Sunday, February 12, 2012

GOING AND COMING




Going and Coming
Creator Norman Rockwell
Secondary Creator Curtis Publishing Company
From wallpapers-free.co.uk

 
Going and Coming
From theoccidentalobserver.net


Going and Coming, a Norman Rockwell painting, appeared on the cover of The Saturday Evening Post published August 30, 1947. This is another timeless favorite of Rockwell collectors, a classic for the ages. This painting was Rockwell's fifth cover for The Post in 1947. In 1947, there were seven Norman Rockwell Saturday Evening Post covers published. This was also Rockwell's 248th cover illustration out of 322 Rockwell painted for the Post. Rockwell's career with the Post spanned 47 years, from his first cover illustration, Boy With Baby Carriage in 1916 to his last, Portrait of John F. Kennedy, in 1963.
Going and Coming is actually two paintings displayed one on top of the other with Coming displayed mounted above Going. The two original oil on canvas paintings, 16 x 31.5 inches or 40.5 x 80 cm, are part of the collection of the Norman Rockwell Museum of Stockbridge Massachusetts. The lake trip was, according to the pennant flying on the front of the car, a jaunt out to Lake Bennington. Lake Bennington is located in Washington State, just outside Walla Walla. The pennant is not our only clue about nature of the day trip. The small boat, named "Skippy" secured to the roof of the car, along with the fishing pole, suggests to us that Father had some trolling in mind for this trip. Indeed, Mother or one of the children may have been the angler in the family. The cast of characters and the contrasts between the two paintings also tells us a lot about the trip, as well as the family. Starting in the front seat of the car, we see Father, Mother and Little Sister. In the Going painting, Father looks very eager, smoking a fresh cigar. He sits up straight and his hat is still worn fashionably low on his forehead. He grips the steering wheel confidently with both hands. In the Coming painting, however, he looks greatly exhausted. Most of us can relate to that rendition. His cigar has long been finished, only a nub remains. He is hunched over the steering wheel, just hanging on. The day at Lake Bennington has been rough on dear old Dad.
(© 2012 Best Norman Rockwell Art.com. at best-norman-rockwell-art.com)

 
Photograph for Going and Coming
Gene Pelham (American, 1909–2004)
Study for The Saturday Evening Post, August 30, 1947
Norman Rockwell Museum Archival Collections
Norman Rockwell Licensing, Niles, Illinois
From artblart.wordpress.com

 
Going and Coming
Tear sheet, The Saturday Evening Post, August 30, 1947
Norman Rockwell Museum Archival Collection 

©1947 SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis
From artblart.wordpress.com


Going and Coming is a good example of a story painting that is both seasonal and topical. The added ingredient of humor makes it even more engaging and thus contributes to its success. The use of two images within one picture allows Rockwell to be more detailed and create a continuum of time. We see before and the after of the imagined event, a family’s summer outing by the lake. Clues abound for the reader's enjoyment in unraveling the story line. The use of a split canvas to portray a juxtaposition of an event, time, age, or place is an effective device that invites comparison of the two scenes. This technique is employed by Rockwell in only two other Post covers, but was commonly used by other Post cover illustrators. In most cases it derives from a comic strip's use of a series of "frames" to tell a story. In this case, however, artist Don Spaulding, who studied with Rockwell in 1950 and spent several months living in the schoolhouse on the West Arlington Green, cites George Hand Wright’s painting of Going to and Returning from the Seashore as the inspiration for Going and Coming.
(collections.nrm.org)

 
Behind the camera
From cache.gawkerassets.com

 
You'll notice the book jacket shows a painting of a family embarking on a summer vacation—Granny, Spot and all—coupled with a photo of a similar scene with far less action. There's a kid sticking out of the car in both, but many family members are missing. This is because they were photographed separately, in Rockwell's studio, and painted in where needed. You'll also notice that the photo on the jacket is reversed—the car was pointed in the other direction.
(gizmodo.com)





Photographs for Going and Coming
Media negative Norman Rockwell Art Collection Trust
From collections.nrm.org

 
Charcoal study for Going and Coming
Creator Norman Rockwell
Secondary Creator Curtis Publishing Company
Private Collection
From collections.nrm.org

 
The Saturday Evening Post cover for 1947 tells the story of the eagerness and anticipation of a family group on the way to a summer adventure. Their boat is strapped to the roof of the car, and mother, father, four children, and the family dog are animated and clearly excited. The lower canvas depicts the same characters exhausted and fulfilled after a long day at Bennington Lake. Only the grandmother sits stoic and unchanged in the back seat, a bit of humor in itself.
(America’s Favorite Iillustrator, Norman Rockwell by Helen H. Hill at antiquesjournal.com)

2 comments:

Mel said...

Can you tell me what the item is that is attached to the side of the car/truck? A folding chair? A ladder? A table? I just cant tell.

Mel said...

What is the item on the side of the car? Ladder? Chair? Table?