Wednesday, April 25, 2012

THE SPIRIT OF HARLEM





James Van Der Zee
Photograph by Harry Hamburg, 1982
From en.wikipedia.org


At age 29, James Van Der Zee (June 29, 1886 - May 15, 1983) worked as a dark room technician at Gertz Department Store in Newark, New Jersey. He would substitute as a photographer when his employer was unavailable. Patrons enjoyed his creative manner of shooting subjects. This encouraged him to open his own studio, Guarantee Photography, within two years, and he was immediately successful.
(en.wikipedia.org)


GGG Studio
From flickr.com


In 1932, he outgrew his first studio and went on to open the larger GGG Studio, with his second wife as his assistant (since closed, but the building with its original sign can still be seen on the east side of Lenox Avenue between 123rd and 124th Streets in Harlem). In these studios, many visual techniques were employed using props, architectural elements and costumes in the tradition of the Victorian and Edwardian eras. So much time was taken in posing his subjects that he often only could do three sittings a day.
During the Great Depression, and as the availability of personal cameras severely lessened the need of professional photography, the gap was filled by shooting passport photographs and miscellaneous photographic jobs to make a living. After World War II, he survived via commissions and in the field of photo restoration.
(en.wikipedia.org)


Woman in a Wicker Chair
From artsandartists.org


Marriage Portrait
From tc.templejc.edu


Van Der Zee loved Harlem and admired the lives of blacks in Harlem who lived prosperous and fulfilling lives. His now iconic photographs depicted black life in Harlem. His studio soon became the place to which black celebrities of the day flocked. Among the leading celebrities who were photographed by Van Der Zee included, dancer Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, singer Hazel Scott, boxers Joe Louis and Jack Johnson, and prominent Harlem minister Adam Clayton Powell, Sr. Van Der Zee was also famous for his photographs of women, who typically shown wearing the latest fashions or as brides or as matriarchs of their families. In fact, Van Der Zee took many photographs of black families, as it was important to him to chronicle the love and continuity of the emerging middle class black family life.
(auca150art.com)


Kids at swimming pool
From exeter.edu


Raised in one of 5 black families in Lennox, Massachusetts, by parents who had been servants for retired President Ulysses S. Grant, Van Der Zee became an avid amateur photographer at age 14. In 1906 he moved to Harlem, where he taught piano and violin and co-founded an orchestra. Within a few years, Van Der Zee found that a better living could be made in photography than music (blog.clevelandart.org)


Marcus Garvey in Regalia sitting in an automobile, 1924
From digitalgallery.nypl.org


Garvey's Women's Brigade, 1924
From digitalgallery.nypl.org


Alpha Phialpha Basketball Team, 1926
From homegrownmosaic.blogspot.com


Wedding Party,1926
From auca150art.com


James Van Der Zee photographs Eubie Blake
Art gallery on Madison Avenue, NY, 1981
From allartnews.com


James Van Der Zee did not gain recognition from the art world until age 82 when, in 1969, his photographs were included in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition Harlem On My Mind. By that point, Van Der Zee had been documenting African American life for over 60 years. His lack of prior recognition was due both to his race and his choice of artistic medium.
blog.clevelandart.org)
National recognition was given to him when his collection of 75,000 photographs spanning a period of six decades of African-American life was discovered by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His photos were featured in 1969 as part of the Harlem on my Mind exhibition. From the 1970s until his death in 1983, Van Der Zee photographed the many celebrities who had come across his work and promoted him throughout the country. He was known to have brought the spirit of Harlem to life.
(en.wikipedia.org)

Monday, April 16, 2012

THE PRINCE OF EMPOWERMENT




Howard Pyle and daughter Phoebe (Johnston)
Photographer: Frances Benjamin Johnston
Source: Frances Benjamin Johnston
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division
From WIKIPEDIA


