Saturday, March 10, 2012

THE DEAN OF ILLUSTRATORS




Dean Cornwell
From nex0003.wordpress.com


Dean Cornwell (1892 – 1960) was a American illustrator and muralist. He began working as a cartoonist Louisville Herald and later moved to New York. While there, he studied at the Art Student League of New York. He eventually moved to London where he studied murals as an apprentice to Frank Bragwyn. Cornwells work were featured in magazines, books, advertising, and posters. They were featured on the pages of Cosmopolitan, the Red Book, and Good House Keeping. He became a very well known illustrator earning him the name “Dean of Illustrators”
(nex0003.wordpress.com)


The History of the West Los Angeles Public Library
From nex0003.wordpress.com

 
Captain Blood series
From growingintothemystery.net


Dean of Illustrators
From members.dandy.net

 
A Man for Cousin Emily
From americanartarchives.com


Man at Crossroads
From kihm2.files.wordpress.com


Dean Cornwell was born March 5, 1892 in Louisville, Kentucky. His father was Charles Louis Cornwell, who was a civil engineer and an expert draftsman. His mother's maiden name was Margaret Dean, which became Dean Cornwell's first name. Dean Cornwell had a natural talent for drawing, and in high school his cartoons appeared in the school newspaper and year books. After he graduated in 1910 at the age of eighteen he worked as a cartoonist for The Louisville Herald. In 1911 he moved to Chicago to study at the Chicago Art Institute, where he met another young artist Henry C. Kiefer, and to work on the art staff of The Chicago Tribune. In 1915 he moved to New York City to seek a career in commercial illustration and to study at the Art Students League. He also studied at a summer school in Leonia New Jersey with Harvey Dunn, who inspired him greatly. In 1918 he married Mildred Kirkham. They raised a daughter, named Patricia, and a son, Kirkham, whose first name is also his mother's maiden name, Kirkham. In 1924 the family moved to Mamaroneck, NY. In the 1920s he taught commercial illustration to several future pulp artists at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn such as H. Winfield Scott, Walter Baumhofer, and A. Leslie Ross. He sold slick magazine illustrations to American Weekly, Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Harper's Bazaar, Life, Redbook, and The Saturday Evening Post.
(David Saunders at pulpartists.com)


Woodbury Soap, 1924
From robschwager.com


Woodbury Soap, 1924
From robschwager.com


Woodbury Soap, 1925
From robschwager.com


In 1927 he began a five-year mural project for the Los Angeles Public Library. He also painted murals for Rockefeller Center, the 1939 World's Fair in NYC, and he continued to accept mural commissions off and on for the rest of his life. Although he was too old to serve in WWII, he created many patriotic posters and advertisements at the time. After the war he painted advertisements for General Motors, Seagram's, Coca Cola, and Goodyear.
(David Saunders at pulpartists.com)


The Man of Galilee, 1928


The Founding of Los Angeles
From pigtailsinpaint.wordpress.com


Sketch for 'The Founding of Los Angeles'
From pigtailsinpaint.wordpress.com


Two Studies for the Los Angeles Library Murals
From robschwager.com


Victory Pace War Bond advertisement, 1944
From decodog.com


Wartime Evacuation
From pigtailsinpaint.wordpress.com


Cornwell is probably better known as a mural painter, an American version of Frank Brangwyn. In fact he once rented a studio in London from Brangwyn. His work was seen in the 1939 World's Fair (the General Motors Building), and in Radio City, New York, among other sites. He also undertook masses of advertising work and got particularly involved in imagery for the promotion of War Bonds. His work is technically fascinating. In Watson's book on Forty Illustrators (1946) he reveals that he makes a photostat of his oil study for a piece and projects it on to the canvas (with an epidiascope) to assist in drawing the major lines of the composition. In 1946 Cornwell admitted to over a thousand illustrations, usually in oil color. He paid tribute to Howard Pyle who is largely credited with introducing the illustration executed in oil color - back in the days when a color illustration in a magazine was a rarity and often framed by the reader.
(fulltable.com)




ADVERTISEMENTS FOR WYETH'S
All images from fulltable.com


The Fight at Minowa in Palestine
The Robe endpaper illustration, 1947
From peplum.wikia.com


The Dawn of Abdominal Surgery
Cornwell's working methods, from Byrnes
Complete Guide 1948
From fulltable.com


The Dawn of Abdominal Surgery
Cornwell's working methods, from Byrnes,
Complete Guide 1948 From fulltable.com


The Dawn of Abdominal Surgery
Cornwell's working methods
From Byrnes, Complete Guide 1948
From fulltable.com



Mr Cornwell's method of Working
From fulltable.com



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