Saturday, February 25, 2012

A "CAMOUFLAGE ARTIST"





Bev Doolitle
From greenwichworkshop.com


The Art of Bev Doolittle encompasses the whimsical, the mystical and the spiritual, and her unique camouflage concepts. These themes are interwoven within the complete body of her work and each reveals a different aspect of the artist herself. Her style is characterized by meticulous realism, unsparing attention to detail and an extraordinary talent for drawing. Many of her works are narrative, telling a story or capturing a moment in the world of dreams or the realm of the spirit. Her storytelling captures the imagination, compelling the viewer to bring his own understanding to the work.
"Bev literally could draw as soon as she picked up a pencil," says her mother. "Even before she went to school, she had started drawing horses and people." Bev won her first award at age twelve in an art contest sponsored by the San Gabrial Historical Society and her first one-artist show was held when she was fourteen. Her high school art teacher suggested that she apply for the Saturday Scholarship at the Los Angeles Art Center College of Design; she won the scholarship and began serious art study even before graduating from high school. Later, she was accepted as a student at the Art Center. Much of Bev's subject matter is provided by the out-of-doors. "I love nature," she says, "I try to look beyond the obvious and create unique, meaningful paintings depicting our Western wilderness and it's inhabitants."
Bev Doolittle's art, especially her camouflage work, demands months of development, research of terrain and animal sketching. After developing the concept, she creates "thumbnail" sketches, up to as many as fifty, where she reworks the image until she has achieved her idea. Next, she works out all the questions of detail in a larger comprehensive pencil drawing. A color study follows, enabling her to determine the colors that add most to the composition. Finally, she decides the size for the original and begins to paint. Her technique is extremely tight and detailed and she works in a very demanding medium—transparent watercolor; it takes long weeks of intensive work to complete an original of her work. Bev says, "I start with a concept and attempt to convey it through strong design coupled with detailed realism. I want people to think when they look at my paintings." They do. Bev Doolittle's art compels our involvement. Through the magic of her vision, she vision, she forges an interaction between us and the art, rewarding our attention with the excitement of discovery.
(bnr-art.com)

Season of the Eagle LRS Art Medley
From animalpicturesarchive.com


Indian Ponies LRS Art Medley
From animalpicturesarchive.com


Two Indian Horses
From bnr-art.com


Two more Indian Horses
From greenwichworkshop.com


Bev Doolittle said, "Ever since 'Two Indian Horses' became a limited edition print in 1985, I've been hearing collectors' suggestions that I paint a sequel. Of course, my answer was 'No way! I did that painting already!' However, ten years later, I'm eating those words! Without intending to (really), I have found another fun way to tell the same story. The telling of this story differs greatly. You, the viewer, are witnessing not only what is happening in front of you, but what is taking place behind you as well. Although the format of the painting differs totally from 'Two Indian Horses,' the same two warriors are at it again - about to shorten the chain of cavalry mounts by two."

Sacred Ground
From selltheart.homestead.com


Doubled Back
From bnr-art.com


Bev Doolittle was born and grew up in California. In 1968, she graduated from the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles. She met her husband, Jay, at school, and they started married life with a painting trip to Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks-a portent of things to come. For the next five years, however, the Doolittle’s were engaged in advertising art and TV productions in Los Angeles. "It paid well, but after a while I wasn’t learning," Bev explains, "and we didn’t like living in the city. We wanted to be close to nature, and we wanted to travel." They have now accomplished both. Their frequent travels and backpacking trips have covered the western United States, Canada, Baja California, and East Africa. They now live close to nature in California. Bev Doolittle’s subject matter is provided by the out-of-doors. "I love nature," she says. "I try to look beyond the obvious and create unique, meaningful paintings depicting our Western wilderness and its inhabitants. I start with a concept and attempt to convey it through strong design coupled with detailed realism. I want people to think when they look at my paintings."
(artandnature.com)