Howard Pyle (1853-1911) came to New York from Wilmington, Delaware, in 1873. He arrived at the right time and instinctively recognized the power of pictures for everyone," says Pyle's biographer, Henry Pitz. Beyond his success in magazine and book illustration Pyle had a large influence on a generation of American artists. His students included N.C. Wyeth, Violet Oakley, Harvey Dunn, Stanley Arthurs, Frank Schoonover and many others. No Pyle student ever forgot him, nor could they ever stop quoting him. What were the qualities that made him the prince of empowerment? What was his advice that might be of value to some painters today?
- Develop a sense of history.
- Seek your training close to home.
- Respect books, picture-books and reading.
- Engage in writing as a parallel skill.
- Research your interests thoroughly.
- Seek truth and correctness in settings.
- Put in time to get your drawing right.
- Sketch first to find the focal center.
- Be vigorous and stand up to work.
- Commit to the highest of possibilities.
- See the drama and theatre in your subjects.
- Depict basic emotions--grief, pride, greed, etc.
- Look for new ways to see and tell a story.
- Don't let reality destroy your imagination.
- Be an eyewitness to vivid experiences.
- Simplify compositions and waste little.
- Don't ask opinions from those you don't respect.
- Be idealistic in your life and picture making.
- Be willing to share and pass the torch.
- Be willing to mentor and teach without fee.
( Robert at painterskeys.com)
The “Golden Age of Illustration” began with Howard Pyle (considered by many to be “the father of American illustration”). He started his Brandywine School of Art and Illustration right around 1900. Pyle schooled his artists in the classical traditions of art. He taught drawing, values, edges and design as well as the necessary theories and techniques of illustration. After all, the primary objective was to train visual storytellers. And boy, could these guys tell stories with their paints! They had to cull significant passages from the literature they were given, and then translate those passages into living, visual moments for the reader. They worked under horrific deadlines, and, nonetheless, were able to craft large canvasses that were carefully designed to impart the greatest visual impact, while having to pay strict attention to the layout of the book or periodical. They frequently worked from live models and used their personal collection of artifacts that were germane to each particular rendering.
(enpleinairpro.com)

The Nation Makers
From Braian Yoder’s GoodArt gallery at goodart.org


The Nation Makers, the image and title seem to inspire everything from thoughtful consideration to reverent devotion on various blogs and web sites. It’s not as though this was the only illustration of a revolutionary war subject that Pyle ever painted: between 1877 and 1903 he produced over 85 other illustrations of revolutionary war subjects. So what is it about this painting that stimulates such interest? While Pyle illustrated many different types of stories, his personal favorite were those on the colonial past and the war for independence. One of his students quoted him as saying, “Colonial life appeals so strongly to me that to come across things that have been handed down from that time fills me with a feeling akin to homesickness . . . and my friends tell me that my pictures look as tho’ I had lived in that time.” So in some measure, a kindred feeling for that past motivated all of his images about that time. This painting is rather simple: it depicts a line of soldiers in tattered clothing and bandages marching forward through a field of grass and wild flowers. Bloodied, they do not hesitate. The picture’s action takes place just after the troop has come over the slight crest of a hill. The line of troops surges forward in an implied diagonal across the painting’s surface that runs from the lower right of the painting across to the upper left of the canvas rendering an image of forceful action. Just behind the front line of the troop, more individuals and horses fill the space and an outstretched open hand is silhouetted against the sky. The tattered and shredded stars and bars on its staff stands out, carried behind the troop’s leader directing the charge.  Pyle’s painting of individualized faces reminds us that he used his students dressed in appropriate period costumes as models for his work. Pyle’s summer school classes were held in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania near where the Battle of the Brandywine was fought on September 11, 1777, when 3,000 soldiers lost their lives.
While The Nation Makers is an image of a mass of humanity surging forward, that mass is composed of identifiable individuals, as in all wars and battles. None of these individuals turn and looking out at us the viewers, instead they are all moving forward into their future. This painting is unique. Of all the revolutionary war battle images Pyle made, this is the only one he produced without a specific story to interpret and when he did sell it as an illustration, it was not until three years after its creation and then it was published without a story. This might have been understandable if Collier’s had published it in a July 4th issue or a June 14th Flag Day issue when a patriotic focus was expected; instead it was brought out in the June 2nd issue of 1906. The delay between creation and publication was due in part to the painting being included in Pyle’s December 1903 special exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, where it was one of 110 art works shown.
( Joyce K. Schiller, Curator, Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies, Norman Rockwell Museum)


