Friday, February 24, 2012

YOU'LL DIE LAUGHING





Jack Davis with Mrs. Davis
Posted By Jyrki Vainio at comicartfans.com


Jack (center) with a few ‘friends’
From meansheets.files.wordpress.com


Jack Davis' unique humorous style is instantly recognizable and has brought smiles to the faces of millions over the past five decades. Most famous for his masterful caricature work for MAD Magazine, TV Guide, Time Magazine and many others, Jack Davis will always have a sticky place in the heart of every horror fan. With his many memorable and hilarious interpretations of our favorite creepy characters he proved he was the master of mixing ghouls and giggles. Davis' wacky and witty work graced magazines, bubble gum cards, ads, record albums and posters which are now treasured collectors' items. And, according to the U. S. Congress, he was one of the artists whose delightfully gruesome work in the classic EC horror stories of the 1950's helped warp a generation with twisted tales of terror in comics like Tales from the Crypt.
(gammillustrations.bizland.com)


Williams (Shirley) and Penny Marshall (Laverne)
Front of the June 18, 1977
Issue of TV Guide
From blogs.dixcdn.com


Hunting Dog
From michaelspornanimation.com


Hunting Dog
From michaelspornanimation.com


Jack Davis (b. December 2, 1924) is like the Jerry Lewis of illustrators. What a ham! From Alfred E. Neuman’s MAD Magazine to countless TV Guide covers, his comedic, caricaturesque style has inspired and influenced (i.e., been ripped off by) legions of cartoonists. His parodies will likely be parodied forever!
(meansheets.files.wordpress.com)


Homer and Jethro Life can be miserable Album covers
From raggedclaws.com


Homer and Jethro Go West Album covers
From raggedclaws.com


During his adolescence, Jack Burton Davis' first work was published in the juvenile periodical Tip Top Comics. When he was in the Navy from 1945 to 1947, he cooperated on the Navy News, for which he created the character Boondocker. After the Second World War, he attended the University of Georgia and cooperated on the campus magazine Bullsheet. In 1951, he joined EC Comics, after having finished his continued studies at the New York's Art Students League and having assisted artists like Ed Dodd and Mike Roy on respectively 'Mark Trail' and 'The Saint'.
(lambiek.net)


Tales from the Crypt No 34
From comicartfans.com


Because Davis was quick and efficient, Feldstein and Kurtzman could always depend on him, making him the most versatile artist of the EC crew. Davis worked for all the EC horror comics, including Vault of Horror, Tales from the Crypt, Haunt of Fear, Crime SuspenStories, Shock SuspenStories, and Incredible Science-Fiction. When most of the EC titles folded in 1955 due to the Comics Code, Davis continued to work for the company's funny titles MAD and Panic.
(lambiek.net)
Jack not only illustrated for EC, but also wrote a number of stories, particularly for the war books. His tenure at EC comics lasted from 1950 to 1956, but Jack really found his stride in 1952 when they launched "MAD" comics--which later became "Mad" magazine. Jack illustrated the first story in the first issue of "MAD" (November 1952), which was a spooky old house parody called "Hoohah!" He stayed on doing "MAD" and other EC titles for years.
(crazycampsongs.com)


6 Foot Frankie
Eerie No 1
Posted By Jim Warden at comicartfans.com


During that time he also drew for other comics, including Stan Lee's pre-Marvel "Atlas" comics of the 1950s, such as "Rawhide Kid," "Tales to Astonish," "Journey into Mystery" and "Gunsmoke Western." In 1961, with the success of "MAD," Dell Comics approached Jack about doing a humor magazine, called "YAK YAK." It only lasted a few issues. Jack also illustrated for other humor magazines, including "Trump," "Humbug" and "Help!", as well as monster magazines like "Creepy" and "Eerie." Jack enjoyed doing these, especially as they offered plenty of opportunities to draw Frankenstein, his favorite character. There's no doubt that one of Jack's favorite assignments ever was when "Famous Monsters" magazine commissioned him to draw the big green guy with too-many-stitches and a couple of electrodes in his neck for a six-foot, "Giant, Life-Size Frankenstein Pin-up" poster in 1962. In 1965, Jack returned to working on "MAD"--drawing stories and covers on a regular basis. He actively continued drawing for "MAD" up until a few years ago, although his earlier work shows up regularly in current issues of MAD, through reprints and re-use.
(crazycampsongs.com)