Hide and Seek
From pixdaus.com


Hide and Seek
From bnr-art.com


"I set myself the task of hiding pinto ponies in an environment of rocks and snow," explains Doolittle. "Then I defined and refined each image to create a unique composite work where all the separate pieces come together to spell out the words 'Hide And Seek'". Each one of the twenty-four individual images is a delightful exercise in Bev Doolittle's art, blending the pony with its snowy environment brilliantly. But only when all twenty-four come together can you find the letters which are hiding among the rocks and horses.
(artifactsgallery.com)


Hide and Seek
From artandnature.com


Hide and Seek
From 3d-in-2d.com


Hide and Seek
From 3d-in-2d.com


Bev Doolittle said, ''I always saw this painting as a total design spelling out the words HIDE AND SEEK. To me, each one of the twenty-four individual paintings were just one-twenty-fourth of the total image. It wasn't until a business meeting with my publisher that I realized how much people liked the individual paintings. There were six or eight of us sitting around a conference table looking at the twenty-four finished paintings and everyone started picking their favorites. The composite image became forgotten in the discussion over the various merits of the individual paintings. It was finally decided to select the six most popular images and publish them as a portfolio of individual limited edition prints. These six prints have been reproduced the same size as the originals so that all the detail could be retained.''


Pintos
From pixdaus.com


Her camouflage art is loved by art collectors around the world. Through sheer force of talent and dedication, she has achieved a status in the art world few contemporary artists even dream of. Crowded with intricate visual detail, haunted by presences seen and unseen, her paintings captivate the viewer on many levels. She is often called a "camouflage artist" because her distinctive use of context, design and pattern help viewers discover meanings which seem hidden only until they become obvious. "I use camouflage to slow down the storytelling in a painting. But my messages about our wilderness and native peoples are never hidden. Earth is beautiful and exciting and I feel blessed that I have been allowed to explore so much of it," says this talented artist.
(artifactsgallery.com)


Beyond Negotiations
From artifactsgallery.com


There's no need for the subtlety of camouflage to enhance the storyline of this painting (above), the meaning is clear: the time for talking is over. "Beyond Negotiations is one of a few action pieces that I've created," says the artist. "I had a lot of fun with gestures, facial expressions and creating a sense of depth and dust. Containing the charging Indians within a long horizontal border was not an option. This image sums up the results of all the negotiations leading up to the present moment (whatever they may have been!) The fact that the image is bursting at the seams helps to emphasize the immediacy of the warriors' obvious negative response to the last proposal." The original artwork for Beyond Negotiations is not only Bev's first acrylic painting in over thirty years, but her largest ever. The piece began its life as a stone lithograph, but when Bev saw her sketch enlarged, she knew these warriors were destined to become a big painting.
(artifactsgallery.com)
If you want people to believe what you say, put your money where your mouth is. Or, as is the case with Bev Doolittle’s Original Fine Art Lithograph Beyond Negotiations be prepared to sacrifice revenue to protect your promise of Quality. The process through which original lithographs are created is extremely delicate in nature.
Bev spent a fairly long time working on this piece. After a while she started thinking that the image really would have made a pretty neat painting. Having committed to the idea of an Original Lithograph, she put the thoughts aside and completed her drawing. Well, one thing having led to another Bev now has that opportunity to create a painting of Beyond Negotiations and is going to do just that, create it as a painting.
(Scott Usher, Publisher and President, Greenwich Workshop)