Portrait of the Writer, Oliver Wendell Holmes
From sightswithin.com


The Battle of Nashville
Governor's Reception Room
Minnesota State Capitol, Saint Paul
From stephengjertsongalleries.com


The sense of movement in Pyle's painting is achieved through the masterful integration of design and gesture. The eye is first attracted to the picturesque silhouette of flags and soldiers against the billowing smoke in the middle distance. From the right flag, the eye swoops down to the tattered flag on the left. The white head bandage then pulls the eye to the group of soldiers on the far right. Their forward movement to the left is picked up by the line of light under the mass of soldiers and thrust into the center of the fray between the broken Union line. The gestures of the soldiers on the left keep the eye from leaving the painting and lead you into the center of the action. The rhythmic repetition of lines and gestures in the soldiers rushing toward the left contrasts with the carefully placed diagonals of the muskets. These lead the eye around the corners of the canvas and back toward the main group of figures under the right flag. From here, the line of soldiers on the right again sweeps the eye around the bottom of the canvas to the breach, where it continues up the hill in an elaborate circular movement back to the center of interest.
(Stephen Gjertson at stephengjertsongalleries.com)


Howard Pyle's Book of Pirates
From gutenberg.org


CAPTAIN KEITT Book of Pirates Cover
From gutenberg.org


CAPTAIN KEITT
From gutenberg.org


Book of Pirates
Attack on a Galleon
Delaware Art Museum's collection
From Braian Yoder’s GoodArt gallery at goodart.org


Book of Pirates
Attack on a Galleon
Posted by RC at raggedclaws.com


A marooned pirate
Delaware Art Museum
From vocmaps.com


Life on board of a Company’s ship was far from pleasant. The cramped conditions of the relatively large crew (upwards of 300 men was common) in a small and confined space for a long journey made the need for clear rules and harsh sanctions obvious. The crew was informed of the behavior that was expected from them as soon as they boarded the ship. Insubordination was punished in accordance to the severity of the offence. Light offences such as cursing, inebriety, relieving oneself in inappropriate places and throwing food overboard, were resolved with fines. These often tallied to a few months’ worth of pay, and were held back from a sailor’s paycheck once he completed his contract. Slightly more severe punishments consisted of being thrown in the ship’s brig for a short amount of time or being shackled. The most inconvenient part of this type of punishment was that the perpetrator was also put on a severe ration (which was really bad when meals were already pretty scarce, as often happened). Younger crewmembers (greenhorns) could expect being whipped with a small length of rope by their older superiors when they messed up their duties. This small ‘flick of the wrist’ was not comparable to the more serious flagellation that was administered to disobedient sailors. Whips, sticks, and ropes with knots – the potential torture devices on board a ship were numerous. A sentence could easily go from light to severe just by increasing the number of hits. Another severe form of corporal punishment was branding the offender with a hot iron, though this was more commonly applied on navy ships than on those of the VOC. There was a special kind of punishment administered to someone who drew his knife on one of his fellow crewmembers. Everybody on board had a knife; it was the essential tool for almost everything they did. When frustrations between sailors peaked, it could go sour quite easily if one used their knife in the fight. Therefore there was a need to place such a heavy sanction to decrease the motivation to result to such measures. If the offender only threatened another with his knife the punishment was surmountable. He was nailed to the mast with his own knife driven through his hand. He was pinned down in this fashion until he could remove the knife himself – no one else was allowed to help.
In later centuries the punishment was somewhat less harsh; a doctor’s lancet was used to pierce the webbing between the fingers. If the sailor who pulled his knife actually wounded somebody he was not so ‘lucky’. Keelhauling was administered in such a case, and this was one of the most gruesome punishments used. An invention of the Dutch navy first recorded in the sixteenth century, keelhauling meant dropping a man into the sea, then hauling him under the keel of the ship with a rope. Barnacles on the keel would cut his skin to shreds and there was the very real possibility of drowning. Maybe not as spectacular as pinning someone to the mast with a knife, but often much more deadly, was banishment from the ship. In cases such as mutiny, the dissident was taken to land with a Hangman’s noose around his neck. He sat on the prow of a sloop with his legs already overboard. When the rowers hit bottom with their oars, the sailor was kicked hard from the prow and swam to shore. His former comrades rowed back to the ship, wishing him the best of luck. This punishment often resulted in death – either the offender starved or was killed by locals. Death sentences were carried out by simple hanging or by throwing the criminal overboard. In the case of murder, the murderer and the dead man’s body were tied together before being thrown out to sea.
(vocmaps.com)


