Wednesday, March 21, 2012

STORYTELLER WITH A BRUSH




The Art of Tom Lovell
From thaddeuslowe.name


Tom Lovell was equally famous for his exciting and thought- provoking illustrations for such magazines as Life, The Saturday Evening Post and National Geographic—as well as his stirring images of sweeping Civil War battles which were considered so definitive that they were telecast as part of the famous Public Television documentary on the conflict. Lovell was the first artist to win the National Academy of Western Art’s highest honor, the Prix de West, twice. He was elected to the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame in 1974 and eventually named a Hall of Fame Laureate. In 1992, he was honored by both the National Academy of Western Art and the National Cowboy Hall of Fame with a Lifetime Achievement Award and a prestigious one-man retrospective show. He has left a lifetime of work that will influence, impress and instill emotion for years to come.
(greenwichworkshop.com)


Sioux chief with horse
From img484.imageshack.us


Comanche Moon, Study
From media.liveauctiongroup.net


Tom Lovell's view of history is an intensely personal one, for he holds a special spyglass to long-ago events, a delicate piece of equipment which enables him to see what other might miss. His optical lens is his mind's eye, a lens ground by constant education and polished by imagination. Tom has been packing his sketchbook with him since he was nine years old. He grew up in New Jersey and took that pad with him often when he visited the Natural History Museum. "Even then I was a student of the American Indian", says Tom. But when he became a professional illustrator, no one was interested in drawings of Native Americans. Illustrators had to do pictures as showcases for stories, and Lovell was especially good at that. He made his living at it for nearly forty years. "We were never to reveal or tell the whole plot", that artist recalls. "And yes, we DID always read the story. Our job was to make people appear attractive and interesting. We'd get the manuscript and read and reread it and make roughs and submit them to the editors. Many illustrators had yearly contracts with magazines and had so many pictures to do. Illustrators have to be disciplined and learn how to research." Discipline and research continue to be the driving force behind every project Tom Lovell undertakes. They also help explain why he is today in the front rank of artists.
(thewildeye.com)
“I enjoy recreating the past”, Tom Lovell once said. “As a boy, books of adventure in far off times and places were real. At seventeen, I shipped as a deckhand on the Leviathan and various other jobs followed. Enrollment in the College of Fine Arts at Syracuse University was the next step. At this time the newsstands were filled with pulp magazines and I produced a cover in oils and eight or ten dry brush illustrations a month during my senior year. The message on the covers had to out scream a hundred others. After graduation I continued to free lance for the pulps for six years before tackling the slicks. In 1944, I enlisted in the Marine Corps and was assigned to an easel. Illustration continued to flourish after the war.” Tom Lovell passed away in 1997.
(military-art.com)
Thomas Lovell was born February 5, 1909 in a New York City hospital. His father was Henry S. Lovell Jr, a telephone engineer in the early years of that industry. His mother was Edith Scott (Russell) Lovell. His brother Bob was two years older and his sister Margaret was three years younger. They lived at 39 Alexander Avenue in Nutley, New Jersey. In 1927 he was the valedictorian at his high school graduation, where he spoke on "the ill treatment of the American Indian by the U. S. Government.” He attended Syracuse University, where his roommate was the future illustrator, Harry Anderson. He also attended classes with Elton Fax, another art student who went on to illustrate pulp magazines. While still at school, he began to sell illustrations to pulp magazines. In 1931 he graduated Syracuse University, where he also met his future wife, Gloyd "Pink" Simmons. In 1934 he and "Pink" married and moved to Norwalk, Connecticut, where they raised their two children, David and Deborah. After 1936, Tom Lovell began to work regularly for advertising agencies and slick magazines, such as The American, Woman's Home Companion, and Cosmopolitan.
(pulpartists.com)


Bayou
From icollector.com


‘Unter Deck’
From blog.stuttgarter-zeitung.de


1936-03 Dime Mystery
From pulpartists.com


1936-07 Top Notch
From pulpartists.com


He went on to paint covers for Ace-High Western, Clues, Complete, Detective Tales, Dime Detective, Rangeland Romances, Star Western, and Top-Notch. He also drew pen & ink interior story illustrations for The Shadow, Courtroom Stories, Popular Western, Triple Western, and Clues. In WWII Lovell joined the Marine Corps Reserve and was sent as a Staff Sergeant to Washington. DC along with his friend, the artist John Clymer, to illustrate the Marine Corps magazine, Leatherneck.
(pulpartists.com)


Back Comes the Bride
Ladies' Home Journal illustration
February 1944
From sforza-mcintosh.livejournal.com


Surrender at Appomaomattox
Triumph without Exultation
National Geographic Archives
From linesandcolors.com


Surrender at Appomaomattox
Triumph without Exultation
National Geographic Archives
From blog.encyclopediavirginia.org


Art can be a time machine, transporting us backward not only with paintings that have survived from the past, but with reconstructions of the past by contemporary artists. Tom Lovell considered himself “…a storyteller with a brush, a custodian of the past.” Best known as one of the premiere painters of the historical American West, he also created a famous series of paintings of the battles and events of the American Civil War for Life magazine, commemorating the centennial of the war’s end. He also painted other works depicting events from the Civil War, including the painting above, for National Geographic magazine. In this image, Lovell’s use of rough scumbling for textures of the walls is in marked contrast to the refined handling of the faces, which are rich with subtle colors. General Robert E. Lee, 57 (seated Confederate officer) and his military secretary are awash with light in the foreground, appearing dignified and gentlemanly as Lee signs the surrender papers, and commanding the generous space around them. Almost pushed into the corner, Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant, 42 (seated Union officer) and his Union brass form a dark mass in the background. Grant is seated a much less imposing table and seems to have a troubled expression on his face, as if worried that Lee might change his mind at any second. The other Union officers seem likewise impatient.
(Charley Parker at linesandcolors.com)
Surrender at Appomattox, certainly one of the most famous scenes of the Civil War if not of all American history. Appomattox Campaign culminated in the surrender. It’s the iconic nature of this scene—Lee and Grant somberly hunched over small tables in the McLean family parlor—that has preoccupied the American imagination. It begs for a few words of its own. And Stephen Cushman expertly provides them. Here is his description of how Grant and Lee presented themselves: “Between these two-and-a-half hours Lee, accompanied by his aide Colonel Charles Marshall and, according to Grant, “dressed in a full uniform which was entirely new, and … wearing a sword of considerable value,” met with Grant, his staff, and several Union generals, among them Sheridan, Ord, and George A. Custer, but not Meade. Years later Grant reflected that in his “rough traveling suit, the uniform of a private with the straps of a Lieutenant General” he “must have contrasted very strangely with a man so handsomely dressed, six feet high and of faultless form.” Subsequent memories and representations of this moment have confirmed Grant’s sense of the contrast, with each man’s appearance standing, respectively, for a larger social ethos, admired or denigrated, depending on a particular observer’s point of view.” That captures the moment perfectly: it was big enough for everyone.
(blog.encyclopediavirginia.org)
After the war, Lovell continued to work for slick magazines, such as McCall's, Redbook, Ladies Home Journal, and Colliers. He also painted an historical series for National Geographic Magazine. During the 1960s, Lovell was commissioned to create a series of paintings about Western oil exploration.
(pulpartists.com)


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