The Arrival
From riverwindgalleryart.com


It seems that with every artist there are works that manage to make it into private collections before they are properly documented. Some of these can, in hindsight, be rather important ones. They are known to exist, but their whereabouts are a mystery. As is often the case, in time, they somehow, some way, some day reappear. Bev painted The Arrival in 1977 (above) and sold it through the Carson Gallery in Denver, Colorado, her originals distributor at that time. The work’s trail ended there. Long thought lost, the painting was rediscovered! In the thirty-year period since its rendering, Bev has produced fifty Fine Art Editions, as well as seven books and folios of collected works, all published by The Greenwich Workshop. Until now, The Arrival remained elusive. Storytelling is a hallmark of nearly all of her compositions, and The Arrival is no exception. The palette and design are instantly recognizable. Both are in service of the eponymous “Doolittle narrative” which has shaped the artist’s reputation. Storytelling through design is the hallmark of any Bev Doolittle work, and The Arrival is no exception. There is no escaping the implication of a “storm on the horizon.” Those dark clouds immediately bring to mind the Native American experience in North America. This is storytelling through design at its finest.
(riverwindgalleryart.com)



Friday, February 24, 2012

YOU'LL DIE LAUGHING





Jack Davis with Mrs. Davis
Posted By Jyrki Vainio at comicartfans.com


Jack (center) with a few ‘friends’
From meansheets.files.wordpress.com


Jack Davis' unique humorous style is instantly recognizable and has brought smiles to the faces of millions over the past five decades. Most famous for his masterful caricature work for MAD Magazine, TV Guide, Time Magazine and many others, Jack Davis will always have a sticky place in the heart of every horror fan. With his many memorable and hilarious interpretations of our favorite creepy characters he proved he was the master of mixing ghouls and giggles. Davis' wacky and witty work graced magazines, bubble gum cards, ads, record albums and posters which are now treasured collectors' items. And, according to the U. S. Congress, he was one of the artists whose delightfully gruesome work in the classic EC horror stories of the 1950's helped warp a generation with twisted tales of terror in comics like Tales from the Crypt.
(gammillustrations.bizland.com)


Williams (Shirley) and Penny Marshall (Laverne)
Front of the June 18, 1977
Issue of TV Guide
From blogs.dixcdn.com


Hunting Dog
From michaelspornanimation.com


Hunting Dog
From michaelspornanimation.com


Jack Davis (b. December 2, 1924) is like the Jerry Lewis of illustrators. What a ham! From Alfred E. Neuman’s MAD Magazine to countless TV Guide covers, his comedic, caricaturesque style has inspired and influenced (i.e., been ripped off by) legions of cartoonists. His parodies will likely be parodied forever!
(meansheets.files.wordpress.com)


Homer and Jethro Life can be miserable Album covers
From raggedclaws.com


Homer and Jethro Go West Album covers
From raggedclaws.com


During his adolescence, Jack Burton Davis' first work was published in the juvenile periodical Tip Top Comics. When he was in the Navy from 1945 to 1947, he cooperated on the Navy News, for which he created the character Boondocker. After the Second World War, he attended the University of Georgia and cooperated on the campus magazine Bullsheet. In 1951, he joined EC Comics, after having finished his continued studies at the New York's Art Students League and having assisted artists like Ed Dodd and Mike Roy on respectively 'Mark Trail' and 'The Saint'.
(lambiek.net)


Tales from the Crypt No 34
From comicartfans.com


Because Davis was quick and efficient, Feldstein and Kurtzman could always depend on him, making him the most versatile artist of the EC crew. Davis worked for all the EC horror comics, including Vault of Horror, Tales from the Crypt, Haunt of Fear, Crime SuspenStories, Shock SuspenStories, and Incredible Science-Fiction. When most of the EC titles folded in 1955 due to the Comics Code, Davis continued to work for the company's funny titles MAD and Panic.
(lambiek.net)
Jack not only illustrated for EC, but also wrote a number of stories, particularly for the war books. His tenure at EC comics lasted from 1950 to 1956, but Jack really found his stride in 1952 when they launched "MAD" comics--which later became "Mad" magazine. Jack illustrated the first story in the first issue of "MAD" (November 1952), which was a spooky old house parody called "Hoohah!" He stayed on doing "MAD" and other EC titles for years.
(crazycampsongs.com)


