Wednesday, March 28, 2012

MUSICIAN AND DRAWER




Always kept Sharp Eye
SouthwestArt Magazine
From southwestart.com


Old Friends
From cmdudash.com


Although C. Michael Dudash (born 1952) lives in Pennsylvania, his heart currently resides in the Old West—and its more colorful, less complicated times. His paintings OLD FRIENDS (above) and THE LAST HAND smolder with the scent of wood fires, kerosene lamps, tall-grass prairie, and sage. Warm golden tones bestow an antique quality to the work. But Dudash’s roots aren’t quite so far from his western subject matter. He grew up in the small town of Mankato in Minnesota. “I grew up with big sky,” he says. His parents had artistic and musical talent and encouraged their five children’s abilities. His mother attended art school for a year, but chose motherhood instead of an art career. His Hungarian father was a musician and had wanted to be an architect, but applied his creative design and building talents to carpentry. Dudash describes himself as “a life-long musician and drawer.” In addition to painting, he plays guitar and piano. After graduating from high school in 1970, he spent a year at Macalester College in St. Paul as a fine-art major, but left school to pursue music. Five years on the road as a full-time musician took him to New England, where he met his wife-to-be in Vermont. “At that point I decided to go back to my other talent, which was art,” he says. So he returned to Minnesota to attend the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. “I was only in art school for a semester when McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. offered me a job. Although I had some formal art education—life drawing, drafting, and some painting—I had no training as an illustrator. I learned on the job at McGraw-Hill for a year and then was basically on my own.”
(C. Michael Dudash | Accuracy & Emotion by Reed Glenn at southwestart.com)


Wonderful Life Movie Poster
From cmdudash.com


Over the Top Settlers
West Gallery Tucson, AZ
From cmdudash.com


Dudash left the company, and he and his wife, Valerie, moved back to her home state of Vermont. He found an agent in New York and began producing illustrations for Readers Digest, TV Guide, the movie industry, and other outlets. “I started winning awards and was pretty successful. I only planned to do it for a couple of years, because I always wanted to be a painter,” he says. But like one of his inspirations, renowned 20th-century illustrator N.C. Wyeth (father of artist Andrew Wyeth), he met success quickly, and the work and its rewards were too good to pass up—especially since he was now supporting a growing family.
(C. Michael Dudash | Accuracy & Emotion by Reed Glenn at southwestart.com)


The Gift Poster
From beginningartist.com


You create visual surprise by doing something different, something the viewer isn't expecting. Doing the unexpected can draw the viewer into your art, because by not telling the viewer everything, you trigger his or her imagination. Anytime you can involve the viewer's imagination, you make your art much more exciting. C. Michael Dudash very creatively used this idea of simplifying things into simple shapes in his paintings. Take this first example (above)from early in Michael's Dudash's career. It was for a story in Field and Stream or Sports Afield magazine. Michael's technique consisted of applying a thin layer of darker oil paint and then removing it where he wanted light areas. Look at how simply the trees in the background are done – just sky holes here and there. The same is true of the car. By simplifying, he only needed to show strategically placed highlights and your imagination supplies the rest. Notice he used those strategically placed highlights to create a path for your eyes to flow through the painting. Your eyes go first to the man, the star of this picture, and then follow the roof to the left. Then you follow the highlights down to the rear tire. He rubs some paint off to represent grass which brings your eyes back to the man. He created the same sort of path around the front of the car. Mystery and visual surprise everywhere. All from simplifying, painting less, not more, and involving your imagination.
(beginningartist.com)


Sparro - Portrait of a Cowboy Singer
From legacygallery.com


While living in VT, Michael was fortunate to have had the opportunity to paint and study with Richard Schmid and his wife Nancy Guzik. Michael has participated in Richard’s Rist Canyon Art Auction for the last several years as well. “Richard is a wonderful teacher and human being, and I have always appreciated his ability to inspire his friends, fellow artists and collectors.” Michael has had numerous one-man shows and participated in a large number of group shows. He has won awards of excellence in the 2004 & 2005 National Oil Painters of America shows, including best portrait. His recent painting of Wild Bill Hickok was purchased by the Pearce Western Art Museum for its permanent collection. He has conducted workshops at his studio and in several locations including Los Angeles, Dallas & San Antonio, TX, Columbus, OH, and Tokyo, Japan. His ever growing number of corporate and individual collectors appreciate the draftsmanship, use of light and colorful atmosphere that Michael is able to bring to his work. Although he has increasingly been turning his attention to painting the characters and history of the old west, Michael still loves to paint the variety of subjects that he finds around him, and is equally adept at masterfully handling landscapes, figures, portraits and still lifes.
(legacygallery.com)


Green Pastures

His smile was sure friendly

Sisters

Sagebrush Trail
All images from saksgalleries.com


“I have always been interested in well executed and beautifully designed oil painting, no matter what the venue, style or label.” Michael says. “Most artists, myself included, can count dozens of incredible representational painters who have come before us as positive influences and teachers. Although often the most important, subject matter is only a part of the painting. The challenge for a painter is to take his subject of interest and create works of art that are moving, beautiful, timeless and universal in their appeal. As for me, I have to daily rely on the good Lord and His inspiration to help me accomplish this formidable task.” Although trained in the fine arts, his decision to begin a career in classic illustration won him a prestigious and national reputation, with his numerous awards and hundreds of Clients being far too many to list. His transition back into fine art was the natural course for Michael, as his influences as an oil painter have always been the classical painters such as Sargent, Zorn, Fechin, the Impressionists, as well as the golden age illustrators like N. C. Wyeth, Dean Cornwell, Haddon Sundbloom, Harvey Dunn and Rockwell. As with most artists, Michael is incredibly passionate about his life’s work.
(legacygallery.com)


She grew up holdin' her own
The Legacy Gallery
Jackson Hole, WY

A man of peace
The Legacy Gallery
Scottsdale, AZ

Into the high country
The Legacy Gallery
Scottsdale, AZ

Winter mountain dusk
All Images from cmdudash.com


Over the past 27 years, Michael Dudash has completed over 1,250 oil paintings and assignments for clients worldwide. His earlier illustration career focused on creating artwork for the movie industry, advertisers, publishers, books, magazines, design firms, corporations and institutions such as the United Nations and the U.S. Postal Service. Those pieces have won him a national reputation and numerous awards from the Society of Illustrators (NYC & LA), the Society of Publication Designers, Communications Arts and HOW Magazine. Michael has written and published articles for American Artist, the Artists Magazine and Step-by-Step Graphics. He has featured his work as a guest lecturer at the Booth Western Art Museum & Washington University. In recent years, Michael has turned his efforts almost exclusively to the sale of his original oil paintings and limited edition prints. He has begun to branch out internationally with his work and has found the same success abroad as he has enjoyed at home. Michael works out of his home and studio in Vermont.
(tapestryproductions.com)


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