Monday, August 19, 2013

TERENCE TENISON CUNEO




Out of the Night
From masterart.com


Cuneo was born in London, the son of Cyrus Cincinato Cuneo and Nell Marion Tenison, artists who met while studying with Whistler in Paris. Cyrus Cuneo's elder brother Rinaldo Cuneo was also an acclaimed painter in San Francisco, as was his youngest brother Egisto Cuneo. Terence Cuneo studied at Sutton Valence School, Chelsea Polytechnic and the Slade School of Art, before working as an illustrator for magazines, books and periodicals.
In 1936 he started working in oils, continuing with his illustration work. During World War II he served as a sapper but also worked for the War Artists Advisory Committee, providing illustrations of aircraft factories and wartime events. He served and became good friends with fellow artist Cyril Parfitt.
(Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Big Boy on Sherman Hill
From masterart.com


The Union Pacific Big Boy, the largest successful engine ever created, was not only a technological achievement and trophy piece, rather a necessity for the Union Pacific Railroad. Built for one purpose and one purpose alone: to pull large tonnage over the 1.55% continuous grade up Sherman Hill, based in the Wasatch mountain region, just east of Ogden Utah. Before Big Boy, a helper service was required. This is where a smaller engine is coupled to a mainline freight to ‘help’ it over the hill. The engine would then return to the bottom of the hill and await the next through train. Not only was this a slow process, but rather expensive. A new engine was needed, one that could pull a train up the hill unassisted.
The UP Class 4000 (4-8-8-4) articulated Big Boy was the answer. The American Locomotive Company (Alco) Locomotive Works was commissioned to build the engine. Starting in 1941, twenty engines were built: 4000 to 4019, then again in 1944 five more were delivered - 4020 to 4024.
At 6.00pm on 5th September 1941, the first Big Boy, 4000, strode through the east end of the UP’s Omaha yard. After testing and trials the 4000 was immediately put into active service. Mainly used during the peak season from July through November, the 4000s were used to take the massively heavy ‘red balls’ over the Hill. The ‘red balls’ are also known as PFEs, or Pacific Fruit Express Reefers, basically produce trains. Due to the heavy nature of these cars when fully loaded, prior to Big Boy, it wasn’t unusual to see 2, 3 or even 4 engines struggling up Sherman Hill. Now, just one Big Boy and one engine crew was needed, saving the Union Pacific a lot of money. Big Boy served as king of the hill for twenty-one years, travelling an astonishing one million miles each (4016 had the lowest mileage at 1,016,124 and 4006 the highest at 1,064,625). They accumulated more service than most, fighting their way relentlessly up the grades every day. They reigned supreme over Sherman Hill until the summer of 1957. Normally, it was not uncommon to see anywhere from three to six Big Boys travelling from Cheyenne to Laramie every day, all pulling separate trains.
(macconnal-mason.com)


Forgan's Trench, Pontruet

'Golden Arrow'

Tyre Production

'Flying Cheltenham'
Images from bbc.co.uk


After the war, Cuneo was commissioned to produce a series of works illustrating railways, bridges and locomotives. A significant point in his career was his appointment as official artist for the Coronation of Elizabeth II, which brought his name before the public worldwide. He received more commissions from industry, which included depicting manufacturing, mineral extraction and road building, including the M1. He was most famous for his passion for engineering subjects, particularly locomotives and the railway as a whole. But in fact Cuneo painted over a wide range, from big game in Africa to landscapes. Further success was achieved in his regimental commissions, battle scenes and incidents as well as portraits.
(Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
In 1934, Cuneo married Catherine Monro and from 1940 they lived in Ember Lane, East Molesey. He had two daughters, Carole and Linda, and three grandchildren, Andrew, Melanie, and Cindy. He was a well-known figure in the neighbourhood, contributing to its cultural life and bringing many famous figures to the area, including Prince Philip. He was President of the Molesey Arts Society, and the Thames Valley Art Society.
(elmbridgemuseum.org.uk)


Invasion scene

Production of tanks
Images from wikimedia.org


Many of his works include a small mouse (sometimes lifelike, sometimes cartoon-like), his trademark after 1956. They can be difficult to detect, and many people enjoy scouring his paintings to find one. Even some of his portraits of the famous contain a mouse. Cuneo was awarded the OBE and was a CVO. A 1.5 times life size bronze memorial statue of Cuneo, by Philip Jackson, stands in the main concourse at Waterloo Station in London. It was commissioned by the Terence Cuneo Memorial Trust (established March 2002) to create a permanent memorial to the artist, together with an annual prize at the Slade School of Art, given by the Trust. In tribute to Cuneo's trademark, the statue includes a hidden mouse peering from under a book by the artist's feet, and another carved into the statue's plinth near the ground.
(Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
His work has been used in a variety of ways, from book jackets and model railway catalogues to posters and jigsaws and even Royal Mail postage stamps. His work can also be found in many museums and galleries, including the Guildhall Art Gallery, Lloyds of London, the National Railway Museum, the Royal Institution and many Officers' Messes around the country. Terence Cuneo was granted Freedom of the City of London in 1993. Sadly Terence died in London on 3 January 1996. However, his paintings live on in so many places around the globe, a permanent reminder of such a wonderfully talented man.
(cuneosociety.org)
Terence Cuneo was always searching for new subjects away from the studio. He first made his mark as a racing artist in the 1920s, with his "Pitwork" series depicting Le Mans and other racing circuits. This was the training ground for future subject matter - the excitement of speed, busyness and movement which would come into his later works of equestrian subjects. His technique and skill developed when he became a war artist in the Second World War - another field for him to conquer - and later with his many travels to such places as Ethiopia and the Far East.
An exhibition of his work soon after the war demonstrated his inquisitive eye. The many military works that came out of the war and later are to be seen in the various messes around Britain: the Royal Artillery and the Rifle Brigade among others. There is always a place for an artist who observes, records and illustrates. The camera can lie, so can an artist to himself, but never to his public. Terence Cuneo was a public man; it shows in his work, the time he gave to many committees and in his universal friendship.
(Part of Obituary for Terence Cuneo, Tim Coates, The Independent, 8 January 1996)

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