6 Foot Frankie
Eerie No 1
Posted By Jim Warden at comicartfans.com


During that time he also drew for other comics, including Stan Lee's pre-Marvel "Atlas" comics of the 1950s, such as "Rawhide Kid," "Tales to Astonish," "Journey into Mystery" and "Gunsmoke Western." In 1961, with the success of "MAD," Dell Comics approached Jack about doing a humor magazine, called "YAK YAK." It only lasted a few issues. Jack also illustrated for other humor magazines, including "Trump," "Humbug" and "Help!", as well as monster magazines like "Creepy" and "Eerie." Jack enjoyed doing these, especially as they offered plenty of opportunities to draw Frankenstein, his favorite character. There's no doubt that one of Jack's favorite assignments ever was when "Famous Monsters" magazine commissioned him to draw the big green guy with too-many-stitches and a couple of electrodes in his neck for a six-foot, "Giant, Life-Size Frankenstein Pin-up" poster in 1962. In 1965, Jack returned to working on "MAD"--drawing stories and covers on a regular basis. He actively continued drawing for "MAD" up until a few years ago, although his earlier work shows up regularly in current issues of MAD, through reprints and re-use.
(crazycampsongs.com)


Welcome to Texas
From raggedclaws.com


TIME Jun 18,1973
From nova100.typepad.com


One of the most popular and successful publications in the history of the medium is MAD Magazine. When Al Feldstein became editor he immediately decided he wanted to expand the focus of the magazine which had begun as a parody of primarily the comic or cartoon industry into mainstream popular culture. Movies, books and just about any other prominent subject or personality became fodder for the Madmen at MAD. Feldstein also sought after an immediately recognizable, icon or symbol for the magazine. In issue Number 30, the new and improved Alfred E. Neuman was introduced. The front cover is the classic portrait of Alfred, the back cover is by Jack Davis featuring every major personality of the time peering in. Feldstein was announcing to those that would now be the targets that Alfred and the new MAD had arrived. Hollywood, sports, politicians, entertainers and TV personalities are all depicted as only Jack Davis could do it. The center head of Alfred is not by Davis but was by Mingo. It was executed on a separate board. This part is a Color stat.
(comicartfans.com)


Water Polo - World's Toughest Sport
From goplanet.files.wordpress.com


Yak Yak Cover
From scottbrothers.wordpress.com


Yak yak Cover
From scottbrothers.wordpress.com


Yak Yak Back
From scottbrothers.wordpress.com


At the same time, Jack also did freelance work for advertising agencies—sometimes doing illustrations for ad campaigns that weren't too different from some of the ad parodies he created for MAD, such as his poster for the classic film "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad. Mad World," which Jack reprised in parody form for the 1966 Mad paperback "It's a World, World, World, World Mad." By then, Jack's work was everywhere and his distinct style was immediately recognizable to a large segment of the population, especially with the dozens of movie posters, record albums, book covers, ads, and magazines covers and illustrations he developed for leading publications such as "TV Guide," "Time," "Life," "Playboy," "Ebony," "Esquire" and countless others.
(crazycampsongs.com)


1960 Playboy Watercolor Cartoon
Posted By Rob Stolzer at comicartfans.com


This piece (above) appeared on page 113, of the November 1960 issue of Playboy. One guy in the audience says to another, "This fight's fixed!", when he sees one of the boxers getting ready to "take a dive". According to Larry, Davis drew a total of 15 cartoons for Playboy, not counting the assisting he did on "Little Annie Fanny", making his work for the magazine quite scarce. In terms of the artwork, Davis seems to have really gone the extra mile for his Playboy work, probably because it was the creme de la creme for cartoonists and illustrators. The pen work is just terrific, but even better is the richly painted watercolor work. Davis appears to have used some touches of acrylic to create both the highlights and the smokey atmosphere in the illustration. For a piece with so much brown, it certainly is wonderfully rich in person.
(comicartfans.com)
Davis was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2003. He also received the National Cartoonists Society Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996. A finalist for inclusion in the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1990, 1991 and 1992, he received the National Cartoonists Society's Advertising Award for 1980 and their Reuben Award for 2000. In June 2002, Davis had a retrospective exhibition of his work at the Society of Illustrators in New York. He was inducted into the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame in 2005.
(WIKIPEDIA)