North-Folk Legends
Published in Harper’s Journal 1903
From illustrationlife.com


The Flying Dutchman
Published in Harper’s Journal 1903
From illustrationlife.com


Travels of the soul
Published 1902 in Century Magazine
From illustrationlife.com


Travels of the soul
Published 1902 in Century Magazine
From illustrationlife.com


Howard Pyle, legend of the golden age children’s book era, painted many different subjects. He is most famous for his Pirates, but if you overlook his other work, you will not have a full appreciation for his amazing work. Above are images from his less known work, published in different story journals of his day.
(simonj at illustrationlife.com)


The Story of King Arthur and His Knights
From raggedclaws.com


The Story of King Arthur and His Knights
From raggedclaws.com


Howard Pyle’s illustrations for his 1903 book, The Story of King Arthur and His Knights, were among the finest pen-and-ink illustrations of his career, which, of course, makes them some of the finest pen-and-ink illustrations of all time.
( RC at raggedclaws.com)


When all the world seemed young
From images.fineartamerica.com


A Wolf Had Not Been Seen at Salem for Thirty Years
Illustration for "The Salem Wolf"
Harper's Monthly Magazine, December 1909
Delaware Art Museum, museum purchase, 1912-50
From rockwell-center.org


The Attack upon the Chew House
Illustration for “The Story of the Revolution”
Henry Cabot Lodge Scribner’s Magazine, June 1898
Delaware Art Museum Purchase, 1912-92
From rockwell-center.org


A celebrity in his lifetime, Pyle’s widely circulated images of pirates, knights, and historical figures were featured in publications such as Harper’s Monthly and were admired by artists and authors like Vincent Van Gogh and Mark Twain. Yet, despite his widespread popularity, Pyle’s reputation has survived only among illustration scholars and enthusiasts. Until now his work has been virtually omitted from the larger context of art history. In celebration of the centenary of Pyle’s death, the Delaware Art Museum presented "Howard Pyle: American Master Rediscovered", a major retrospective exhibition featuring 79 paintings and drawings created by Pyle between 1876 and 1910. The Museum’s Centennial Celebration begins in November 2011 with the opening of Howard Pyle: American Master Rediscovered and ends in June 2013 with the exhibition Contemporary Illustrators Honor Howard Pyle. This exhibition presents a fresh perspective on Pyle’s familiar images, exploring his interaction with the art and culture of his time and effectively repositioning him within the broader spectrum of 19th-century art.
(artknowledgenews.com)


