Friday, March 30, 2012

MASTER PROPAGANDA ARTIST




Ludwig Hohlwein Portrait
Photo Anton Sahm, Munchen
From c590298.r98.cf2.rackcdn.com


Shortly after the turn of the century Berlin became the center of commerce, and the birth place of the art movement called Plakatstil (poster style). The standout artist/ posterist in Berlin at the birth of this movement was Lucian Bernhard. Bernhard in 1906 was the first to move away from the decorative tendencies of Art Nouveau and focused on one product image combined with bold minimal lettering. This approach became known as the Sachplakat or Object Poster. Plakatstil became an universal style without having any direct links to a specific school or movement. The characteristics of this style were bold lettering, a simple central image, and distinctive eye-catching color. Because this style allowed its message to be easliy accessible it was aesthetically pleasing.
During WWI, Hohlwein produced emotional posters for fundraising and propaganda purposes. Between the wars Hohlwein designed travel posters, getting more involved with photography and airbrushing. During WWII Hohlwein produced War posters for the Nazi's. He became known as a master propaganda artist.
(anneserdesign.com)
Accelerating industrialization in the first decade of the twentieth century turned Germany into a fertile ground for the orientation of art towards industry. The combination of industry and art gets an ideal testing ground in the design of company posters and product advertisements.
In the German “plakatstil” (or poster-style) all ornaments and embellishments are further omitted. The simplification is even more extensive, leaving only taut lines. This leaves us with recognizable pictorial references and a persuasive communication, a style consistent with the commercial and technological demands of the age. This new type of poster soon became far-famed.
(Excerpt from "Ludwig Hohlwein" by Professor H.K. Frenzel at iconofgraphics.com)


Golf in Germany
From barewalls.com


RIQUETTA
From img15.nnm.ru


RIQUETTA
From 2all.co.il


Plakatstil incorporated color combinations not seen in other art forms such as Art Nouveau. Plakatstil shied away from the complexity of Art Nouveau and helped emphasize a more modern outlook on poster art. Plakatstil, German “Poster Style” begun in 1905 by Lucien Bernhard in Berlin and in Munich by Ludwig Hohlwein.
(Plakatstil , 2010 by floppydisc at floppydisc.wordpress.com)
Ludwig Hohlwein (born 27 July 1874 in Wiesbaden - died 15 September 1949 in Berchtesgaden) enjoyed a privileged childhood in a prominent family. While studying architecture at the Technical University in Munich from 1895 onwards, he made his first illustrations for the newspaper of the Academic Architects Association. He designed the association’s program booklets, invitations and book decorations. After his studies in Munich and at the Dresden Academy he undertook study trips to London and Paris. Eventually he settled in Munich as an architect. In addition to the interiors of private homes, he took orders for decorating ocean liners.
In 1901 Ludwig married Leoni Dorr. They had two children. In this period he regularly takes part in exhibitions with his prints, watercolors and tempera paintings in the Munich Glass Palace. He developed his unique style early on in his career which showed little changes over the next forty years. Hohlwein left architecture and started focusing on graphic design in 1906. He began as a poster artist, building up a self-taught style which was primarily influenced by the collage technique of the British Beggarstaff Brothers. He was very productive and quickly gained name and fame in the world of graphics and among important clients.
(Excerpt from "Ludwig Hohlwein" by Professor H.K. Frenzel at iconofgraphics.com)


Direct China Cotton Importers
Wonalancet Company Nashua NH, 1909
From skinnerinc.com


Vintage Car Poster, 1912
From vinmag.com


Plakat Bayern, 1913
From kettererkunst.com


Hermann Scherrer, Tailor, 1913
From periodpaper.com


Kunstdruck Kristallpalast
From cgi.ebay.de


Pelikan, 1913
From floppydisc.files.wordpress.com


Heroic Realism illustration
From anm101w11.files.wordpress.com


Plakat 'Wankbahn, Partenkirchen'
From p2.la-img.com


Wilhelm Mozer
From p2.la-img.com


Kitty Starling, 1914
From periodpaper.com


Rhenania Phosphat
From reklamebox.com


Deutsches Museum Munchen
From antikbar.co.uk


Adler Typewriter Ad Poster
From c590298.r98.cf2.rackcdn.com


Riquet Pralinen, 1920
From floppydisc.files.wordpress.com


Hohlwein's most creative phase of work and a large variety of his best-known posters were created between 1912 and 1925. It was during this critical period that he developed his own unique visual style. By 1925, he had already designed 3,000 different advertisements and became the best-known German commercial artist of his time. Poster historian Alain Weill comments that "Hohlwein was the most prolific and brilliant German posterist of the twentieth century. . . Beginning with his first efforts, Hohlwein found his style with disconcerting facility. It would vary little for the next forty years. The drawing was perfect from the start, nothing seemed alien to him, and in any case, nothing posed a problem for him. His figures are full of touches of color and a play of light and shade that brings them out of their background and gives them substance."
(Richard Poulin, ROCKPAPERINK at rockpaperink.com)


Kunst Im Druck, 1926
From i.allday.ru


Jgeha Schokolade, 1926
From periodpaper.com


Victoria Fahrr├Ąder, 1926
For Victoria-Werke, AG, Nuremberg, Germany
From periodpaper.com


Mannheimer Zeitung Kunstdruck, 1926
From cgi.ebay.de


Winter in Duitsland, 1930
Advertising rail travel to German Wintersport resorts
From originalskiposters.com


Reich vocational competition for German Youth, 1934
From webposters.adm.ntu.edu.sg


Poster 11th Olympic Games Berlin, 1936
From p2.la-img.com


Poster Olympic Winter Games 1936
From sala17.files.wordpress.com


Brochure for a Sporting event, 1936
From creativereview.co.uk


Hohlwein's work relied mostly on strong figurative elements with reductive qualities of high contrast, intense flat color, and bold patterns of geometric elements. This is evident in his iconographic poster for Hermann Scherrer. The figurative element of the man is optically centered in the field of the poster with no apparent horizon line. The well-dressed gentleman and his riding accessories, as well as his pure-bred dog, are all represented in a reductive, stark manner combined with vivid color and an abstract, black-and-white checkerboard pattern. Here, Hohlwein treats this distinctive pattern as a two-dimensional plane. It is in extreme contrast to the surrounding three-dimensional compositional elements, creating a strong and memorable focal point for the poster. His adaptation of photographic images was based on a deep and intuitive understanding of visual design principles. His creative use of color and architectural compositions dispels any suggestion that he used photographs as the basis of his creative output. Additionally, his use of high tonal contrasts, interlocking shapes, and distinctive graphic patterns made his work instantly recognizable and memorable. Aside from Lucian Bernhard, LudwigHohlwein was one of the most successful and celebrated designers of the Plakatstil and Sachplakat modes or "poster" and "object poster" styles in Germany during this time period.
(Richard Poulin, ROCKPAPERINK at rockpaperink.com)


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