TIME Jun 18,1973
From nova100.typepad.com


Jack Davis, the conspicuous and celebrated cartoonist with 36 Time magazine credits on his resume, hasn't had it so good lately -- both knees have been replaced, his hearing is impaired, a recent fall left him with a fractured vertebra, and the shingles, which first visited him three years ago, won't let go. "I'm a mess," he said over breakfast at the Sandcastle, "but I'm still here, and I keep busy," his cheerful bearing trumping aches and pains. What all this means is that on most days, he walks across the breezeway from his kitchen to his studio. After "knocking around" his workplace for a few minutes, he will sit down with his coffee in his Bulldog mug, look out to the Hampton River, and conjure up an idea for something or somebody. He still has a representative who brings him business, but mostly Jack creates drawings for charities and for his friends, especially those with an affinity for the Bulldogs. Drawing images for Dawg aficionados is balm for his soul. It is therapeutic for a seasoned artist who maintains overt passion for the things he likes.
(times-herald.com)


Jack Fishing
From michaelspornanimation.com


Jack at Work
From michaelspornanimation.com



Wednesday, February 15, 2012

THE CHRISTY GIRL

 


Howard Chandler Christy, April, 1900
Lafayette College Special Collections & College Archives
From academicmuseum.lafayette.edu


Christy with his wife Nancy May Palmer Christy
Peter A. Juley & Son Collection
Photograph Archives
Smithsonian American Art Museum
From sirismm.si.edu


If only one of those American girl illustrators were to be nominated as The American Artist, it would certainly be Howard Chandler Christy. His many fine art paintings include more than 140 portraits of Presidents, First Ladies, Vice Presidents, Supreme Court members, foreign dignitaries and a virtual who’s who of society and aristocracy.
(usartworks.us)


Christy Girl
From liveinternet.ru


Christy Girl
Added by Andressa Pacheco at listal.com


Christy Girl
From liveinternet.ru


Christy Girl
From liveinternet.ru


Christy Girl
From liveinternet.ru


Christy Girl
From liveinternet.ru


Christy Girl
Added by Andressa Pacheco at listal.com

Howard chandler Christy
From ecfanews.wordpress.com
Born in 1873, Howard Chandler Christy was just 22 when the first "Christy Girl" was published in the November 1895 issue of The Century magazine. Actually, he produced four images for the story, The Tragedy of the Comedy, by Chester Bailey Fernald and they depicted five women and little else. Like his contemporaries, W.T. Benda, Franklin Booth, Frank Craig, Harrison Fisher, and J.C. Leyendecker, he was a young artist in New York at a time when the magazines of the day were clamoring for images He came to the city from Ohio in 1890 when he was 16 to attend the Art Students League where he studied under William Merritt Chase. But his funds quickly ran out and he was forced by economic circumstances to return to Ohio. Two years later, he returned and studied with Chase who was promoting "plein air" as the way to paint. Chase didn't start his own school until 1896, so it's likely that these were private lessons at a preliminary version of the school. This direct-from-nature method suited Christy perfectly and his work was soon in demand. At some point, Christy attended the National Academy of Design. It may have been while he was still a student there that he received that first 1895 commission from The Century. The editors were always on the lookout for upcoming young artists and Christy was a standout student.
He provided a few illustrations to a serialized article on the Revolutionary War for Scribner's Magazine. A few months later the magazine sent him and fellow artist, F.C. Yohn to Cuba to cover the Spanish American War. The young men were likely friends as Yohn was all of 23 at the time and a fellow Art Students League graduate.
(JVJ PUBLISHING ILLUSTRATORS at bpib.com)