Pyle in His Studio
From thinkinghousewife.com


Pyle’s unique approach to the art of illustration was honed through the intensive, self-directed study of the art of his time, which he experienced both in the original as well as through illustrated periodicals and books, reproductive prints, and fine art reproductions. Three key themes represented in Pyle’s work were highlighted in exhibition: Visions of the Past . Pyle’s depictions of history, including Roman gladiators and Medieval knights were presented. His views of the classical world drew inspiration from the work of the French academic artist Jean-Leon Gérôme (1824 – 1904) and his numerous depictions of the Middle Ages show how conversant Pyle was with the works of the 19th-century Pre-Raphaelites. Pyle’s pirate imagery is based on his own personal archive of costume books and historic manuscripts; however, his use of strong diagonals, flat compositional arrangements, and restrained placement of color suggests an understanding of the art world’s new-found interest in Japanese ukiyo-e prints. The contemporary art world was obsessed with Japanese art as reflected in the work of James McNeill Whistler, James Tissot, and Edgar Degas, among others. Fairytale and Fantasy focused on Pyle’s fairy tales and children’s illustrations, which show his knowledge of European illustrators, including Walter Crane (1845 – 1915) and Kate Greenaway (1846 – 1901). His depictions of the world of make-believe also reflect many of the themes and methods of European Aesthetic and Symbolist art. America – Past and Present highlights Pyle’s enthusiasm for the American Colonial Revival of the 1880s, which celebrated the history of the United States. Many of Pyle’s iconic Revolutionary War scenes seem to have been strengthened by knowledge of the work of the French Salon artist, Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier (1814 – 1891), whose military scenes of the Napoleonic Wars were immensely popular.
(Artfixdaily ArtWiretm at artfixdaily.com)


Friday, April 13, 2012

DENMARK'S MOST SKILLFUL AND BEST KNOWN PAINTER


Knud Erik Edsberg (1911 – 2003, Danish) was born to humble circumstances in Copenhagen, Denmark on August 22, 1911. His mother was a seamstress earning a meager income to support him and his sister. Despite his underprivileged upbringing, Knud found escape and solace in drawing and showed great talent early in his life. Edsberg continued painting through his adolescence and was introduced to Laurits Tuxen, a very prominent, well-respected artist known especially for his classical training and techniques, and for his royal crown-head portraits around Europe. After having his works reviewed by Tuxen, Edsberg hoped he would be accepted for future study and training with him. Although his paintings were well received, Edsberg was told, as most young artists without financial means were at that time, to go and attain a legitimate education as a painter. This education would teach aspiring artists the vast trades of the commercial painter, enabling them to earn an income to provide for themselves and future family; as living off of paintings alone could rarely support even the artist.
After years of hard, arduous work and study he finished his education and returned to Tuxen only to find his health failing and to learn that he was no longer able to take on students. Tuxen could only offer Edsberg words of advice and guidance, and a beautiful bronze sculpture. Edsberg felt that Tuxen’s passing truly ended the era of the Golden Age Danish painters he greatly admired.
(Hope Gallery at hopegallery.com)


Uma tarefa diária, 1980
A Daily Chore Mowing the Calfs

Jersey Calfs

A Tempting Carrot
All images from Hope Gallery at hopegallery.com


Becoming an artist was a long, hard, rough road for Knud Edsberg. As a young boy, he exhibited unusual ability in drawing, and his mother early recognized that he had a special talent; but being alone and very poor, she was unable even to buy him a brush and some paints. Knud attended the public schools in Copenhagen for the usual six years, then started serving a five-year apprenticeship as a house painter. The house in which he and his mother and sister lived in Copenhagen was next door to an art supply store, and Knud obtained a part-time job doing what tasks a boy of his age could perform and was paid for his services in bits of canvas, an occasional brush, and some paints. Now at last the boy could begin to make his dream of being an artist come true.
And so he started, completely on his own, with no professional guidance or help from anyone. While his friends were playing in the streets or parks, he was learning to stretch canvas and mix paints and was experimenting with methods and techniques of applying the paints to canvas, wrapping paper, cardboard, or whatever he could find when canvas was not available.
He still has, hanging on the walls of his home in Kalundborg, two tiny paintings from those early days: one, a six-inch-by-ten-inch landscape done on a cookie sheet from a pastry shop, and the other, a six-by-eight-inch painting of a fisherman done on canvas. Although his progress often seemed slow to him, he was never really discouraged, because the overwhelming desire to be a great artist that he seems to have been born with grew stronger through the years.
His mother desperately wanted to get him some help, so she took him, along with some of his paintings, to see the famous artist Tuxen. This painter was so impressed with the ability of the young man that he gave him a small statue to sell to help him in his work; however, he advised the mother to have her son finish his apprenticeship as a house painter and then to come back to see him as a student. The boy prized the statue so highly that he refused to sell it, and it was only years later when he decided to get married and desperately needed the money that he parted with it. Unfortunately, Tuxen died before Knud finished his five-year apprenticeship, so the one chance he had to get some professional help was lost.
(DOYLE L. GREEN at lds.org)




