at the Art Center. Much of Bev's subject matter is provided by the out-of-doors. "I love nature," she says, "I try to look beyond the obvious and create unique, meaningful paintings depicting our Western wilderness and it's inhabitants."
Bev Doolittle's art, especially her camouflage work, demands months of development, research of terrain and animal sketching. After developing the concept, she creates "thumbnail" sketches, up to as many as fifty, where she reworks the image until she has achieved her idea. Next, she works out all the questions of detail in a larger comprehensive pencil drawing. A color study follows, enabling her to determine the colors that add most to the composition. Finally, she decides the size for the original and begins to paint. Her technique is extremely tight and detailed and she works in a very demanding medium—transparent watercolor; it takes long weeks of intensive work to complete an original of her work. Bev says, "I start with a concept and attempt to convey it through strong design coupled with detailed realism. I want people to think when they look at my paintings." They do. Bev Doolittle's art compels our involvement. Through the magic of her vision, she vision, she forges an interaction between us and the art, rewarding our attention with the excitement of discovery.
(bnr-art.com)

Season of the Eagle LRS Art Medley
From animalpicturesarchive.com


Indian Ponies LRS Art Medley
From animalpicturesarchive.com


Two Indian Horses
From bnr-art.com


Two more Indian Horses
From greenwichworkshop.com


Bev Doolittle said, "Ever since 'Two Indian Horses' became a limited edition print in 1985, I've been hearing collectors' suggestions that I paint a sequel. Of course, my answer was 'No way! I did that painting already!' However, ten years later, I'm eating those words! Without intending to (really), I have found another fun way to tell the same story. The telling of this story differs greatly. You, the viewer, are witnessing not only what is happening in front of you, but what is taking place behind you as well. Although the format of the painting differs totally from 'Two Indian Horses,' the same two warriors are at it again - about to shorten the chain of cavalry mounts by two."

Sacred Ground
From selltheart.homestead.com


Doubled Back
From bnr-art.com


Bev Doolittle was born and grew up in California. In 1968, she graduated from the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles. She met her husband, Jay, at school, and they started married life with a painting trip to Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks-a portent of things to come. For the next five years, however, the Doolittle’s were engaged in advertising art and TV productions in Los Angeles. "It paid well, but after a while I wasn’t learning," Bev explains, "and we didn’t like living in the city. We wanted to be close to nature, and we wanted to travel." They have now accomplished both. Their frequent travels and backpacking trips have covered the western United States, Canada, Baja California, and East Africa. They now live close to nature in California. Bev Doolittle’s subject matter is provided by the out-of-doors. "I love nature," she says. "I try to look beyond the obvious and create unique, meaningful paintings depicting our Western wilderness and its inhabitants. I start with a concept and attempt to convey it through strong design coupled with detailed realism. I want people to think when they look at my paintings."
(artandnature.com)


Hide and Seek
From pixdaus.com


Hide and Seek
From bnr-art.com


"I set myself the task of hiding pinto ponies in an environment of rocks and snow," explains Doolittle. "Then I defined and refined each image to create a unique composite work where all the separate pieces come together to spell out the words 'Hide And Seek'". Each one of the twenty-four individual images is a delightful exercise in Bev Doolittle's art, blending the pony with its snowy environment brilliantly. But only when all twenty-four come together can you find the letters which are hiding among the rocks and horses.
(artifactsgallery.com)


Hide and Seek
From artandnature.com


Hide and Seek
From 3d-in-2d.com


Hide and Seek
From 3d-in-2d.com


Bev Doolittle said, ''I always saw this painting as a total design spelling out the words HIDE AND SEEK. To me, each one of the twenty-four individual paintings were just one-twenty-fourth of the total image. It wasn't until a business meeting with my publisher that I realized how much people liked the individual paintings. There were six or eight of us sitting around a conference table looking at the twenty-four finished paintings and everyone started picking their favorites. The composite image became forgotten in the discussion over the various merits of the individual paintings. It was finally decided to select the six most popular images and publish them as a portfolio of individual limited edition prints. These six prints have been reproduced the same size as the originals so that all the detail could be retained.''


Pintos
From pixdaus.com


Her camouflage art is loved by art collectors around the world. Through sheer force of talent and dedication, she has achieved a status in the art world few contemporary artists even dream of. Crowded with intricate visual detail, haunted by presences seen and unseen, her paintings captivate the viewer on many levels. She is often called a "camouflage artist" because her distinctive use of context, design and pattern help viewers discover meanings which seem hidden only until they become obvious. "I use camouflage to slow down the storytelling in a painting. But my messages about our wilderness and native peoples are never hidden. Earth is beautiful and exciting and I feel blessed that I have been allowed to explore so much of it," says this talented artist.
(artifactsgallery.com)


Beyond Negotiations
From artifactsgallery.com


There's no need for the subtlety of camouflage to enhance the storyline of this painting (above), the meaning is clear: the time for talking is over. "Beyond Negotiations is one of a few action pieces that I've created," says the artist. "I had a lot of fun with gestures, facial expressions and creating a sense of depth and dust. Containing the charging Indians within a long horizontal border was not an option. This image sums up the results of all the negotiations leading up to the present moment (whatever they may have been!) The fact that the image is bursting at the seams helps to emphasize the immediacy of the warriors' obvious negative response to the last proposal." The original artwork for Beyond Negotiations is not only Bev's first acrylic painting in over thirty years, but her largest ever. The piece began its life as a stone lithograph, but when Bev saw her sketch enlarged, she knew these warriors were destined to become a big painting.
(artifactsgallery.com)
If you want people to believe what you say, put your money where your mouth is. Or, as is the case with Bev Doolittle’s Original Fine Art Lithograph Beyond Negotiations be prepared to sacrifice revenue to protect your promise of Quality. The process through which original lithographs are created is extremely delicate in nature.
Bev spent a fairly long time working on this piece. After a while she started thinking that the image really would have made a pretty neat painting. Having committed to the idea of an Original Lithograph, she put the thoughts aside and completed her drawing. Well, one thing having led to another Bev now has that opportunity to create a painting of Beyond Negotiations and is going to do just that, create it as a painting.
(Scott Usher, Publisher and President, Greenwich Workshop)


The Arrival
From riverwindgalleryart.com


It seems that with every artist there are works that manage to make it into private collections before they are properly documented. Some of these can, in hindsight, be rather important ones. They are known to exist, but their whereabouts are a mystery. As is often the case, in time, they somehow, some way, some day reappear. Bev painted The Arrival in 1977 (above) and sold it through the Carson Gallery in Denver, Colorado, her originals distributor at that time. The work’s trail ended there. Long thought lost, the painting was rediscovered! In the thirty-year period since its rendering, Bev has produced fifty Fine Art Editions, as well as seven books and folios of collected works, all published by The Greenwich Workshop. Until now, The Arrival remained elusive. Storytelling is a hallmark of nearly all of her compositions, and The Arrival is no exception. The palette and design are instantly recognizable. Both are in service of the eponymous “Doolittle narrative” which has shaped the artist’s reputation. Storytelling through design is the hallmark of any Bev Doolittle work, and The Arrival is no exception. There is no escaping the implication of a “storm on the horizon.” Those dark clouds immediately bring to mind the Native American experience in North America. This is storytelling through design at its finest.
(riverwindgalleryart.com)



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