Chase Studio (Christy in R foreground)
Special Collections & College Archives
Lafayette College
From academicmuseum.lafayette.edu


In the process of covering the war, Christy befriended Col. Theodore Roosevelt and gained an even broader interest in patriotic subjects. By the time he returned home in 1898, he was a celebrity; his fame and reputation were truly secured with 'The Soldier's Dream', published in Scribner's, for which he portrayed a beautiful girl who became known as 'The Christy Girl.' Like 'The Gibson Girl,' she was a prototype for the ideal American woman: high bred, aristocratic and dainty though not always silken-skirted; a woman with tremendous self respect." From this point forward, Christy painted beautiful women for McClure's and other popular magazines. As for book illustrations, he also authored some such as 'The Christy Girl' and 'The American Girl', and that grew his audience exponentially. These images combined to make his notion of a beautiful girl everyone's criteria thereafter. In 1908, he returned to the riverbanks of the Muskingum River and enlarged 'The Barracks,' his childhood home, by adding a studio. In spite of being so far from the mainstream, publishers beat their way to his door. By 1910, his commission rates had reached an astounding average of $1,000 per week.
(americanillustration.org)


I Want You, 1917
Model - Mrs. Nancy Christy
From bluejacket.com


Nancy Palmer Christy
Modeling for the 1917 Navy recruitment poster
Lafayette College Special Collections & College Archives
From academicmuseum.lafayette.edu


Fly with the US Marines, 1920
National Museum of the Marine Corps
From 4gwar.files.wordpress.com


A Dream of the Future
From americanartarchives.com


Army v. Notre Dame Game 1938
From collectableivy.files.wordpress.com


Good Housekeeping
Army Navy programs
Army v. Notre Dame Game 1938 and 1939
Model - Mrs. Nancy Christy
From americanartarchives.com


Victory Liberty Loan Posters
From hapmoore.com


Gee!! I wish I were a man I'd join the Navy
Model - Mrs. Nancy Christy
From bluejacket.com


In 1915, Christy returned to New York and continued on his career path with magazine commissions. As war once again appeared imminent, Christy rallied his talents to assist in the war effort by painting posters for government war bonds, the Red Cross, Navy, Marines, and civilian volunteer efforts. His most famous poster was a young woman dressed in a Navy uniform with the caption, "If I were a man, I would join the Navy", a classic today.
(americanillustration.org)
In the 1930-31 period, he became extremely depressed as did so many others after the Great Crash of 1929. In 1934, Christy painted magnificent murals of female nudes at the Cafe des Artistes in New York, a restaurant on the ground floor of his studio building. This marked a new recognition of Christy. A new kind of commission developed for him to paint celebrities and allegorical works depicting historical events, and even posters to memorialize significant historical events. He was painting illustrations again, but of a wholly different sort.
(americanillustration.org)


Franklin Delano Roosevelt with Bill of Rights poster
Lithographic poster
Prints and Photographs Division
Library of Congress
From myloc.gov


President Franklin Roosevelt (1882–1945) tried to rouse support for an aggressive foreign policy in his January 1, 1941, Four Freedoms speech before Congress. Roosevelts four proposed universal freedoms were freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. The photograph above shows the president looking at a World War II propaganda poster by artist Howard Chandler Christy (1873–1952) that links the Bill of Rights with Roosevelts proposed freedoms.
(myloc.gov)


The Signing of the Constitution of the United States
From jackiewhiting.net


Hotel des Artistes Studio New York City
Lafayette College Special Collections & College Archives
From academicmuseum.lafayette.edu


The 1940's witnessed Christy undertaking milestone pieces such as The Signing of the Constitution (his most famous mural, which hangs in the Rotunda of the United States Capitol Building), Signing the United Nations Charter and his portrayal of Thomas Edison in Dawn of a New Light. Howard Chandler Christy died peacefully at the age of 80 in 1952, in his beloved studio apartment at the Hotel des Artistes.
(americanillustration.org)