Portret Mlodej Baletnicy
Images from artchase.com


Retrato de David B. Haight
From joserosarioart.blogspot.com


When he was 22 Knud started on his first portrait. His subject was himself, and he worked on it off and on for over a year, changing this, redoing that, experimenting with new colors and methods, until he felt somewhat satisfied with the results. When he was 24, he decided that he was ready to start on another model, and his mother was pleased when he asked her to pose for him. Again it was a slow learning process, but after a number of months it was going well and he called his mother in to see the new colors he had mixed and remixed and experimented with. In her excitement over the new results he was getting, she sat on his palette, ruining his efforts of many weeks as well as her dress. He attributes the sad look on her face in the painting to this experience.
As his fame spread, people started to come to him to have their portraits painted. He has long since lost track of the number he has done, but estimates that it must be between 400 and 500. Mayors, government officials, industrial leaders, directors of banks and lodges, and presidents of clubs have all come to him for portraits.
(DOYLE L. GREEN at lds.org)


Matando a sede

Cena de fazenda

Gado descansando sob a luz da tarde

Pastando
All images from joserosarioart.blogspot.com


Edsberg spent many of his summers at a friend’s large farm in Jutland where his time spent painting and sketching ignited a great love for his country. He would employ much of his days out in the fields with his sketch books drawing animals and livestock with great attention to detail - resulting in a proficient understanding of their anatomy, postures and instinctive mannerisms. It was with these paintings that the integration of his technical understanding of, and appreciation for, both the Old Masters and Early Impressionists is evident in his palette, skill and technique. The countryside genres from his later years were mainly painted during the winters in his studio, as opposed to his favored "plein air" painting during his time on the farm.
Finally, Edsberg’s legacy left for all who knew him personally, and through his art, is a legacy of kindness, generosity and a love for all things good and beautiful. He had a great love of the Arts, science, mathematics, physics and history. However, it was his deep faith that led him to choose the path along life which he followed. As his faith stayed with him until his death, so did his love for painting. He died of age-related complications on July 15, 2003 in Holmstrup, Denmark. Edsberg looked forward to meeting his Creator, wife and daughter on the other side. Today, his paintings hang in private and public collections in Europe and the United States.
(Hope Gallery at hopegallery.com)


Thursday, April 12, 2012

VERDACCIO




Adrian Gottlieb
From ericrhoads.blogs.com


In the late 1980s, on a family trip from Burlington, VT, to New York City, young Adrian Isaac Gottlieb came face to face with his first Rembrandt. Today, at 36, he can’t quite recall which one it was among the Met’s works by that paragon among old masters, but he still feels its impact powerfully and precisely. “The sum of all its components came across as larger than life,” Gottlieb says. “It spoke to me of his ability to see beneath the surface of form and texture to the human spirit. And I felt that was the greatest type of art there was: to take something that you paint and make it so real that meeting that person or seeing that thing or going to that place would seem superfluous.” More than two and a half decades later, Gottlieb is well on his way to fulfilling that artistic goal. Though the modest, soft-spoken painter would never be so grandiose as to suggest his works rank among those of the artists he most admires, he has deliberately, meticulously set about to learn his craft as painters of centuries past learned it. The result: works likely to stop viewers in their tracks, much like the young artist himself was riveted all those years ago; paintings of present-day subjects rendered with both striking accuracy and a depth of spirit worthy of an old master.
(Norman Kolpa, SouthwestArt at southwestart.com)