Welcome to Texas
From raggedclaws.com


TIME Jun 18,1973
From nova100.typepad.com


One of the most popular and successful publications in the history of the medium is MAD Magazine. When Al Feldstein became editor he immediately decided he wanted to expand the focus of the magazine which had begun as a parody of primarily the comic or cartoon industry into mainstream popular culture. Movies, books and just about any other prominent subject or personality became fodder for the Madmen at MAD. Feldstein also sought after an immediately recognizable, icon or symbol for the magazine. In issue Number 30, the new and improved Alfred E. Neuman was introduced. The front cover is the classic portrait of Alfred, the back cover is by Jack Davis featuring every major personality of the time peering in. Feldstein was announcing to those that would now be the targets that Alfred and the new MAD had arrived. Hollywood, sports, politicians, entertainers and TV personalities are all depicted as only Jack Davis could do it. The center head of Alfred is not by Davis but was by Mingo. It was executed on a separate board. This part is a Color stat.
(comicartfans.com)


Water Polo - World's Toughest Sport
From goplanet.files.wordpress.com


Yak Yak Cover
From scottbrothers.wordpress.com


Yak yak Cover
From scottbrothers.wordpress.com


Yak Yak Back
From scottbrothers.wordpress.com


At the same time, Jack also did freelance work for advertising agencies—sometimes doing illustrations for ad campaigns that weren't too different from some of the ad parodies he created for MAD, such as his poster for the classic film "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad. Mad World," which Jack reprised in parody form for the 1966 Mad paperback "It's a World, World, World, World Mad." By then, Jack's work was everywhere and his distinct style was immediately recognizable to a large segment of the population, especially with the dozens of movie posters, record albums, book covers, ads, and magazines covers and illustrations he developed for leading publications such as "TV Guide," "Time," "Life," "Playboy," "Ebony," "Esquire" and countless others.
(crazycampsongs.com)


1960 Playboy Watercolor Cartoon
Posted By Rob Stolzer at comicartfans.com


This piece (above) appeared on page 113, of the November 1960 issue of Playboy. One guy in the audience says to another, "This fight's fixed!", when he sees one of the boxers getting ready to "take a dive". According to Larry, Davis drew a total of 15 cartoons for Playboy, not counting the assisting he did on "Little Annie Fanny", making his work for the magazine quite scarce. In terms of the artwork, Davis seems to have really gone the extra mile for his Playboy work, probably because it was the creme de la creme for cartoonists and illustrators. The pen work is just terrific, but even better is the richly painted watercolor work. Davis appears to have used some touches of acrylic to create both the highlights and the smokey atmosphere in the illustration. For a piece with so much brown, it certainly is wonderfully rich in person.
(comicartfans.com)
Davis was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2003. He also received the National Cartoonists Society Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996. A finalist for inclusion in the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1990, 1991 and 1992, he received the National Cartoonists Society's Advertising Award for 1980 and their Reuben Award for 2000. In June 2002, Davis had a retrospective exhibition of his work at the Society of Illustrators in New York. He was inducted into the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame in 2005.
(WIKIPEDIA)


TIME Jun 18,1973
From nova100.typepad.com


Jack Davis, the conspicuous and celebrated cartoonist with 36 Time magazine credits on his resume, hasn't had it so good lately -- both knees have been replaced, his hearing is impaired, a recent fall left him with a fractured vertebra, and the shingles, which first visited him three years ago, won't let go. "I'm a mess," he said over breakfast at the Sandcastle, "but I'm still here, and I keep busy," his cheerful bearing trumping aches and pains. What all this means is that on most days, he walks across the breezeway from his kitchen to his studio. After "knocking around" his workplace for a few minutes, he will sit down with his coffee in his Bulldog mug, look out to the Hampton River, and conjure up an idea for something or somebody. He still has a representative who brings him business, but mostly Jack creates drawings for charities and for his friends, especially those with an affinity for the Bulldogs. Drawing images for Dawg aficionados is balm for his soul. It is therapeutic for a seasoned artist who maintains overt passion for the things he likes.
(times-herald.com)


Jack Fishing
From michaelspornanimation.com


Jack at Work
From michaelspornanimation.com



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