Gottlieb Studio Los Angeles
Adrian Gottlieb (c) and visitors
From tamarackroadproductions.com


Born and raised in Vermont, Adrian Gottlieb’s talent and observation skills were evident from early childhood. He worked from his imagination, from life, from rented taxidermy specimens, and copied 19th century zoological drawings and portraits, building an early foundation for the pursuit of representational expression. By 15, Adrian had exhibited in the state capitol and been recognized by Vermont's Governors Madeline Kunin and Dr. Howard Dean. His painting of Abenaki Tribal Council members won second place in the Congressional Art Competition and was purchased by the University of Vermont for permanent exhibition. In 1993, Adrian was chosen a first place winner of the Young Inventors and Creators of America Award, sponsored by The Foundation for a Creative America; a Div. of the US Patents, Trademarks, and Copyright Offices. The award culminated in a ceremony and exhibition held at the Jefferson Building of the US Library of Congress in Washington, DC and a commendation from Vice President Al Gore.
(waterhousegallery.com)


The Penitent Sarah
From waterhousegallery.com


Jennifer
From waterhousegallery.com


The poet
From southwestart.com


Adrian Gottlieb began Atelier study during his undergraduate years at Carnegie Mellon University College of Fine Art and Rochester Institute of Technology, School of Art & Design. Inspired by realist imagery from an early age, Gottlieb became increasingly aware of the dearth of training in hands-on methods and techniques. He enhanced his university studies by attending Charles H. Cecil Studios Summer Intensive programs for three summer terms. Under the tutelage of Charles Cecil, Gottlieb was first exposed to the near lost drawing and painting techniques developed from the Renaissance through the Boston School.
Following the 1998 Summer Intensive, Gottlieb returned to the US to pursue independent study in gross anatomy and anatomical drawing (RIT and Rochester University Medical School). He earned his BFA (with honors) later in 1998 and immediately enrolled in the Intensive Drawing Program offered by the Florence Academy of Art in Italy. He was later invited to remain at the FAA. He completed the Painting and Drawing program in 2001. After serving as an instructor from 2000 to March 2002, Gottlieb left the academy to focus on advanced techniques and a personal style and vision.
During 2002, he was chosen first place winner of the Art Renewal Center (ARC) annual international scholarship competition and was awarded "honorarium" which made possible his one-on-one study of advanced composition with expatriate classical realist painter Maureen Hyde during 2002/2003. Adrian returned to the US during the summer, 2003 and was invited to help develop a classical realist curriculum to be offered at the Los Angeles Academy of Figurative Art in California.
(artvt.com)
Adrian Gottlieb’s works have been exhibited at the Panorama Museum in Germany, the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia and the Pasadena Museum of California Art, California. His paintings are in private and public collections throughout the United States, in Europe and Scandinavia including the renowned Wilton House collection in Wiltshire near Salisbury, England. Painting directly from life, Gottlieb assiduously avoids the use of photographic reference material or optical aids.
(waterhousegallery.com)
The followings are the Four Stages of Verdaccio taught by Adrian Gottlieb (All images from underpaintings.blogspot.com and articles from artistnetwork.com):


Imprimatur

1. “After I do a drawing and color study, I draw in paint, working on top of a warm imprimatura (first layer, the underpainting) that is closest to burnt umber in color and actually rather dark in value. I try for the color/value of the imprimatura to be the approximate color/value of the shadows of my main subject. When the imprimatura is fully dried, I draw in a similar color.”

Piambura

2. “In this step I build up the piambura, or white base, thinly so that the finished painting will have a luminous and translucent effect. It’s important that I create a good value relationship and blueprint of the form right from the beginning.”

Verdaccio technique

3. “The Verdaccio technique, which uses a verdaccio layer is particularly advantageous for a bright figure against a relatively dark background. I fully model the forms, using temperature variations (cool and warm) between blue-greens and reds. I keep the painting too light (in value) so when I glaze the piece, the tone will fall back down.”

Portrait of Gregg

4. “You can see the results of the primary and secondary glazes, executed in thin layers, using lakes of color that are similar in degree of transparency and tint. I then apply straight color to work out the exact color notes and establish the relationship between figure and ground in Portrait of Gregg.” -Adrian Gottlieb.


The four stages of Verdaccio Technique
Under painting technique in preparation for final glazing
From gottliebstudios.com


“To quote Ingres, drawing is truly "three and a half quarters of painting." Whether one plans to create a drawing or a completed painting, the principles are much the same. One looks to capture form, the rhythms of the contour, anatomy, gesture, and value. When the planned result is a painting, the only additions are color and the texture lent by brush strokes."
"Creating a realist painting is fairly simple to describe. Conversely, creating a good realist painting is difficult to accomplish. Bearing in mind the requirements of the above-mentioned drawing concepts, the idea is to bring about a fully unified piece in color. More so than in drawing, the basis of a successful painting lies in the creation of illusion: the illusion of volume, the illusion of distance and space, the illusion of light, and even the illusion of color itself. Throughout the process, I strive to define and attain the precise color/values of the background, the shadow shapes, the darkest darks, the lightest lights (I try to add color even for the brightest highlight) the basic lights, and the transition tones. Ultimately, all of these will serve as a blueprint for the painting. I dedicate as much time as is necessary to ensure I meet these criteria."
"At the end of each painting session, I soften most of the edges. This makes it easier for me to work back into the painting at the beginning of the next session. Many of the colors will have dried and the oils will have settled to the bottom of the layer, leaving the top layer of pigment unsaturated. The result is a matte effect; the layer is so dull that the proper color/values cannot be judged. These absorbed areas must be oiled out or retouched. While some painters prefer using walnut oil or Damar retouch varnish, my technique is to apply copal retouch varnish in order to re-saturate the colors. Medium can accomplish this just as well when I intend to work back over a passage."
"One of the goals of the naturalist painter is to accomplish the most information using a minimal number of brush strokes. This is much easier said than done. It is simpler to apply more brush strokes than necessary; however, in doing so the painting will inevitably develop a tortured appearance. This goal forces the artist to constantly refine brush stroke technique. My current palette for flesh consists of lead white, lead tin yellow, yellow ochre, vermilion, transparent red oxide, pyrol ruby red, cobalt blue, transparent sepia, olive green and ivory black. I mix all colors on the palette before application. Mixing color directly on the canvas can produce a muddy color and texture. It can technically also result in more vibrant colors, but I find that mixing the colors on the palette first produces consistently cleaner colors. When mixing any color, I limit the number of source colors to four or less. Any additional source colors can negatively affect the purity of the final color. Ideally, one uses only as many colors as one absolutely needs. It is essential that my finished pieces appear to glow. If the painting does not appear to emit its own source of light, I find the piece to have a dissatisfying and dead feel.” – Adrian Gottlieb.
(adriangottlieb.com)


Piambura of Heather
From underpaintings.blogspot.com


Detail of the Photographer
Portrait of Jim French
From gottliebstudios.com


Viewing Gottlieb's paintings in person, one is immediately struck by the painterly quality of his work. While he has expanded his themes to include varied subject matter, Gottlieb’s passion remains centered on figurative compositions. It is in this genre that Gottlieb excels, infusing the two-dimensional surface with a luminous and quality that conveys the illusion of life-force. His works can be found in both private and public collections throughout the United States and Europe. He has exhibited at the Panorama Museum in Germany, and the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art in Atlanta and the Pasena Museum of Fine Art, in addition to galleries across the United States and exhibitions in Italy and is regularly invited to participate in the California Art Club's Annual Gold Medal Juried Exhibition. Adrian Gottlieb is currently represented by S.R. Brennen Galleries in Palm Desert, California, Scottsdale, Arizona and Sante Fe, and Galerie Michael in Beverly Hills, CA. He is invited annually to particiupate in the "Great American Figurative Artists" exhibition presented by the Waterhouse Gallery in Santa Barbara, CA.
(adriangottlieb.com)